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Article
Publication date: 24 August 2021

Bente Flygansvær, Asta Gjetø Samuelsen and Rebecka Våge Støyle

Research shows a recycling behavior gap where end consumers are positive towards recycling but do not act in accordance with their intentions. Such a gap creates…

Abstract

Purpose

Research shows a recycling behavior gap where end consumers are positive towards recycling but do not act in accordance with their intentions. Such a gap creates challenges for reverse logistics systems. The purpose of this paper is to investigate how adaptations in reverse logistics systems towards end consumers-turned-suppliers can improve recycling behavior.

Design/methodology/approach

A framework with three propositions is developed and evaluated empirically using a two-group dependent post-test quasi-experimental design. The empirical setting is recycling of household waste. Three interventions are evaluated as: (1) the social norms nudge, (2) the distance nudge and (3) the availability nudge.

Findings

The results show that nudging improved recycling action behavior for the experimental group. Control group behavior remained constant.

Research limitations/implications

This paper suggests that the end-consumer’s role as suppliers needs to be included more actively into reverse logistics systems for products to enter the preferred loops of recycling in the circular economy.

Originality/value

A new field of climate psychology is used to explain challenges in reverse logistics systems and nudging is demonstrated as a tool with which to deal with them. The study also shows how quasi-experiments can be applied in logistics research.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 51 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

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Article
Publication date: 20 May 2021

Narjes Haj-Salem and MohD Ahmad Al-Hawari

The purpose of this study is to develop a model that integrates self-conscious emotions (i.e. anticipated guilt and anticipated pride) alongside the theory of planned…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to develop a model that integrates self-conscious emotions (i.e. anticipated guilt and anticipated pride) alongside the theory of planned behavior’s key explanatory factors to challenge the idea that recycling behavior is driven mainly by cognitive factors. The model is empirically validated in the United Arab Emirates (UAE), a region where research are lacking despite generating one of the highest per capita solid waste and holding one of the lowest recycling rates.

Design/methodology/approach

The data was collected from the general public in the UAE using a two-wave survey (n = 287). The first wave of data collection measured the constructs except for the actual recycling behavior. The second wave assessed the respondent’s self-reported recycling behavior for the previous fortnight.

Findings

Anticipated guilt, subjective norms, perceived effort and recycling knowledge are the main drivers of the intention to recycle. The latter impacts the actual recycling behavior positively. Attitude toward recycling and anticipated pride failed to predict the intention to recycle. Awareness of consequences triggers only anticipated pride, while the degree of concern is a significant predictor of both anticipated pride and guilt.

Practical implications

One key implication of this research is that governments in the Middle East have not only to focus on cognitive factors but also emotions to promote recycling behavior.

Originality/value

This study adds to the pro-environmental literature by showing that the decision to recycle is not only based on cognitive factors but also anticipated guilt. It is also one of the first that explore recycling behavior in the UAE.

Details

Journal of Social Marketing, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-6763

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Article
Publication date: 3 October 2019

Moonhee Cho

Proposing an integrated model based on multiple theoretical approaches, such as the theory of planned behavior, the model of goal-directed behavior and self-determination…

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1557

Abstract

Purpose

Proposing an integrated model based on multiple theoretical approaches, such as the theory of planned behavior, the model of goal-directed behavior and self-determination theory, the purpose of this paper is to examine factors influencing college students’ campus recycling intention and actual recycling behavior.

Design/methodology/approach

An online survey method was used to test the proposed model with college students. A total of 434 students participated in the survey.

Findings

This study found that self-determined motivation, attitude toward recycling, perceived behavioral control and negative anticipated emotion had direct effects on campus recycling intention, while recycling intention and self-determined motivation influenced students’ actual campus recycling behavior.

Research limitations/implications

The findings of the study may not be generalizable to the broader population. Respondents’ self-reported assessment of their recycling behaviors may also be a drawback of the study. However, the study provides statistical evidence testing the proposed model of campus recycling.

Practical implications

The study’s findings provide communication planners for university recycling and sustainability departments with communication and message strategies to enhance college students’ recycling behavior.

Originality/value

The study proposes a more comprehensive, tailored model that integrates other compelling theoretical models, to address college students’ sustainability engagement on campus.

Details

International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, vol. 20 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-6370

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Article
Publication date: 8 April 2019

Diego Costa Pinto, Márcia Maurer Herter, Patrícia Rossi, Walter Meucci Nique and Adilson Borges

This study aims to reconcile previous research that has provided mixed results regarding motivation for sustainable behaviors: pure altruism (cooperation) or competitive…

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1030

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to reconcile previous research that has provided mixed results regarding motivation for sustainable behaviors: pure altruism (cooperation) or competitive altruism (status). Drawing on evolutionary altruism and identity-based motivation, the authors propose that a match between pure (competitive) altruism and individualistic (collectivistic) identity goals enhance consumers’ motivations to engage in recycling (green buying).

Design/methodology/approach

Three experimental studies show how pure and competitive altruism are associated with specific sustainable consumption (Study 1) and how altruism types should be matched with identity goals to motivate sustainable consumption (Studies 2 and 3).

Findings

Study 1 shows that pure altruism is associated with recycling but not with green buying. Studies 2 and 3 show that pure (competitive) altruism and individualistic (collectivistic) goals lead to higher recycling (green buying) intentions.

Research limitations/implications

The present research extends previous findings by showing that pure and competitive are indeed associated with specific sustainable behaviors. The authors suggest that the interaction between motives and identity goals can lead to a greater impact on recycling and green buying intentions.

Practical implications

Public policymakers and companies will benefit by better understanding how specific combinations of altruism types and identity goals can foster recycling or green buying intentions.

Originality/value

This research is the first to show how matches between pure and competitive altruism types and individualistic and collectivistic identity goals affect consumers’ motivations to engage in recycling and green buying.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 53 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Article
Publication date: 13 February 2019

Abdullah Al Mamun, Roselina Ahmad Saufi, Muhammad Mohiuddin and Syed Ali Fazal

As recycling is associated with various environmental benefits, it is important that it is encouraged in Malaysia. Taking the disappointingly low recycling rate in…

Abstract

Purpose

As recycling is associated with various environmental benefits, it is important that it is encouraged in Malaysia. Taking the disappointingly low recycling rate in Malaysia as its backdrop, the purpose of this paper is to examine recycling intentions and behaviors among micro-entrepreneurs in Kelantan, Malaysia, drawing on the theory of planned behavior.

Design/methodology/approach

The study adopted a cross-sectional design and stratified random sampling method to select 200 informal micro-entrepreneurs from Kota Bharu, Kelantan; then, quantitative data were collected through structured interviews. For data analysis, this study adopted variance-based structural equation modeling, i.e. PLS–SEM.

Findings

The findings indicated that environmental awareness had a significant positive effect on micro-entrepreneurs’ attitudes toward the environment. They also confirmed a positive and significant effect of attitude and perceived behavioral control on intention toward recycling and the effect of intention toward recycling on recycling behavior among the study sample.

Practical implications

Policies and programs focused on environmental awareness could nurture a positive attitude toward the environment, which, together with the capacities and resources available, could significantly influence the adoption of recycling behavior among informal entrepreneurs.

Originality/value

It is recommended that both public and private environmental protection and socio-economic development organizations combine their efforts to formulate and enforce policies and programs to promote recycling behavior among Malaysian entrepreneurs, which could spread the recycling spirit among all Malaysians.

Details

World Journal of Entrepreneurship, Management and Sustainable Development, vol. 15 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-5961

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Article
Publication date: 20 September 2013

T. Ramayah and Elham Rahbar

This research was carried out to assess the recycling behaviour of university students, as they are the future consumers of the country.

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3908

Abstract

Purpose

This research was carried out to assess the recycling behaviour of university students, as they are the future consumers of the country.

Design/methodology/approach

A model based on the Theory of Reasoned Action was developed and tested using the variance‐based structural equation modelling technique of Partial Least Square (PLS).

Findings

The findings indicate that the attitude towards recycling is significantly influenced by perceived value, awareness and actual gains perceived by the consumers. Recycling behaviour was significantly influenced by resistance to change and attitude towards recycling.

Originality/value

The paper enables the policy makers target these variables in their future action plans in order to enhance recycling behaviour.

Details

Management of Environmental Quality: An International Journal, vol. 24 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7835

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2021

Cheng-Min Chao, Tai-Kuei Yu and Tai-Yi Yu

The purpose of this study is to develop and empirically test a model that can predict factors affecting student recycling behavior. The theoretical model was based on…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to develop and empirically test a model that can predict factors affecting student recycling behavior. The theoretical model was based on motivation, place attachment, environmental concern and interpersonal altruism.

Design/methodology/approach

A cross-sectional study was conducted with college students in Taiwan using self-report questionnaires. Of the 800 distributed questionnaires, 523 were completed (response rate of 65.4%) and were analyzed using structural equation modeling. Partial least squares (PLS) were used to test the models and hypotheses.

Findings

The results showed that environmental concern, motivation, interpersonal altruism and place attachment have significant positive effects on recycling behavior and motivation and place attachment have significant positive effects on interpersonal altruism. This research contributes to the existing literature by discriminating between two sorts of motivation: intrinsic and extrinsic. Based on these findings, suggestions for future research and practical implications are presented.

Originality/value

Few studies have linked motivation, interpersonal altruism, environmental concern and place attachment to recycling behavior. Therefore, this study aimed to explore these relationships, specifically as they affect college students’ behavior. This paper anticipates that increased knowledge about recycling behavior could be used to support the wider adoption of recycling practices.

Details

International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-6370

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Article
Publication date: 14 June 2011

Frank H. Bezzina and Stephen Dimech

The purpose of this paper is to explore different factors of recycling behaviour with evidence from Malta in order to determine which of these factors emerge as…

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3625

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore different factors of recycling behaviour with evidence from Malta in order to determine which of these factors emerge as significant predictors of the recycling participation of Maltese residents.

Design/methodology/approach

For this study, the recycling behaviour of 400 Maltese residents selected at random from the e‐Electoral Register for general elections and local councils was investigated. A behavioural framework was adopted and the questionnaire used incorporates elements from the Theory of Planned Behaviour (TPB), the Model of Altruistic Behaviour (MAB) as well as other determinants of recycling behaviour (e.g. inconveniences and demographic variables). The participants had the option of answering the questionnaire by telephone or via an online survey which was e‐mailed directly to the participants.

Findings

The study shows that nine factors – “personal recycling attitudes, norms and skills”, “satisfaction with service provided”, “inconveniences”, “awareness of consequences”, “knowledge of issues”, “social recycling attitudes and norms”, “motivating factors”, “intentions to act” and “scheme preference” – account for 68.5 per cent of the variability in the recycling behaviour of Maltese residents. Additionally, the first three factors highlighted above emerged as significant predictors of recycling participation and together accounted for 48.5 per cent of the variability in recycling participation. In the light of the findings, the issue of adopting a corporate communications programme emerges as a possible strategy aimed at putting mandatory EU recycling targets for Malta back on track.

Originality/value

This study provides empirical evidence from Malta that the incorporation of elements from the Theory of Planned Behaviour, the Model of Altruistic Behaviour as well as other additional variables (e.g. situational factors and demographic factors) makes a significant contribution to the understanding of the recycling behaviour and the recycling participation of Maltese residents.

Details

Management of Environmental Quality: An International Journal, vol. 22 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7835

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Article
Publication date: 12 October 2012

Calvin Wan, Ronnie Cheung and Geoffrey Qiping Shen

This study investigates the recycling attitudes and behaviour of university students and staff members, and suggests ways to improve environmental policies and recycling

Downloads
7183

Abstract

Purpose

This study investigates the recycling attitudes and behaviour of university students and staff members, and suggests ways to improve environmental policies and recycling facilities in a university campus.

Design/methodology/approach

This study applies the theory of planned behaviour, through which it develops an instrument to measure the determinants of recycling behaviour among the people in a university campus. A survey was designed and administered at a public university in Hong Kong; 205 valid responses from 179 students and 26 staff members were collected. A partial least squares approach was used to validate the proposed model. This model accounted for the 42.1 per cent and 50.3 per cent variance (R2) in behavioural intention and behaviour, respectively, vis‐à‐vis recycling activities.

Findings

The survey results suggested that behavioural intention with regard to recycling is influenced by attitude, the subjective norms, perceived behavioural control, awareness of consequences, the moral norms, and convenience. Educational and promotional programmes highlighting the benefits and importance of recycling activities and convenience of the recycling facilities can be adopted as the key strategies to encourage recycling on campus.

Research limitations/implications

The unique culture in relation to recycling in the specific campus environment and the nature of the sample might limit the generalisability of the results to other areas and contexts. The self‐report‐based measures adopted in this study might lead to a social desirability bias in the results provided by the respondents.

Originality/value

The findings provide insightful information for universities and the wider community to shape a more user‐friendly and convenient recycling scheme. This can fulfil the actors' social responsibility.

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Article
Publication date: 27 July 2012

Leila Elgaaied

So far, few studies dealing with the determinants of pro‐environmental behavior have examined the impact of emotional variables. This research aims to extend previous work…

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3415

Abstract

Purpose

So far, few studies dealing with the determinants of pro‐environmental behavior have examined the impact of emotional variables. This research aims to extend previous work on the role of affective motivations underlying ecological behavior by exploring the influence of anticipated guilt on recycling.

Design/methodology/approach

A cluster analysis was conducted among 276 French interviewees based on their current recycling behavior, anticipated guilt, environmental concern, awareness of negative consequences and beliefs about facilitating conditions in their community of residence. In order to confirm assumptions related to the suggested typology, further quantitative tests were performed.

Findings

Three profiles were identified. Results suggest that environmental concern and awareness of the negative consequences associated with the increase of waste volume are not sufficient conditions to stimulate diligent recycling efforts. Anticipated guilt appears to influence behavior more directly and totally mediates the relationship between environmental concern and intention to recycle.

Research limitations/implications

Implications of this research exclude countries where recycling is mandatory or represents a strongly internalized social norm.

Practical implications

This study holds important implications in terms of public authorities' intervention. The emergence of anticipated guilt as a key determinant of intention to recycle suggests that guilt appeals could be a relevant communication strategy in order to promote recycling.

Originality/value

This research provides new insights to understand the role of anticipated guilt on ecological behavior using a typology. A predictive model of intention to recycle was also proposed.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 29 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

Keywords

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