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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1998

Peng S. Chan and David Peel

This study offers a framework for understanding the causes and impact of reengineering. The framework views the causes and impact from two aspects, namely, external and…

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2842

Abstract

This study offers a framework for understanding the causes and impact of reengineering. The framework views the causes and impact from two aspects, namely, external and internal dimensions. Using case research, it was found that both external and internal factors were important in driving reengineering as well as in explaining the results brought about by reengineering.

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Business Process Management Journal, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-7154

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1997

Edmond H. Weiss

It cannot be known for sure, but it appears that the sentence uttered most often by advocates for the reengineering construct is: ‘Reengineering is not downsizing!’ This…

Abstract

It cannot be known for sure, but it appears that the sentence uttered most often by advocates for the reengineering construct is: ‘Reengineering is not downsizing!’ This disputed association of terms usually draws a defensive complaint or disclaimer from reengineering enthusiasts and from any corporate communicator who must win either public or employee support for the programme. But this paper argues that this recurring disclaimer is naive and self‐serving. That is, enthusiasts for reengineering tend to mislead us and themselves in three ways. They—fail to examine the suspect organisational metaphor on which the reengineering construct is based;—equivocate about the meaning of the essential term ‘work’; and confound the goals of reengineering with its inevitable consequences.

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Journal of Communication Management, vol. 2 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-254X

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 2000

Mohsen Attaran

Process redesign is not always successful and is almost always accompanied by pain or at least unpleasant side effects. Many companies have undertaken reengineering

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2906

Abstract

Process redesign is not always successful and is almost always accompanied by pain or at least unpleasant side effects. Many companies have undertaken reengineering efforts only to abandon them with little or no positive results. As important as it is to understand how to reengineer, it is crucial to understand how to avoid the traps. A disciplined, step‐by‐step approach to implementing process redesign is critical to the effort. This article offers a framework for the successful design and construction of the reengineering solution.

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Journal of Management Development, vol. 19 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1994

John Farrell

The only true gauge of successful reengineering is whether the reengineered process delivered results that increased the competitive advantage of the organization…

Abstract

The only true gauge of successful reengineering is whether the reengineered process delivered results that increased the competitive advantage of the organization. Therefore, success lies not only in executing a well‐defined methodology, or in developing leading‐edge technology or a set of human‐resource enablers, but in effectively implementing the changes.

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Planning Review, vol. 22 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0094-064X

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2004

Ronald J. Burke

This study examined employee reactions to a process reengineering initiative in a large financial services organization. Data were obtained from 2,514 employees, using…

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2604

Abstract

This study examined employee reactions to a process reengineering initiative in a large financial services organization. Data were obtained from 2,514 employees, using questionnaires completed anonymously. Employees having longer company tenure, those at higher levels, and men held more favorable attitudes toward the reengineering initiative. Employees indicating greater understanding of the reengineering effort had more favorable attitudes toward it. Employees holding more favorable attitudes toward the process reengineering initiative also reported more positive work experiences and outcomes and described the organization in more favorable ways. Implications for managing large‐scale change efforts are proposed.

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The TQM Magazine, vol. 16 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-478X

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1999

Mohsen Attaran and Glenn G. Wood

Business process reengineering is the hottest trend in management. Done well, it delivers extraordinary gains in speed, productivity, and profitability. But process…

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3987

Abstract

Business process reengineering is the hottest trend in management. Done well, it delivers extraordinary gains in speed, productivity, and profitability. But process redesign is not always successful and almost always accompanied by pain or at least unpleasant side effects. Many companies have undertaken reengineering efforts only to abandon them with little or no positive results. How can you increase the odds for success? Here are a few lessons from the front.

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Management Decision, vol. 37 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Article
Publication date: 4 April 2020

M.F.F. Fasna and Sachie Gunatilake

Currently, most of the organisations that undertake business process reengineering (BPR) projects with the intention of enhancing their business performance are…

Abstract

Purpose

Currently, most of the organisations that undertake business process reengineering (BPR) projects with the intention of enhancing their business performance are encountering several issues throughout their endeavours. As these BPR implementation issues are perceived as one of the key contributory factors leading to BPR project failures, it is crucial to adopt timely strategies to overcome these issues. Hence, this study is focused on identifying the strategies to be adopted to overcome BPR implementation issues.

Design/methodology/approach

Four case studies were conducted in organisations that have successfully implemented BPR projects within last five years. In total, 14 semi-structured interviews were conducted among the different stakeholders who got involved in the selected BPR projects for identifying the issues faced and the strategies that they have adopted during their project implementation.

Findings

Study derived twenty-seven issues faced by the Sri Lankan organisations during different phases of BPR projects, and forty-five unique strategies to deal with these derived BPR implementation issues.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the field by exploring the issues in implementing BPR projects that should be given enough consideration to ensure the success of BPR projects in the Sri Lankan context along with the strategies to overcome the issues encountered throughout them. It is expected that the findings of this study would be useful in ensuring the success of future BPR projects.

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Business Process Management Journal, vol. 26 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-7154

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1993

Jill Vitiello

If reengineering's such a cure‐all, why does it fail more often than not? The answer, say its adherents, lies in how seriously you take its mandate.

Abstract

If reengineering's such a cure‐all, why does it fail more often than not? The answer, say its adherents, lies in how seriously you take its mandate.

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Journal of Business Strategy, vol. 14 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0275-6668

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Article
Publication date: 9 February 2010

Linda L. Zhang, Roger J. Jiao and Qinhai Ma

The purpose of this paper is to provide a methodology to industry and academia on how to reengineer the order fulfillment process (OFP) by capitalizing on integration and…

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1798

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide a methodology to industry and academia on how to reengineer the order fulfillment process (OFP) by capitalizing on integration and coordination across the entire supply chain to sustain supply chain management.

Design/methodology/approach

A case study at a semiconductor equipment manufacturer in Singapore is undertaken.

Findings

This paper confirms that the traditional OFPs present companies a challenge to satisfy the demanding customer requirements while achieving performance optimization of each supply chain partner; and it is imperative to reengineer the OFPs to stay competitive. To successfully reengineer OFPs, the efforts should be systematically organized to, for example, exploit potential processes as many as possible, determine an optimal process based on mathematically sound grounds.

Research limitations/implications

The use of a single case study may limit the generalizability of the findings.

Practical implications

A methodology incorporating accountability‐centered approach and simulation is developed for companies to reengineer OFPs while considering the entire supply chain.

Originality/value

The literature does not provide solutions for reengineering OFPs regardless of the fact that OFP reengineering is an emerging area of interest. This paper presents a valuable contribution to this topic by introducing a methodology and by applying the methodology to a semiconductor equipment manufacturer in Singapore.

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Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, vol. 21 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-038X

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1999

Valter Moreno

This work employs a phenomenological approach to investigate how people experience the radical transformation of their work lives caused by reengineering (BPR) processes…

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1487

Abstract

This work employs a phenomenological approach to investigate how people experience the radical transformation of their work lives caused by reengineering (BPR) processes. The common essences of the experiences of three co‐researchers are synthesized into a composite textural‐structural description of the reengineering phenomenon. The analysis of the rich, multidimensional information offered by participants reveals that reengineering projects elicit complex experiences involving a multitude of horizons. In particular, the analysis suggests that, by taking the discourse of efficiency to extremes, reeengineering ends up by unveiling the conflicts inherent in the arrangements that generally characterize workplace. This proposition goes beyond the traditional belief that the basic reason for resistance in BPR projects is the fear of layoffs or the modification of power arrangements. Indeed, such factors seem to be part of the problem. It is also necessary to understand the important role of the crisis that reeengineering may generate in individuals’ ongoing process of sense making.

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Information Technology & People, vol. 12 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

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