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Article
Publication date: 14 September 2015

Douglas Polcin

Persons with serious alcohol and drug problems who are attempting to maintain abstinence often lack an alcohol- and drug-free living environment that supports sustained…

Abstract

Purpose

Persons with serious alcohol and drug problems who are attempting to maintain abstinence often lack an alcohol- and drug-free living environment that supports sustained recovery. Residential recovery homes, called “sober living houses” in California, are alcohol- and drug-free living environments that offer long-term support for persons with addictive disorders. They do not offer formal treatment services but usually encourage or mandate attendance at self-help recovery groups such as Alcoholics Anonymous. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

The approach involved analysis of the strengths and weaknesses of different research designs for studying residential recovery homes. Alternatives to randomized designs that are able to capture “real world” data that are readily generalized are described and understudied topics are identified.

Findings

A significant limitation of traditional randomized designs is they eliminate mutual selection processes between prospective residents and recovery home residents and staff. Naturalistic research designs have the advantage of including mutual selection processes and there are methods available for limiting self-selection bias. Qualitative methods should be used to identify factors that residents experience as helpful that can then be studied further. Innovative studies are needed to investigate how outcomes are affected by architectural characteristics of the houses and resident interactions with the surrounding community.

Practical implications

Use of the recommended strategies could lead to findings that are more informative, intuitively appealing, and interpretable.

Social implications

Recovery homes and similar programs will be more responsive to consumers.

Originality/value

This paper represents one of the first to review various options for studying recovery homes and to provide suggestions for new studies.

Details

Therapeutic Communities: The International Journal of Therapeutic Communities, vol. 36 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0964-1866

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 14 June 2021

John M. Majer, Ted J. Bobak and Leonard A. Jason

The purpose of this study is to examine the relationship between psychiatric severity and stress among persons utilizing medication assisted treatment (MAT), and there is…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine the relationship between psychiatric severity and stress among persons utilizing medication assisted treatment (MAT), and there is a need to identify resources that promote resilience against these risk factors. Although recovery homes might complement pharmacological interventions for persons using MAT, a lack of homophily (e.g. similar experiences) among residents could produce stress and increase psychiatric severity. The purpose of this paper is to examine stress and psychiatric severity in relation to recovery outcomes, and whether homophily moderated these relationships.

Design/methodology/approach

A cross-sectional analysis was conducted among recovery home residents who were recruited from the USA, including those using (n = 40) and not using (n = 132) MAT. Participants’ levels of psychiatric severity, stress, abstinence self-efficacy and quality of life were assessed in addition to whether residents using MAT were living with at least one other resident who used MAT. Moderated mediation analyses were conducted to examine whether homophily among residents using MAT would moderate the mediating effects of stress on the relationships between psychiatric severity and recovery outcomes (abstinence-self efficacy, quality of life).

Findings

Mediating effects were observed but they were significant only through homophily. Although stress increased the negative effects of psychiatric severity among residents using MAT, significantly lesser effects were observed among those living with residents using MAT.

Practical implications

Although psychiatric (problem) severity and stress threaten recovery for persons with substance use disorders, little is known how they impact recovery among those living in community-based settings such as recovery homes. In addition, there is a need to identify community resources that would complement MAT protocols, as patients who use MAT face unique stressors related to their sense of shared interests and experiences (i.e. homophily) when developing social bonds with others in recovery.

Social implications

This study suggests the social networks within recovery homes reduce the effects of psychiatric severity and stress, and that these effects are lessened for residents who use MAT when they live with others who also use MAT.

Originality/value

Little is known about recovery home residents who use MAT and have high psychiatric severity. Findings suggest homophily among persons using MAT living in recovery homes who have high psychiatric severity can promote resilience.

Article
Publication date: 1 December 1997

Shirley Wong and Julia Wong

Total hip replacement is a common and expensive procedure. Any attempt to shorten the length of hospital stay safely is desirable. Proposes a scoring system specifically…

797

Abstract

Total hip replacement is a common and expensive procedure. Any attempt to shorten the length of hospital stay safely is desirable. Proposes a scoring system specifically designed for this patient population, to determine the optimal timing of safe discharge and post‐acute care placement. Discusses its implications for the quality of patient care.

Details

Leadership in Health Services, vol. 10 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-0756

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 30 December 2019

Susan Griffin, Leigh McGrath, Gregory T. Chesnut, Nicole Benfante, Melissa Assel, Aaron Ostrovsky, Marcia Levine, Andrew Vickers, Brett Simon and Vincent Laudone

The purpose of this paper is to determine the impact of having a patient-designated caregiver remain overnight with ambulatory extended recovery patients on early…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to determine the impact of having a patient-designated caregiver remain overnight with ambulatory extended recovery patients on early postoperative clinical outcomes.

Design/methodology/approach

This was a retrospective cohort study of patients undergoing surgery requiring overnight stay in a highly resourced free-standing oncology ambulatory surgery center. Postoperative outcomes in patients who had caregivers stay with them overnight were compared with outcomes in those who did not. All other care was standardized. Primary outcomes were postoperative length of stay, hospital readmission rates, urgent care center (UCC) visits within 30 days and perioperative complication rates.

Findings

Among patients staying overnight, 2,462 (57 percent) were accompanied by overnight caregivers. In this group, time to discharge was significantly lower. Readmissions (though rare) were slightly higher, though the difference was not statistically significant (p=0.059). No difference in early (<30 day) complications or UCC visits was noted. Presence of a caregiver overnight was not associated with important differences in outcomes, though further research in a less well-structured environment is likely to show a more robust benefit. Caregivers are still recommended to stay overnight if that is their preference as no harm was identified.

Originality/value

This study is unique in its evaluation of the clinical impact of having a caregiver stay overnight with ambulatory surgery patients. Little research has focused on the direct impact of the caregiver on patient outcomes, especially in the ambulatory setting. With increased adoption of minimally invasive surgical techniques and enhanced recovery pathways, a larger number of patients are eligible for short-stay ambulatory surgery. Factors that impact discharge and early postoperative complications are important.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 33 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 December 1999

Julia Wong and Shirley Wong

Total hip replacement is a common and expensive procedure and any attempt to shorten the length of hospital stay safely is desirable. This paper proposes a scoring system…

565

Abstract

Total hip replacement is a common and expensive procedure and any attempt to shorten the length of hospital stay safely is desirable. This paper proposes a scoring system specifically designed for this patient population, to determine the optimal timing of safe discharge and post‐acute care placement. The authors discuss the implications for the quality of patient care.

Details

British Journal of Clinical Governance, vol. 4 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1466-4100

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 19 May 2009

Fabienne T. Amstad and Norbert K. Semmer

Recovery seems to be one of the most important mechanisms explaining the relationship between acute stress reactions and chronic health complaints (Geurts & Sonnentag, 2006

Abstract

Recovery seems to be one of the most important mechanisms explaining the relationship between acute stress reactions and chronic health complaints (Geurts & Sonnentag, 2006). Moreover, insufficient recovery may be the linking mechanism that turns daily stress experiences into chronic stress. Given this role recovery has in the stress process, it is important to ask in which contexts and under what circumstances recovery takes place.

Details

Current Perspectives on Job-Stress Recovery
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84855-544-0

Article
Publication date: 26 May 2022

Pejman Rezakhani

This paper aims to examine how neighborhood characteristics (income, population composition) and individual building attributes (ownership) affect the recovery period of…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine how neighborhood characteristics (income, population composition) and individual building attributes (ownership) affect the recovery period of single-family housing and determine their correlations with property abandonment and changes in residential land use after natural disaster.

Design/methodology/approach

This empirical study focuses on Valley Fire, one of the California’s most destructive wildfires in 2015, and uses assessor, community, demographic and sales data to measure recovery of a panel of single-family houses located in Lake County in California between 2012 and 2020. Several regression and correlation models will be developed to test different hypotheses.

Findings

This study found that: Recovery period is longer than what expected in most existing literature; ownership status significantly affects recovery period; income level is not a significant factor for shortening the recovery period; and minorities may need more assistance for constant recovery. Findings of this research will help identify at risk communities to avoid uneven housing recovery and lower the rate of property abandonment.

Originality/value

Housing recovery is key to revitalizing communities following major natural disasters. The sociodemographic characteristics of each neighborhood have significant impact on the duration of recovery and possible property abandonment. Understanding how home and neighborhood characteristics affect recovery will help planners prevent long-lasting adverse effects of natural disasters.

Details

International Journal of Disaster Resilience in the Built Environment, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-5908

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 3 June 2014

Nicole Shepherd, Tom Meehan and Seiji Humphries

The concept of recovery is well accepted internationally as a guiding vision for mental health services. The purpose of this paper is to highlight the challenges faced by…

Abstract

Purpose

The concept of recovery is well accepted internationally as a guiding vision for mental health services. The purpose of this paper is to highlight the challenges faced by in-home psychiatric support workers in implementing this vision in their work with clients with severe psychiatric disability.

Design/methodology/approach

The findings reported here are based on interviews with 27 support workers and ten managers of organisations providing support services. These were collected as part of evaluations of two supported housing programmes carried out between 2010 and 2011.

Findings

Challenges faced by support workers coalesced around two areas: first, balancing the need to provide care with the need to promote autonomy and second, developing an effective working relationship while working mainly within a clients’ home.

Practical implications

These challenges for support workers highlight tensions within the recovery vision that are not easily resolved. To ensure high quality, recovery-oriented care services are provided, support workers need access to training courses that focus on challenging areas of this work and should be provided with regular professional supervision.

Originality/value

Existing literature on support workers has generally focused on the nature of the role and support worker interactions with other health workers. In this paper, the authors highlight difficulties faced by support workers in implementing the vision of recovery in their work. The paper provides important information for policy makers and managers who are designing service delivery systems that aim to promote recovery.

Details

Mental Health Review Journal, vol. 19 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-9322

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 25 January 2022

Malliga Marimuthu, Seyedeh Khadijeh Taghizadeh and Jay Kandampully

This study has conceptualized and empirically investigated how the psychological empowerment process is generated from a patient's cognitive knowledge and participation at…

Abstract

Purpose

This study has conceptualized and empirically investigated how the psychological empowerment process is generated from a patient's cognitive knowledge and participation at different recovery places that results in a state of empowerment and predicts positive outcomes.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from 150 physiotherapy outpatients who have been attending a series of physiotherapy courses at clinic and concurrently progressing with home physio exercise plan. Data were analyzed using structural equation modeling (SEM) with SmartPLS software.

Findings

The results reveal that psychological empowerment best formed when patient centric knowledge is combined with place-based behavioral experiences that are gathered via healthcare encounters and experience patient gained outside of the clinic. Patients' involvement at different environmental settings contributes to patients' empowerment which further assists their well-being.

Practical implications

Understanding the process of empowerment in different environmental contexts can help healthcare organizations to better design patient empowerment strategies and support patients through the empowerment journey to demonstrate their capability to achieve more effective health recovery outcomes.

Originality/value

Patient empowerment is a concept of growing importance in the healthcare industry, yet the journey about how patients are being empowered within their sphere has not been well studied in the past. To the authors' knowledge, this study is the first study that discusses the utilization of patient empowerment must be aimed at both the process and the outcomes. This study provides empirical insights to understand the factors that formulate patient empowerment and predicts positive patient outcomes such as feelings of well-being.

Details

The TQM Journal, vol. 34 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2731

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 28 September 2012

Asal Kamani‐Fard, Mohd Hamdan Ahmad and Dilshan Remaz Ossen

The purpose of this paper is to study the efforts of the 2003 Bam earthquake survivors and their strategy for coping with home loss. Regarding the key role of the sense of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to study the efforts of the 2003 Bam earthquake survivors and their strategy for coping with home loss. Regarding the key role of the sense of place within the recovery process following the disaster, this paper considers the characteristics of lost settings located in a desert area while searching for the factors that made an impact on householders' perception of newly built houses.

Design/methodology/approach

On the basis of the field survey, a group of 186 households were selected by the probability sampling method. Accordingly, the random selection of residents was organized within the three defined zones of the city that had experienced different degrees of building damages. Data were collected using a face‐to‐face communication approach with the target group of owners of self‐built houses.

Findings

The findings indicate that households tend to arrange the new settings on the basis of their perceptions of home place as well as the experience of loss during the quake. It also confirms that owners' participation in housing reconstruction process within setting arrangement has a significant positive impact on their attitude toward newly built homes.

Originality/value

Due to the widespread incidence of natural disasters and in the light of the key role of home place in the existence of human beings and their recovery process, the opportunity for local participation in new housing is highlighted as a means to overcome the challenges faced.

Details

International Journal of Disaster Resilience in the Built Environment, vol. 3 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-5908

Keywords

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