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Book part
Publication date: 31 August 2016

Timothy B. Folta, Constance E. Helfat and Samina Karim

This paper introduces the volume on Resource Redeployment and Corporate Strategy, which is devoted to exploring a relatively new justification for how multi-business firms…

Abstract

This paper introduces the volume on Resource Redeployment and Corporate Strategy, which is devoted to exploring a relatively new justification for how multi-business firms create value – having flexibility to internally redistribute non-financial resources across their businesses. We clarify how a theory around resource flexibility differs from other theories of how multi-business firms create value. We then synthesize the collection of papers in this volume and describe how they contribute to this line of inquiry. Finally, we offer our own views on opportunities for elaboration of this theory.

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Book part
Publication date: 31 August 2016

Douglas P. Hannah, Robert P. Bremner and Kathleen M. Eisenhardt

This paper addresses resource redeployment in ecosystems. Prior research examines the value of resource redeployment across product markets in multi-business firms. In…

Abstract

This paper addresses resource redeployment in ecosystems. Prior research examines the value of resource redeployment across product markets in multi-business firms. In contrast, resource redeployment across ecosystems is an important corporate strategy employed by both single- and multi-business ecosystem firms that has received little attention. To address this gap, we present a case study of resource redeployment by an entrepreneurial firm in the US residential solar industry. We propose that the value creation mechanisms (i.e., improving capabilities, bottleneck relief) are fundamentally different when resources are redeployed in ecosystems. We identify “consumption-side” interdependence of components and “production-side” resource relatedness as playing critical roles in both types of value creation and propose conditions under which resource redeployment is most valuable. Overall, we contribute insights into the literatures on resource redeployment and strategy in business ecosystems.

Details

Resource Redeployment and Corporate Strategy
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-508-9

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Book part
Publication date: 31 August 2016

Jaideep Anand, Hyunseob Kim and Shaohua Lu

Firms pursue a number of redeployment strategies in order to achieve growth and create value for their stakeholders. While the majority of previous research focuses on how…

Abstract

Firms pursue a number of redeployment strategies in order to achieve growth and create value for their stakeholders. While the majority of previous research focuses on how firms create synergic value by sharing resources across multiple business units, we lack a systematic analysis of the determinants of different redeployment strategies. In this paper, we develop a theoretical framework that allows us to systematically investigate how intrinsic resource characteristics affect resource redeployment strategies. Our framework identifies four critical characteristics of resources, that is, fungibility, scale-free nature, decomposability, and tradability. We develop a number of predictions that provide guidance for researchers to identify the optimal resource redeployment strategy appropriate for resources with a certain set of characteristics.

Details

Resource Redeployment and Corporate Strategy
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-508-9

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Article
Publication date: 13 September 2011

Hsiang‐Ming Lee and Ching‐Chi Lee

This study aims to examine the country‐of‐origin's impact on consumer purchase behavior post‐acquisition, especially when the acquirer‐dominant business is afflicted by a…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine the country‐of‐origin's impact on consumer purchase behavior post‐acquisition, especially when the acquirer‐dominant business is afflicted by a low country‐of‐origin image and the acquired business enjoys a high country‐of‐origin image. This study also aims to examine brand redeployment strategy impacts on consumer purchase intentions.

Design/methodology/approach

Data are collected from an online questionnaire in Taiwan. A total of 325 usable questionnaires are returned. Data analysis is conducted using regress analysis and ANOVA.

Findings

These results indicate that general country attributes and general product attributes have a positive effect on purchase intentions. In addition, general product attributes play a mediating role between general country attributes and purchase intentions. These results further show that target‐dominant redeployment strategy is the most powerful to purchase intentions. A company which wants to use M&A to increase market share must seriously consider general country attributes, general product attributes and brand redeployment strategy because these three constructs affect purchase intentions, and consequently maintain consumer loyalty and attract new customers.

Originality/value

There were seldom studies which investigated country‐of‐image effect and M&A from marketing perspective. The major contributions of the study were investigating consumers' perception of the effects on country‐of‐origin image and the redeployment strategy on an acquired brand.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 28 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

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Book part
Publication date: 31 August 2016

Joel Blit, Christopher C. Liu and Will Mitchell

Strategy research has long understood that reconfiguration of the scope of the activities a firm engages in over time is critical to its long-run success, while…

Abstract

Strategy research has long understood that reconfiguration of the scope of the activities a firm engages in over time is critical to its long-run success, while under-emphasizing differences in redeployment strategy that underlie apparently similar scope and changes in scope. In this paper, we build on the idea that a firm’s number of activities (scope) and change in activities (turnover) arise from two fundamental rates of redeployment: the rate at which activities are added and the rate at which activities are subtracted. In net, the turnover rate reflects how actively a firm reconfigures its resource base by redeploying resources via addition and subtraction of activities. We develop a model that links addition and subtraction with the composition of a firm’s activities and then provide an empirical illustration using data from the U.S. Patents and Trademarks Office. As an example of one extension, the model can be generalized to incorporate elements of absorptive capacity. The analysis contributes to our understanding of how firms reconfigure their activities and provide managers with a clearer understanding of tools that guide redeployment of existing resources.

Details

Resource Redeployment and Corporate Strategy
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-508-9

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Article
Publication date: 16 March 2021

Cher-Min Fong and Hsing-Hua Stella Chang

This research examines consumer assessments of brand value derived from the redeployment of brand-related assets following a crossborder acquisition (CBA). The current…

Abstract

Purpose

This research examines consumer assessments of brand value derived from the redeployment of brand-related assets following a crossborder acquisition (CBA). The current study synthesizes research on international marketing standardization/adaptation to the context of crossborder horizontal acquisitions as the market entry strategy to investigate consumer evaluations of the postacquisition choice of brand name and brand positioning.

Design/methodology/approach

A pretest and two studies were conducted in Taiwan to empirically examine effects from the theory-driven model of product legitimacy (PL) on an entity's postacquisition brand value, as well as any moderating effects of consumer localism.

Findings

Postacquisition brands were evaluated more positively when positioned in a manner that was in accordance with perceived PL. Consumer localism as another contingency factor reflected consumers' favorable attitude toward marketing adaptation following CBAs.

Originality/value

This article is a pioneering work to draw on the consumer perspective to investigate asset redeployments between the acquirer and target following a crossborder horizontal acquisition. Specifically, this research introduces PL as a contingency factor to examine consumers' evaluation of brand value, which is derived from the redeployment of brand name and brand positioning in the context of a developed-country firm's acquisition of an advanced emerging-market firm for entry into the market.

Details

International Journal of Emerging Markets, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-8809

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Book part
Publication date: 1 January 2004

Jaideep Anand

Firms in mature or declining industries are faced with the challenge of redeploying their excess resources to new applications, and M&A strategies can be an important…

Abstract

Firms in mature or declining industries are faced with the challenge of redeploying their excess resources to new applications, and M&A strategies can be an important component of this effort. I consider two ways in which excess resources are applied to more attractive business opportunities through M&A, and I analyze these strategies through the lenses of industrial organization economics, resource-based view, evolutionary perspective and agency theory. In the redeployment strategy, firms seek attractive opportunities in related industries, using acquisitions to fill any resource deficiencies. In the consolidation strategy, firms combine with their competitors within the same industry. The resulting larger pool of resources provides greater opportunities for disposing off their under-utilized resources through the market, while enhancing their profitability. Either way, excess resources can find new applications, within the firm in the former strategy and through the market in the latter. I also discuss some implications for future research and practice.

Details

Advances in Mergers and Acquisitions
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-172-9

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1992

Hedley Malloch

The aim of the paper is to demonstrate and explain the importance of redeployment as a HRM policy. The literature and empirical work on labour flexibility identifies three…

Abstract

The aim of the paper is to demonstrate and explain the importance of redeployment as a HRM policy. The literature and empirical work on labour flexibility identifies three types of labour flexibility. The principal writers associated with this approach claim that the numerical/functional/financial distinction is one which explains virtually all the important dimensions of innovation in manpower management in Britain in recent years. (Atkinson 1985(b), p. 26). This paper will suggest that there is a fourth type of labour flexibility, that is redeployment which is defined as spatial or geographical flexibility or flexibility of place. Redeployment is ignored in the HRM and labour flexibility literature, but the empirical results reported in this paper suggest that it is both widespread and seen by many managers as an essential link between their HRM policies and their competitive strategies.

Details

Management Research News, vol. 15 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0140-9174

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Book part
Publication date: 31 August 2016

Gary Dushnitsky and Thomas Klueter

An important precondition for resource redeployment is that firms are aware of the commercial applications for which their resources can be used. We take an inventing-firm…

Abstract

An important precondition for resource redeployment is that firms are aware of the commercial applications for which their resources can be used. We take an inventing-firm perspective and ask: how many new commercial applications will a firm associate with an existing technological invention? We note that both technological and organizational characteristics determine the number of distinct applications firms consider feasible for a given technological invention. In particular, we suggest that inherently fungible technologies, that is, technologies that have a broad impact on other technological fields (highly general technologies), will be associated with a larger set of commercial applications. We also suggest that linking applications to an inherently general technology can be challenging when the technology is already embedded in organizational (commercial) routines. Proprietary data from an online marketplace allow us to investigate the applications firms consider feasible for their technological inventions. In line with extant work, a firm assigns a greater number of applications to more general technologies. As expected, however, this relationship is shaped by how the technology is embedded within the organization. Our results have implications for redeployment as firms may face challenges in the initial step of redeployment when fungible resources need to be linked to emerging market opportunities.

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Book part
Publication date: 31 August 2016

Josep M. Argilés-Bosch, Josep Garcia-Blandon and Mónica Martinez-Blasco

This paper undertakes an empirical analysis of the impact of absorbed and unabsorbed slack, employing three different measures for each slack type, on firm profitability…

Abstract

This paper undertakes an empirical analysis of the impact of absorbed and unabsorbed slack, employing three different measures for each slack type, on firm profitability. We find that unabsorbed slack has a more favorable influence on future firm profitability than absorbed slack. While all the absorbed slack indicators have a significant negative influence on future profitability, the three unabsorbed slack indicators present positive, negative, and non-significant influences, respectively. The fewer constraints of unabsorbed slack on the redeployment to exploit new opportunities point to its comparative advantage over absorbed slack. We find evidence for the differential impact of absorbed versus unabsorbed slack on profitability in firms with lower levels of slack, which suggests firms prefer to withdraw resources from current business and redeploy them to develop new and more favorable business opportunities.

Details

Resource Redeployment and Corporate Strategy
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-508-9

Keywords

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