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Article
Publication date: 7 June 2013

Melissa A. Hubbard and Amber T. Loos

The purpose of this study is to determine the extent to which academic libraries participate in and assess initiatives to increase or maintain student enrollment levels at…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to determine the extent to which academic libraries participate in and assess initiatives to increase or maintain student enrollment levels at colleges and universities in the US.

Design/methodology/approach

An online survey of academic library directors in the US was conducted. The 31 question survey was distributed via email to 321 librarians in the sample population. The survey response rate was 42.7 percent. Quantitative data were analyzed using SPSS 19.0 and qualitative data were coded according to recruitment or retention strategy.

Findings

Regardless of institution type or size, libraries in the sample population were just as likely to participate in recruitment and retention initiatives. However, some libraries stood out as particularly active in recruitment and retention initiatives. Indicators of active library participation were identified.

Research limitations/implications

The response rate for the survey did not generate a statistically significant sample size, given the population. However, the data generated here contribute significantly to the relatively scant literature on academic library participation in retention and recruitment activities. The findings also suggest the need for the profession to focus on creating assessment tools to measure library impact on recruitment and retention.

Originality/value

No other studies have surveyed the academic library field to document the extent to which they participate in and assess recruitment and retention initiatives.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 41 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Article
Publication date: 29 July 2019

Meera Shanker

The purpose of this paper is to find out the effect of recruitment practices on the retention of commercial pilots by the airlines in India. Often it is found that trained…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to find out the effect of recruitment practices on the retention of commercial pilots by the airlines in India. Often it is found that trained pilots pilfered by other airlines within/outside of India and Indian aviation industry have to rely on expatriate pilots to fly the aircrafts. Newly appointed pilots are required to be trained due to the lack of experience, which is a huge investment by the airlines. Therefore, the recruitment and retention of the commercial pilots create challenges for aviation industry in India.

Design/methodology/approach

Research design of the present study was exploratory and descriptive to evaluate the effect of recruitment practices on the retention of commercial pilots by airlines in India. All together, 225 commercial pilots from different Indian airlines participated in the present study. Instruments were designed to understand the practices related to recruitment, selection and retention strategies of commercial pilots used by these airlines, and how pilots perceive about recruitment practices and its relevance for retention strategies in the organization. Data were analyzed using factor analysis, Pearson’s correlation and regression analysis

Findings

Results of data analysis have revealed five factors of retention and selection measures, which were encouraging and employee-friendly recruitment policy, impact of external factors, organizational internal factors, employment brand and organizational growth and self-advancement opportunities. Similarly, retention strategies measures had four factors, namely, positive work culture, opportunities for individual growth, development, and salary benefit package, and opportunity for self-achievement. Pearson product moment correlation coefficient result revealed significantly positive relationship between various dimensions of recruitment and selection to retention strategies. Further regression analysis revealed the effect of those recruitment policies on retention was positive.

Research limitations/implications

Findings of this study could be potential bias and prejudice of the people involved and responded. As information was collected only form Indian commercial pilots, the findings might have changed if study was to be applied to a different country or economy. Random sampling error could not be ruled out. Preferred, accepted and perceived recruitment strategies and retention polices of Indian aviation sectors might be different as compare to other countries aviation sectors policies. Influence of cultural, organizational internal and external factors result might be different as compared to result of present study.

Practical implications

This is an important study, which will help the aviation sector to design recruitment policies and retention strategies to retain pilots to deal with a high level of attrition. Furthermore, present study will help the aviation sector in designing their policies and strategies, which forces pilots to remain with particular air carrier for longer time. It will give the same direction to other organizations, in general.

Social implications

The concept of recruitment and retention is applicable to each and every service sector. There could be different parameters for the same. Social implication of the present study is the same as it is for the aviation sectors. It is implied that service sectors must have appropriate recruitment policies, i.e. encouraging and employee friendly recruitment policy, conscious and continuous evaluation organizations’ external as well as internal factor, efforts shall be made to create employment branding, always focus on growth and advancement opportunities for the employees and organization. Positive work culture, opportunities for individual growth and development, salary benefit package and opportunity for self-achievement will help employees to remain with the organization for longer time.

Originality/value

This is an original research in the area of understanding recruitment policies and retention practices of commercial pilots in Indian aviation industry. This study is related to practical and genuine problem of attrition. Not many studies are found in this particular area.

Details

Business Process Management Journal, vol. 26 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-7154

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2005

Daryl May and Phil Askham

Agenda for Change is set to be the biggest reform of pay since the National Health Service (NHS) began in 1948. As well as introducing a standardised pay structure; it…

Abstract

Purpose

Agenda for Change is set to be the biggest reform of pay since the National Health Service (NHS) began in 1948. As well as introducing a standardised pay structure; it also aims to improve recruitment, retention and staff morale. Staff groups identified as having recruitment and retention problems include estates/works officers, qualified maintenance crafts persons and qualified maintenance technicians. The object of this research was to investigate recruitment and retention problems for estates and facilities staff currently experienced by Trusts.

Design/methodology/approach

Focus groups were used as the primary method of data collection in an attempt to tap into the existing expertise of staff working at strategic and operational supervisory positions in a wide range of Trusts.

Findings

Although our findings suggest that the main recruitment and retention issues fall into four main themes: social, financial, environmental and political; recruitment and retention of estates and facilities management staff is a complex problem involving a wide range of issues and these can vary from location to location. Furthermore this should also be seen as a series of issues that varies across employment groups including: domestic/housekeeping, trades, managers/officers and facilities directors, which need to be distinguished.

Practical implications

There is a continuing need to raise the profile of estates and facilities management staff in the NHS to those levels enjoyed by Human Resource (HR) and Financial Management. Furthermore perceptions surrounding both recruitment and retention issues and the nature of work within estates and facilities management staff in the NHS can lead to a negative and self‐perpetuating “cycle of failure” where there is an assumption of loss of control. However, there are some initiatives being undertaken that suggest it is possible to concentrate on internal matters such as more appropriate and flexible recruitment processes, improved support services for staff and greater flexibility within the job and that these can generate “cycles of success”.

Originality/value

The paper looks in‐depth at the current recruitment and retention problems for NHS estates and facilities staff. The paper would be of use to NHS estates and facilities managers who are currently investigating workforce issues, particularly surrounding recruitment and retention of staff.

Details

Facilities, vol. 23 no. 9/10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-2772

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Article
Publication date: 4 May 2010

Adela J. McMurray, Azharul Karim and Greg Fisher

The aims of this paper are: to investigate the perceptions held by police (insiders) and community member (outsiders) of the recruitment and retention of culturally and

Abstract

Purpose

The aims of this paper are: to investigate the perceptions held by police (insiders) and community member (outsiders) of the recruitment and retention of culturally and linguistically diverse employees of Victoria Police; and, to develop a model that can assist in future recruitment and retention policy development.

Design/methodology/approach

Structured focus group interviews were conducted based on an instrument deduced from existing literature. Police and community members were interviewed separate cohorts. The discussions were thematically coded to themes and sub‐themes.

Findings

Specific differences were identified in perceptions of the importance of recruiting culturally and linguistically diverse groups, barriers to recruitment, recruitment methods, and retention methods.

Research limitations/implications

Based on these perceptions, a proposed a model addresses the importance of cultural diversity in policing and barriers to recruitment and retention of culturally and linguistically diverse employees. Further research is necessary to assess the broader applicability of this model.

Practical implications

The proposed model may be used as the basis for future recruitment and retention activities, and human resource management policy development.

Originality/value

This is the first study in the Australian context of recruitment and retention of culturally and linguistically diverse police that addresses both community and police perspectives. Aligning the demographic profile of the police service with that of the community is beneficial to effective policing.

Details

Cross Cultural Management: An International Journal, vol. 17 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7606

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Article
Publication date: 12 June 2007

Linda Clarke and Georg Herrmann

The purpose of this paper is to show how internal and external labour markets operate in the construction sector, associated with different strategies taken by firms in…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to show how internal and external labour markets operate in the construction sector, associated with different strategies taken by firms in recruiting and retaining particular groups of employees. It draws on research of the house building sector which aims to discover how far firms develop human resource policies, recruitment and retention strategies, and training and development activities in response to skill shortages.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is based on a questionnaire survey of skills shortages, recruitment and retention in house building firms, drawn from databases of social and private housebuilders and a detailed investigation of firms.

Findings

The results show worsening skill shortages and hard‐to‐fill vacancies, particularly for site managers and tradespersons. These shortages are especially bad for house building firms, above all those with higher levels of direct employment in the social housing sector. Despite this, firms rely for operative recruitment on traditional and informal methods and procedures, on experience – not qualifications – as the main criterion, and on “poaching” – all symptomatic of a craft labour market. For managers, there is some evidence of retention measures, in particular through training and promotion, implying the development of internal labour markets. And for professionals there are indications of occupational labour markets with their dependence on institutionalised systems of training and qualifications.

Originality/value

The paper shows that firms take little responsibility themselves for resolving skill shortages and establishing training needs, though national training policy is reactive and driven by employer demand. Obligatory skills certification and an institutionalised industrial training system would facilitate a move from this deadlocked situation, from craft to occupational labour markets.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 36 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 4 May 2021

Marian Crowley-Henry, Edward P. O'Connor and Blanca Suarez-Bilbao

This micro-level study unpacks the recruitment and retention of international professionals to small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs). The study highlights the…

Abstract

Purpose

This micro-level study unpacks the recruitment and retention of international professionals to small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs). The study highlights the influence of the founders' international experience when applying organisational-level (meso) policies and practices. With their insider experience as skilled migrants, we share how the founders in each of the SMEs mobilised career capital into human resource management (HRM) strategies.

Design/methodology/approach

Combining literature on SMEs and skilled migrants' careers, we draw upon intelligent career theory to illuminate the recruitment and retention of self-initiated expatriates and skilled migrants in SMEs. With three SME case studies as samples–one micro, one small and one medium-sized organisation in Ireland–we consider the influence of the founders' international experience in the design and application of formal and informal HRM strategies (at the organisational level) that are operationalised to recruit and retain international talent to/in these organisations.

Findings

The HRM practices in the three SME cases in this paper, each run by migrant founders, vary from formalised (for our medium-sized organisation), semi-formalised (for our small-sized organisation) to ad hoc and tailor-made (for our micro-sized organisation). These particular SMEs were often more receptive to hiring other migrants. The important role of the three SME case studies' skilled migrant founders and their own international career experiences was apparent in the particular HRM approaches they adopted. The relevance of intelligent career theory when applying micro-level findings at the meso-organisational level is shown.

Originality/value

The paper presents how the international experience of founder–managers, in turn, impacts on the HRM practices and policies that are implemented to recruit and retain international employees. The study highlights how both organisation size and founder-manager international experience influence the degree of customisation of HRM practices and policies in SMEs, specifically pertaining to the recruitment and retention of self-initiated expatriates and skilled migrant employees. The heterogeneity within the sub-categories encompassed under the umbrella label of SME is emphasised; validating our case study approach, where nuance and detail of the specific organisation can be shared.

Details

Journal of Global Mobility: The Home of Expatriate Management Research, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2049-8799

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2002

Karin Newman, Uvanney Maylor and Bal Chansarkar

This paper presents the findings of a qualitative study, based on interviews with over 130 nurses and midwives in four London Trust hospitals on: the main factors…

Abstract

This paper presents the findings of a qualitative study, based on interviews with over 130 nurses and midwives in four London Trust hospitals on: the main factors influencing nurse satisfaction and retention; empirical support for the robustness of a conceptual framework or model “the nurse satisfaction, service quality and nurse retention chain”; and some managerial considerations for recruitment and retention. The three main factors influencing job satisfaction were patients, the inherent characteristics of nursing and the nursing team; the two main sources of job dissatisfaction were staff shortages and poor management and amongst nurse retention strategies improving working conditions was more important than increased pay. For recruitment, as well as retention, improving the image and reputation of nursing along with improvements in work‐life balance were pre‐requisites for meeting the challenging target of an additional 20,000 nurses on the wards by 2004.

Details

Journal of Management in Medicine, vol. 16 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-9235

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2005

Paul Verhaegen

To provide insight into the relevant factors for faculty recruitment and retention that can help leadership of business schools to design and implement a tailored policy…

Abstract

Purpose

To provide insight into the relevant factors for faculty recruitment and retention that can help leadership of business schools to design and implement a tailored policy to recruit and retain academic talent in a highly competitive and international market.

Design/methodology/approach

Two surveys were sent out in parallel to deans/directors and faculty of 181 European business schools. A total of 42 important factors were selected and ranked in order of importance for both recruitment and retention of academic talent. In addition the faculty were asked to indicate to what extent they are satisfied with each of the factors in their current situation. Deans/directors were asked to indicate to what extent they felt able to influence each of the factors.

Findings

Factors of crucial importance for recruitment and retention were identified, both from the deans and from the faculty perspective. Perception gaps occurred between deans and faculty, as well as satisfaction gaps on important factors: this led to the identification of interesting policy problems and opportunities. Segmentation of the sample facilitated the demonstration of differences in perception between groups of faculty according to gender, age and rank, and between groups of schools according to legal structure, orientation, enrolment, and accreditation status.

Research limitations/implications

Deans/directors of 69 European schools and 350 faculty members in 12 countries completed the survey. The database could be further enlarged to make more detailed analysis possible. Expanding the research to include schools of other continents would enable one to analyse cross‐continent differences between business schools.

Practical implications

The developed framework and the data provide an excellent opportunity for business schools' leadership to analyze the effectiveness of its policy and benchmark the school against a selected peer group.

Originality/value

The survey and the developed framework for analysis are unique and, in this form, have never been done before. The value of the paper is that it presents unique evidence on important factors crucial to faculty management.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 24 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 June 2017

Briliya Devadas

The purpose of this study is to investigate factors surrounding low Emirati student recruitment and retention within a nursing programme in the Abu Dhabi Emirate. A…

Abstract

The purpose of this study is to investigate factors surrounding low Emirati student recruitment and retention within a nursing programme in the Abu Dhabi Emirate. A sequential explanatory mixed methods research design was used to collect data from 140 Emirati students at different levels of the nursing program. Questionnaires, semi-structured interviews and related document analyses were used to collect information for this study. Quantitative analysis revealed that overall participants perceived the Emirati society as holding a positive image of nursing, though a majority of them indicated that nursing as a profession, would be a third or last choice of career for them. Inferential analysis on the reasons to choose or not choose nursing, revealed an opportunity to work as part of the team; and as a stepping stone to other professions as significant reasons, versus perceived program difficulty level, and perceived unpleasant tasks. Thematic analysis of interviews highlighted: 1) personal interest; 2) parental support; 3) awareness of the profession; 4) perceived barriers; 5) potential benefits, and 6) policies at the local and national levels. The study has several implications for nursing education and policy in the United Arab Emirates and the region.

.يبظوبأ ةرامإ يف ضيرمتلا جمانرب نمض مهب ظافتحﻻاو نييتارامﻹا ةبلطلا ددع ةلقب ةطيحملا لماوعلا ةسارد وه ةساردلا هذه نم ضرغلا نم تانايبلا عيمجتل ةطلتخم قرط يف لسلستم يثحب ميمصت مادختسا مت دقو 140 .ضيرمتلا جمانرب تايوتسم فلتخم ىلع ايتارامإ ابلاط تسﻻا تلمعتسا ةيبلغأ نأ يمكلا ليلحتلا فشك و .ةساردلا هذهل تامولعملا عمجل ةلصلا تاذ قئاثولا تﻼيلحتو ةمظنملا هبش تﻼباقملاو تانايب ضيرمتلا نأ ىلإ تراشأ مهتيبلغأ نأ نم مغرلا ىلع ،ضيرمتلل ةيباجيإ ةروص لمحي هنأ ىلع يتارامﻹا عمتجملا ىلإ نورظني نيكراشملا مهرايخ نوكيس ،ةنهمك ضيرمتلا رايتخا مدع وأ رايتخا بابسﻷ يلﻻدتسﻻا ليلحتلا يف و .مهل ةبسنلاب ةيفيظولا ةايحلا نم ريخﻷا وأ ثلاثلا ةماه ةيباجيإ بابسأك ،ىرخأ نهمل قﻼطنا ةطقنك وأ ؛قيرفلا نم ءزجك لمعلل ةصرف نع جئاتنلا تفشك ،ةيبلسلاو ةيباجيﻹا بابسﻷا لباقم ا يف و،ضيرمتلا رايتخﻻ رايتخا مدعل ةريبك ةيبلس بابسأ اهنأ ىلع ، اهيف بوغرملا ريغ ماهملاو ،جمانربلا ةبوعص ىوتسم ىلإ رظنلا ،لباقمل :تﻼباقملل يعيضاوملا ليلحتلا زربأو .ةنهمك ضيرمتلا 1 ( ؛ةيصخشلا ةحلصملا 2 ( ؛نيدلاولا معد 3 ( ةنهملاب يعولا ؛ 4 ( ؛ةعقوتملا زجاوحلا 5 ( و ،ةلمتحملا دئاوفلا 6 ( ةلود يف هتاسايسو ضيرمتلا ميلعت ىلع تاروصت ةدع ةساردلا هذهلو .ينطولاو يلحملا نييوتسملا ىلع تاسايسلا ةقطنملاو ةدحتملا ةيبرعلا تارامﻹا .

Details

Learning and Teaching in Higher Education: Gulf Perspectives, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2077-5504

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2006

Andrew Martin, Deirdre Mactaggart and Jiaolan Bowden

The primary objective of this study was to examine, from the supervisors/managers' perspective, the impacting factors and barriers on their recruitment and retention in…

Abstract

Purpose

The primary objective of this study was to examine, from the supervisors/managers' perspective, the impacting factors and barriers on their recruitment and retention in the Scottish tourism industry.

Design/methodology/approach

The information in this analysis was elicited from a questionnaire survey and analysed using factor analysis and significance test.

Findings

The analysis of the responses supports the separation of the hygiene (such as “working conditions”) and motivator factors (such as “image of the tourism industry” and “development opportunities”) as represented by Herzberg's dual‐factor motivational theory; and strengthens the belief that the latter is more significant in the recruitment and retention of tourism managerial staff.

Research limitations/implications

The major limitation is the sampling framework and the data collection methods. These restricted the choice of the analysing techniques and might ultimately affect the interpretation of the research results.

Practical implications

This research aims to alert policy‐makers to some of the key barriers to the employment of qualified tourism staff in Scotland and assist with their decision‐making process.

Originality/value

As highlighted, the research provides insights to tourism practitioners in understanding and tackling the problems facing tourism employment in Scotland; it also provides some empirical evidence to tourism researchers in their theoretical understanding of the motivation and satisfaction of tourism managerial staff.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 18 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

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