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Article
Publication date: 1 November 2008

Nageen Mustafa

Specifically, organisations in both the private and public care sectors will be examined. Incidents reported by the media surrounding the failures in recruitment

Abstract

Specifically, organisations in both the private and public care sectors will be examined. Incidents reported by the media surrounding the failures in recruitment procedures will be discussed. An evaluation of recruitment decision‐making will be carried out and details of the present study, which considers how recruitment decisions are being made at present by organisations in the National Health Service (NHS), social care (SC), higher education (HE), further education (FE) and care home (CH) sectors, will be reported. The first wave of data collection consisted of informal interviews carried out with a series of recruitment decision‐makers from these organisations. Results showed that a variation in recruitment decision‐making between organisations exists, and so the protection of vulnerable persons may be being put at risk.

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The Journal of Adult Protection, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1466-8203

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1998

Noreen Heraty and Michael Morley

Reviews contemporary thinking on recruitment and selection in organisations. Draws upon data from a 1992 and a 1995 survey to explore the nature of current recruitment and…

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20460

Abstract

Reviews contemporary thinking on recruitment and selection in organisations. Draws upon data from a 1992 and a 1995 survey to explore the nature of current recruitment and selection practices in Ireland with particular reference to managerial jobs. Policy decisions on recruitment are examined, recruitment methods are reviewed, and the influence of ownership, size, unionisation and sector on the methods chosen is presented. Selection techniques employed are identified and the situations in which they are most likely to be utilised are highlighted.

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Journal of Management Development, vol. 17 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2004

Christopher O.L.H. Porter, Donald E. Cordon and Alison E. Barber

One aspect of attracting new employees that has historically been ignored by recruitment researchers is salary negotiations. In this study, we used a hypothetical scenario…

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1362

Abstract

One aspect of attracting new employees that has historically been ignored by recruitment researchers is salary negotiations. In this study, we used a hypothetical scenario design to depict salary negotiation experiences in which we varied the levels of salary offer, the behavior of a company and its representative, and the deadlines for receiving a signing bonus. MBA students served as study participants who read the scenarios and responded to questions about perceived organizational attractiveness and job acceptance decisions—two important recruitment outcomes. As hypothesized, our results indicated that salaries, a company's responsiveness to candidate questions, and a company representative's expression of derogatory comments all impact recruitment outcomes. However, exploding signing bonuses had no significant effects, calling into question the negative connotation practitioners have of exploding compensation schemes. Our justice framework revealed that many of the effects that we found for our manipulations on participants' judgments regarding our recruitment outcomes were mediated by perceptions of organizational justice. Finally, we found some evidence of the frustration effect, as procedures that were considered fair worsened rather than mitigated the negative effects of unfair outcomes on job acceptance decisions.

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International Journal of Conflict Management, vol. 15 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1044-4068

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2016

Sim Siew-Chen and Gowrie Vinayan

The purpose of this paper is to provide insights into the conduct of recruitment process outsourcing (RPO), based on a real-life case study of one company in Malaysia. The…

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4383

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide insights into the conduct of recruitment process outsourcing (RPO), based on a real-life case study of one company in Malaysia. The paper analyses the company’s process of recruitment outsourcing from beginning to end, in three sections: RPO decision, RPO implementation and RPO outcome.

Design/methodology/approach

The case study was carried out through semi-structured interviews with relevant respondents, including the country HR manager, the HR staff and operation managers in the organisation, plus with the RPO provider.

Findings

The key findings, from a theoretical and academic viewpoint, are that RPO decisions and implementation cannot be fully or properly explained by one theory, but are better explained by integrating transaction cost economics, the resource-based view and the Agency Theory. The study also highlights the importance of involving end users in the RPO process.

Research limitations/implications

While this single case study gives a clear, in-depth insight into the issues in this particular instance, future research extending to a wider range of organisations would serve to expand the findings and provide more generalisable results.

Practical implications

Practitioners and service providers should be able to draw valuable lessons from the experience of Tech-solution, particularly from the different perceptions and levels of satisfaction about the service provider’s performance between internal HR and the internal end users (operation managers).

Originality/value

This paper provides a specific and detailed analysis of RPO implementation in practice. It also addresses the call for more RPO outsourcing-specific research in the extant literature.

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Article
Publication date: 18 September 2009

Emma Parry and Hugh Wilson

The internet is initially hailed as the future of recruitment and is expected to replace other media as the preferred recruitment method, but the adoption of online…

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29268

Abstract

Purpose

The internet is initially hailed as the future of recruitment and is expected to replace other media as the preferred recruitment method, but the adoption of online recruitment has not been as comprehensively predicted. In addition, empirical research regarding online recruitment from an organisational perspective is sparse. This paper aims to examine the reasons behind an organisation's decision to use online recruitment, and reports on the development of a model of the factors affecting the adoption of this recruitment method.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper uses in‐depth interviews and a survey of human resource (HR) managers with recruitment responsibility. The factors that affect the adoption of online recruitment are explored, and related to Rogers's diffusion of innovation theory (DIT) and Ajzen's theory of planned behaviour (TPB).

Findings

Factors related to the adoption of corporate web sites and commercial jobs boards are found to be different, with positive beliefs/relative advantage, subjective norms and negative beliefs emerging in the case of corporate web sites and positive beliefs/relative advantage and compatibility for jobs boards. These results provide some fit with both Ajzen's and Rogers' factors.

Originality/value

This paper addresses an important area that is under‐researched academically and provides a basis for further research into how organisations may adopt online recruitment successfully.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 38 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

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Article
Publication date: 29 April 2021

Vasanthi Suresh and Lata Dyaram

Despite several concerted efforts and directives, Indian organizations have a long road to travel with respect to the inclusion of persons with disabilities in the…

Abstract

Purpose

Despite several concerted efforts and directives, Indian organizations have a long road to travel with respect to the inclusion of persons with disabilities in the workforce. Disability taking different forms often impacts organizational decisions on employment and inclusion of persons with disabilities. Acknowledging the role of employers in improving their employment prospects, the purpose of this paper is to examine key factors that direct the decisions regarding targeted recruitment of persons with various types of disabilities.

Design/methodology/approach

The exploratory study is based on thematic analysis of senior executives' accounts to examine the factors that direct their decisions pertaining to employment of persons with varied types of disabilities.

Findings

Findings highlight organizational determinants that enable/disable employment of persons with varied types of disabilities. The organizational determinants reported are: knowledge about type of disability; work characteristics; accommodations based on type of disability; accessibility of physical infrastructure and external pressures; whereas, persons with orthopedic, vision, hearing and intellectual disabilities are represented in the employee base.

Research limitations/implications

The present study contributes to employer perspectives on workplace disability inclusion toward understanding the nuances of organizational dynamics and human perceptions. Future studies could explore perspectives of other key stakeholders and the conditions under which organizational determinants are perceived as enabling or disabling.

Originality/value

The present study highlights how disability type influences leaders' views on recruitment of persons with disabilities, in an under-researched study context of Indian organizations.

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Equality, Diversity and Inclusion: An International Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-7149

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1986

R.J. Sutherland

The total neglect of human assets as opposed to physical assets is one of the anomalies of financial accounting. Perhaps nowhere is this anomaly greater than in the…

Abstract

The total neglect of human assets as opposed to physical assets is one of the anomalies of financial accounting. Perhaps nowhere is this anomaly greater than in the instance of the professional football club, because here the net worth of the human resources, principally the playing staff, helps determine playing success and perhaps ultimately financial success. Moreover, such is the nature of the employment contract in professional football, these human resources may be transferred between clubs, and the corresponding financial transaction is manifest in what might be termed autonomous and induced effects in the financial accounts of the buying and selling club respectively.

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Managerial Finance, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4358

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Book part
Publication date: 16 December 2009

Rebecca L. Schiff

This chapter focuses on the development of concordance theory with respect to India's civil–military relations and Pakistan's early yet significant state of discordance…

Abstract

This chapter focuses on the development of concordance theory with respect to India's civil–military relations and Pakistan's early yet significant state of discordance, which led to subsequent domestic military interventions. On a regional level, discordance is far more prevalent, and India operates in a South Asian environment where domestic military interventions are not uncommon – Pakistan, Bangladesh, and Sri Lanka being clear examples.

Moreover, the influence of China in the region cannot be overlooked, since India's defense policy is often a reaction to the role of China and the presence of conventional and nuclear forces. The proliferation of nuclear weapons, in particular, threatens a delicate balance in a highly volatile region where China exerts enormous influence on neighboring states including Pakistan. An argument can be made that India's domestic concordance between the military, the political elites, and the citizenry contributes to the preservation of regional stability, because India has chosen to maintain its regional strength vis-à-vis China and Pakistan, while continuing to search for a peaceful solution to the nuclear issue with allies such as the United States. India's most recent and ongoing nuclear deal with the United States originally struck in 2005 is an example of the delicate synergies taking place to offset potential threats from China, Pakistan, and Iran, while maintaining domestic military and technological strength.

Although India's successful domestic course encourages partnerships among international political and corporate allies, Pakistan's continuous domestic discordance has resulted in recent difficult relations with the United States, India, and Afghanistan. Pakistan's inability to quell al-Quaeda extremism has contributed to a lack of domestic confidence in General Musharraf's political agenda. Musharraf has continued the discordant political and social relationship begun by his predecessor Ayub Khan. As a result of Khan's initial and dramatic alienation of the East Bengali community, Pakistan's military and political elites have never recovered the domestic credibility needed to partner with other political groups and the citizenry – a credibility so vital to domestic concordance and international foreign policy.I do not want my house to be walled in on all sides and my windows to be stuffed. I want the cultures of all the lands to be blown about my house as freely as possible. But I refuse to be blown off my feet by any.– Mahatma Gandhi

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Advances in Military Sociology: Essays in Honor of Charles C. Moskos
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84855-893-9

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 1995

Suresh S. Prabhu

Hospital information systems have evolved from data processingsystems for patient billing and payroll to decision‐support systemswhich support decision making at the…

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2177

Abstract

Hospital information systems have evolved from data processing systems for patient billing and payroll to decision‐support systems which support decision making at the middle and upper management levels. With the advancements in the areas of database management, expert systems and networks, important hospital functions such as physician recruitment and referral which historically were performed using traditional procedures, are now performed using these computer‐based technologies. Develops a generalizable framework for information systems for physician recruitment and referral using technologies of database management, expert systems and networks. This GIS‐PRR system may be used by hospitals and other health‐care providers to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of the physician recruitment/ referral process.

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Journal of Management in Medicine, vol. 9 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-9235

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 1997

Gerald Vinten, David A. Lane and Nicky Hayes

There can be no doubt that the small and medium sized enterprise (SME) plays a pivotal role in most if not all economies, and that social policy makers have an interest in…

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1345

Abstract

There can be no doubt that the small and medium sized enterprise (SME) plays a pivotal role in most if not all economies, and that social policy makers have an interest in ensuring the viability of this sector of the economy, which plays a crucial role in the contract culture of national and international competitiveness. Quite apart from the essential symbiosis between the large multinationals and public limited companies and this sector, the sustainability of unemployment benefit payouts would be jeopardised should the sector experience a significant downturn. There are already worldwide concerns about the ability to continue to finance state pensions at anything like the present scale, and any loss of viability of the SME sector will simply exacerbate this situation. There are also useful reciprocations to be achieved by comparisons across sectors, including in significant areas such as internal control (Vinten, Lane, Hayes, 1996). The recent flurry of activity has included initiatives of the Institute of Chartered Accountants of England and Wales 1996) and the information needs of owners (Institute of Chartered Accountants of England and Wales 1996a), an Auditing Practices Board (1996) Practice Note, and a Department of Trade and Industry Consultation Document (DTI 1996).

Details

Management Research News, vol. 20 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0140-9174

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