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Book part
Publication date: 13 July 2016

Reef Youngreen and Jay Byron

This research identifies the conditions under which minority views are likely to be influential in problem-solving groups.

Abstract

Purpose

This research identifies the conditions under which minority views are likely to be influential in problem-solving groups.

Methodology/approach

Predictions that status processes moderate the effect of being exposed to minority views on idea generation are tested with data collected from a controlled laboratory experiment.

Findings

Results indicate some support for the hypotheses that groups exposed to minority views generate more novel ideas, as do groups in which minority views are espoused by higher-status confederates.

Research limitations/implications

Future research is required to establish the parameters that reduce flawed decision making based on convergence around the majority view.

Social implications

Groups may realize their problem-solving potential through the consideration of more information and an examination of alternative views to the majority view by exposure to minority views, particularly those presented by higher-status people.

Originality/value

By integrating status characteristics theory and minority influence theory, we explain how the greater attention granted to higher-status people and their ideas results in the generation of more unique ideas by other members in a group. The integrated theory explains how status processes affect the consideration of ideas, the examination of alternatives to the majority view, and the generation of new ideas among group members.

Details

Advances in Group Processes
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-041-1

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 20 October 2020

Reef Youngreen and Joseph Silcox

Purpose – In this chapter, we outline early sociological thinking on time rooted in various philosophies of time and review the relatively current research in the area of…

Abstract

Purpose – In this chapter, we outline early sociological thinking on time rooted in various philosophies of time and review the relatively current research in the area of temporal perspective. Next, we define the scope of the social psychology of time and illustrate how and why social psychology has failed to properly and effectively include time as a central component of study. Finally, we link current thinking about time to group processes research, most directly to identity and social identity processes (though not exclusively), making clear the ways current and future approaches could benefit from including temporal perspectives.

Methodology – We review relevant research engaged with concepts related to time in psychology, sociology, and social psychology. On the foundation of our review and the identification of gaps in the literature, we provide insights and recommendations regarding how temporal perspectives may be adopted by existing knowledge bases in sociological social psychology.

Findings – As a conceptual chapter, this work presents no empirical findings. A review of the literature reveals a scarcity of research effectively embedding temporal perspectives in major areas of social psychological research.

Practical Implications – The recommendations we make for connecting temporal perspectives to existing research areas provide a practical foundation from which to develop new ideas.

Social Implications – This work contributes to the social psychology of time by detailing how time is an important, yet mostly overlooked, component to our understandings of many social psychological processes. In the effort to extend identity and social identity theory in specific, we add to the general knowledge of the self and self-processes via the incorporation of temporal perspectives.

Originality – This work is the first to explore how temporal perspectives in sociological social psychology are employed, but mostly, how they are underutilized. We make recommendations for how novel theoretical predictions may emerge by including perspectives about time in existing research programs.

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Book part
Publication date: 6 July 2005

Michael J. Lovaglia, Reef Youngreen and Dawn T. Robinson

A theory of self and the identities it comprises may explain differences in academic and other cognitive performance because successful performances are associated with…

Abstract

A theory of self and the identities it comprises may explain differences in academic and other cognitive performance because successful performances are associated with strong internal motivation. Identity control theory and affect control theory assume that individuals act to confirm identities, even when those actions have negative consequences. Cognitive performance, then, could be impaired if high performance is inconsistent with a salient identity. A developing theory explaining the relationship between identity maintenance and cognitive performance assumes that the effects of identity maintenance combine with other motivations to achieve. Anticipation of a performance relevant to an identity is assumed to put pressure on the identity, motivating performances consistent with it. Under some conditions identities may change to reflect different performance standards.

Details

Social Identification in Groups
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-223-8

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Book part
Publication date: 26 June 2007

Jeffrey W. Lucas, Heather Ridolfo, Reef Youngreen, Christabel L. Rogalin, Shane D. Soboroff, Layana Navarre-Jackson and Michael J. Lovaglia

Two studies investigate gender and status effects on self-handicapping: selecting actions that can impair future performances, perhaps to protect self-image. Gender…

Abstract

Two studies investigate gender and status effects on self-handicapping: selecting actions that can impair future performances, perhaps to protect self-image. Gender socialization and status processes suggest two potential explanations for the consistent finding that men self-handicap more than women. If status differences contribute to the tendency to self-handicap, then holding gender constant, those with high status on other characteristics would self-handicap more than those with low status. In Study 1, men assigned to high-status positions selected less study time (and thus self-handicapped more) than did men assigned to low-status positions. Women assigned high status, however, self-handicapped no more than did women assigned low status. Because study time as a measure of self-handicapping may be confounded with confidence or motivation, a second study assigned status and measured self-handicapping by the selection of performance-enhancing or -detracting music. Study 2 also found that high status increased self-handicapping among men but not among women. Both gender socialization and status processes may play roles in self-handicapping.

Details

Social Psychology of Gender
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-7623-1430-0

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Book part
Publication date: 23 September 2013

Christabel L. Rogalin

This chapter seeks to theoretically answer the question: under which circumstances do groups succeed under female leadership? Further, is it possible to conceptualize the…

Abstract

Purpose

This chapter seeks to theoretically answer the question: under which circumstances do groups succeed under female leadership? Further, is it possible to conceptualize the engineering of groups such that group success under female leadership is a likely outcome?

Design/methodology/approach

In this chapter, I draw on identity control theory (Burke & Stets, 2009; Stets & Burke, 2005) and role congruity theory (Eagly, 2003) to discuss the implications for female leaders of the discrepancy between the female gender identity and the leader identity. Next, I draw upon status characteristics theory (Berger et al., 1972) to further illustrate the negative consequences of being a female leader. Then, drawing on group processes research, I make the explicit link between the negative expectations for female leaders on group performance through the endorsement of group members. Finally, I utilize innovative research using institutionalization of female leadership to propose a possible solution for improving group performance.

Research implications

I present nine testable hypotheses ready for empirical test.

Social implications

I propose that training materials underscoring the skills that females have as leaders can subvert the development of conflictual expectations facing female leaders, thus removing the deleterious effects on group performance. That is, if group members receive training that emphasizes the competencies and skills women bring to the group’s task and to the leadership role, then group performance will not be threatened.

Details

Advances in Group Processes
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-976-8

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 20 October 2020

Abstract

Details

Advances in Group Processes
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80043-232-1

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Book part
Publication date: 6 July 2005

Abstract

Details

Social Identification in Groups
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-223-8

Click here to view access options
Book part
Publication date: 26 June 2007

Abstract

Details

Social Psychology of Gender
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-7623-1430-0

Click here to view access options
Book part
Publication date: 6 July 2005

Abstract

Details

Social Identification in Groups
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-223-8

Click here to view access options
Book part
Publication date: 13 July 2016

Abstract

Details

Advances in Group Processes
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-041-1

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