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1 – 10 of 66
Article
Publication date: 6 August 2019

Cristina M. Giannantonio, Amy E. Hurley-Hanson, Sharon L. Segrest, Pamela L. Perrewé and Gerald R. Ferris

The purpose of this paper is to gain a better understanding of the effects of recruiter friendliness and both verifiable and non-verifiable job attributes in the…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to gain a better understanding of the effects of recruiter friendliness and both verifiable and non-verifiable job attributes in the recruitment process.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 498 participants watched a videoed simulation of a recruitment interview and completed a questionnaire. Three-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to test the interaction and main effect hypotheses.

Findings

Applicant reactions were more favorable with a friendly recruiter. The more favorable the verifiable job attribute information (JAI), the more favorable the applicant reactions were to the employment opportunity. Compared to applicants who received negative or no non-verifiable JAI, applicants who received positive or mixed non-verifiable JAI were more attracted to the recruiter, perceived the employment opportunity as more desirable, and were more willing to pursue the employment opportunity. Reactions were most favorable in the positive non-verifiable JAI condition, less favorable in the mixed condition, and least favorable in the negative condition. Surprisingly, the “no information” mean was above the negative information condition.

Originality/value

This fully crossed 2 × 3 × 4 experiment simultaneously examined 2 levels of recruiter friendliness, 3 levels of verifiable job attributes and 4 levels of non-verifiable job attributes. The five dependent variables were attraction to the recruiter, attraction to the employment opportunity, willingness to pursue the employment opportunity, the perceived probability of receiving a job offer and the number of positive inferences made about unknown organizational characteristics. Previous research examining the effects of employment inducements and job attributes were conducted in field settings where it is difficult to control the amount and favorability of JAI applicants receive.

Article
Publication date: 20 August 2019

Diane Lawong, Gerald R. Ferris, Wayne Hochwarter and Liam Maher

Researchers have identified various recruiter and organization characteristics that individually influence staffing effectiveness. In extending contemporary research, the…

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Abstract

Purpose

Researchers have identified various recruiter and organization characteristics that individually influence staffing effectiveness. In extending contemporary research, the purpose of this paper is to address a straightforward question unexamined in previous research, namely, does recruiter political skill interact with organization reputation to influence applicant attraction in the recruitment process? Specifically, the authors hypothesized that for recruiters high in political skill, as organization reputation increases, applicant attraction to the organization increases. Alternatively, for recruiters low in political skill, as organization reputation increases, there is no change in applicant attraction to the organization.

Design/methodology/approach

Three studies were conducted to create the experimental manipulation materials, pilot test them and then conduct tests of the hypotheses. Study 1 created and tested the content validity of the recruiter political skill script. Study 2 reported on the effectiveness of the recruiter political skill experimental manipulation, whereby a male actor was hired to play the part of a recruiter high in political skill and one low in political skill. Finally, Study 3 was the primary hypothesis testing investigation.

Findings

Results from a 2×2 between-subjects experimental study (N=576) supported the hypotheses. Specifically, high recruiter political skill and favorable organization reputation each demonstrated significant main effects on applicant attraction to the organization. Additionally, the authors hypothesized, and confirmed, a significant organization reputation × recruiter political skill interaction. Specifically, findings demonstrated that increases in organization reputation resulted in increased applicant attraction to the organization for those exposed to a recruiter high in political skill. However, the effect was not for a recruiter low in political skill.

Research limitations/implications

Despite the single source nature of data collections, the authors took steps to minimize potential biasing factors (e.g. time separation, including affectivity). Future research will benefit from gathering multiple sources of data. In addition, no experimental research to date exists, examining political skill in a laboratory context. This finding has important implications for the growing research base on political skill in organizations.

Practical implications

First impressions are lasting impressions, and it is very costly to organizations when recruiters lose good candidates due to the failure to make a memorable and favorable impression. This paper supports the use of political skill in the recruitment process and highlights its capability to influence and attract job applicants to organizations successfully.

Originality/value

Despite its scientific and practical appeal, the causal effects of political skill on important work outcomes in an experimental setting have not been formally investigated. As the first experimental investigation of political skill, the authors can see more clearly and precisely what political skill behaviors of recruiters tend to influence applicant attraction to organizations in the recruitment process.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 24 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 August 2006

Amy E. Hurley‐Hanson and Cristina M. Giannantonio

To introduce a model which examines the relationship between recruiters’ perceptions of image and the stigma of image norms.

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Abstract

Purpose

To introduce a model which examines the relationship between recruiters’ perceptions of image and the stigma of image norms.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper examines the influence of image norms on recruiters’ perceptions of applicants during interviews and explores the manner in which recruiters may stigmatize applicants. A model is presented which explores how image norms may be used to stigmatize applicants and affect recruiters’ decisions.

Findings

Image norms are found to have an influence on recruiters’ evaluations of applicants during the interview process.

Research limitations/implications

Empirical tests of the model are suggested to illustrate how image norm violations lead to stigmatization during the recruitment process.

Practical implications

Applicants who are denied entry into organizations on the basis of their appearance or image, experience a subtle, yet unacceptable form of employment discrimination. Organizations need to ensure that they are not excluding potential employees who do not meet the image norm expectations of recruiters. Organizations need to make sure that the image norms used to evaluate applicants are not a proxy for discrimination based on protected characteristics.

Originality/value

This paper looks at image, a broader construct than physical attractiveness, to ensure equal opportunities for everyone. This is the first paper to consider the discriminatory effects of image in organizations.

Details

Equal Opportunities International, vol. 25 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0261-0159

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 August 1996

Androniki Papadopoulou, Elizabeth Ineson and David Williams

Describes a study which aimed to capture the candidates’ perceptions of a graduate employment interview, in particular how the interviewer’s manner and ability may affect…

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Abstract

Describes a study which aimed to capture the candidates’ perceptions of a graduate employment interview, in particular how the interviewer’s manner and ability may affect interview outcomes. Eighty‐seven questionnaires were received from graduate candidates immediately after their interviews with an international retailing company based in the UK. Factor analysis produced five factors relating to “interpersonal manner” and two relating to “ability to communicate”. Outlines the findings which were that: the impact made by the interviewer was a function of his/her professional style rather than his/her empathetic behaviour; the degree of empathy shown by the interviewer affected the interviewees’ perceptions of the interviewer’s competence as a supplier of information; and overall satisfaction with the interview was a function of the empathetic behaviour of the interviewer. Discusses the findings in the framework of the “signalling hypothesis” and other communication literature.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 25 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 12 October 2012

Evanthia Faliagka, Athanasios Tsakalidis and Giannis Tzimas

The purpose of this paper is to present a novel approach for recruiting and ranking job applicants in online recruitment systems, with the objective to automate applicant…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present a novel approach for recruiting and ranking job applicants in online recruitment systems, with the objective to automate applicant pre‐screening. An integrated, company‐oriented, e‐recruitment system was implemented based on the proposed scheme and its functionality was showcased and evaluated in a real‐world recruitment scenario.

Design/methodology/approach

The proposed system implements automated candidate ranking, based on objective criteria that can be extracted from the applicant's LinkedIn profile. What is more, candidate personality traits are automatically extracted from his/her social presence using linguistic analysis. The applicant's rank is derived from individual selection criteria using analytical hierarchy process (AHP), while their relative significance (weight) is controlled by the recruiter.

Findings

The proposed e‐recruitment system was deployed in a real‐world recruitment scenario, and its output was validated by expert recruiters. It was found that with the exception of senior positions that required domain experience and specific qualifications, automated pre‐screening performed consistently compared to human recruiters.

Research limitations/implications

It was found that companies can increase the efficiency of the recruitment process if they integrate an e‐recruitment system in their human resources management infrastructure that automates the candidate pre‐screening process. Interviewing and background investigation of applicants can then be limited to the top candidates identified from the system.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first e‐recruitment system that supports automated extraction of candidate personality traits using linguistic analysis and ranks candidates with the AHP.

Article
Publication date: 7 October 2020

Melanie F. Boninsegni, Olivier Furrer and Anna S. Mattila

This article explores four dimensions of frontline employee (FLE) friendliness (humorous, informal, conversational, and approachable) to propose a relevant measurement…

Abstract

Purpose

This article explores four dimensions of frontline employee (FLE) friendliness (humorous, informal, conversational, and approachable) to propose a relevant measurement instrument of the influence of FLE friendliness on relationship quality and perceived value, as well as its indirect influence on repatronage intentions. Recent studies suggest FLE friendliness, defined as a tendency to convey an affective customer–employee social interaction, is a critical determinant of relationship marketing, but few scholars agree on its dimensionality. This study seeks a deeper understanding of FLE friendliness by investigating its different dimensions in various service contexts.

Design/methodology/approach

The mixed-method design, including both qualitative and quantitative research, offers a deeper understanding of the phenomenon of FLE friendliness.

Findings

The content analysis suggests FLE friendliness is multidimensional and composed of humorous, informal, conversational, and approachable behaviors. The results of a quantitative survey, conducted across four service contexts, validate this four-factor model. A second quantitative survey across two service contexts reveals the weights and relative importance of the dimensions, and then a third quantitative survey across three service contexts confirms that FLE friendliness is a significant driver of relationship quality, perceived value, and repatronage intentions (indirectly).

Originality/value

This study contributes to relationship marketing literature by strengthening the conceptual foundations of FLE friendliness, clarifying the dimensionality of the construct, developing a comprehensive measurement instrument, and extending previous research on the customer–employee interactions.

Details

Journal of Service Management, vol. 32 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-5818

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 17 August 2015

Jason R. Lambert

Using early recruitment and workplace diversity literature, the purpose of this paper is to investigate how employee recruitment statements regarding employment-at-will…

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Abstract

Purpose

Using early recruitment and workplace diversity literature, the purpose of this paper is to investigate how employee recruitment statements regarding employment-at-will moderate the effect that gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgender (GLBT)-supportive recruitment statements have on job seekers’ job pursuit intentions (JPI) and attraction toward a firm.

Design/methodology/approach

A between-subjects, cross-sectional experimental design was used where subjects answered self-report questionnaires after viewing mock recruitment web ads. The ads included statements where the condition for job security or at-will employment and GLBT-supportive or equal opportunity employment climates were manipulated.

Findings

The paper provides empirical insights about how gay-friendly work climate perceptions impact the organizational attractiveness and JPI of job seekers. Furthermore, the results suggest that the combination of recruitment strategies affect subjects differently based on their individual level of heterosexist attitudes.

Research limitations/implications

Because of the chosen research approach, research results may lack generalizability and be affected by social desirability effects. Because a cross-sectional design was used, causality cannot necessarily be inferred. Therefore, researchers are encouraged to test the proposed propositions further.

Practical implications

The implications of these findings will assist human resources managers in creating cultures of tolerance within their workforce by helping them better understand who their recruitment methods target, and how to effectively use statements in recruitment literature to attract tolerant workers.

Originality/value

There is limited research that investigates the effects that diversity statements supportive of sexual minorities have on job seekers. A major contribution of the current study is the empirical evidence supporting the understanding of how individuals are affected by recruitment literature containing statements in support of sexual orientation employee diversity.

Details

Equality, Diversity and Inclusion: An International Journal, vol. 34 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-7149

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1971

William Glueck

Recently, a great deal of interest has been shown in Britain and elsewhere to recruiting of MBAs and college qualified individuals to the firm. Older methods, such as…

Abstract

Recently, a great deal of interest has been shown in Britain and elsewhere to recruiting of MBAs and college qualified individuals to the firm. Older methods, such as advertising the positions and word of mouth advertising, have been supplemented by methods something like American recruiting practice. The Editors beleive it is of value to readers of Management Decision to learn of the results of some research which the author has completed on this topic, for if British firms do change to this system they might avoid some of the pitfalls that some U.S. firms have had to overcome.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Book part
Publication date: 9 August 2017

Francesca Mochi, Rita Bissola and Barbara Imperatori

This chapter explores different strategies implemented by three companies using professional (LinkedIn) and non-professional (Facebook) social networking websites (SNWs…

Abstract

Purpose

This chapter explores different strategies implemented by three companies using professional (LinkedIn) and non-professional (Facebook) social networking websites (SNWs) as a recruitment tool and investigates the influence of their perceived usability and attractiveness on job seekers’ attraction and their intention to apply.

Methodology/approach

First, a laboratory experiment involving 171 MBA students compares the effectiveness of three different social recruitment strategies. Second, a survey among 110 job seekers focuses on the most effective strategy in terms of attraction as an employer and the influence of perceived usability and attractiveness of professional SNW pages on job seekers’ intention to pursue the job.

Findings

The laboratory experiment confirms the key role of LinkedIn as an e-recruitment practice. The survey shows that the overall company image, the usability of the LinkedIn page and the interaction between the attractiveness of the page and the overall company image positively influence job seekers’ intention to pursue the job.

Social implications

The research offers insights on job seekers’ reactions to 2.0 Internet-based recruitment. Companies should focus on and invest in professional social medias, paying attention to the usability of their SNWs pages.

Originality/value of the chapter

Recruitment is a strategic HRM practice to attract talents; however, research lags behind practice and little is known about job seekers’ perceptions and reactions to Internet recruitment. This chapter sheds light on the use of social media for recruitment and identifies two features that contribute to an effective e-recruitment strategy.

Details

Electronic HRM in the Smart Era
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-315-9

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 18 February 2021

Andrea Strinić, Magnus Carlsson and Jens Agerström

The purpose of the current study is to investigate occupational stereotypes among a professional sample of recruiters and other employees on the two fundamental dimensions…

1972

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the current study is to investigate occupational stereotypes among a professional sample of recruiters and other employees on the two fundamental dimensions of warmth and competence.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors conducted a survey to collect professionals´ (mostly recruiters´) ratings of preselected occupations. Participants were asked to rate warmth and competence attributes. Factor and cluster analysis were employed to investigate the two-dimensional structure of the warmth/competence space and how and whether occupations cluster as predicted by the stereotype content model (SCM).

Findings

Almost all occupations showed a clear two-factorial structure, corresponding to the warmth/competence dimensions. A five-cluster solution was deemed appropriate as depicting how occupations disperse on these dimensions. Implications for stereotyping research, the design of hiring discrimination experiments, and HRM are discussed.

Originality/value

In contrast to previous related research, in which participants select the included occupations themselves, the authors included prespecified common occupations, which should be important for representativeness. In addition, previous research has been conducted in the United States, while the authors conduct this study in a European context (Sweden). Finally, instead of studying students or participants with unspecified work experience, the authors focus on professionals (mostly recruiters).

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 51 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

1 – 10 of 66