Search results

1 – 10 of over 35000
Article
Publication date: 13 July 2012

Emily Handley, Olivia Southwell and Julie Steel

Given the increased prevalence of mental health problems amongst people with intellectual disabilities, it seems pertinent to consider how the recovery approach could…

1034

Abstract

Purpose

Given the increased prevalence of mental health problems amongst people with intellectual disabilities, it seems pertinent to consider how the recovery approach could potentially benefit practice within mental health services for people with intellectual disabilities. This paper seeks to explore the similarities between recovery principles and existing approaches in services for people with intellectual disabilities; it also aims to reflect on the potential barriers to the explicit uptake of the “recoveryapproach in this context.

Design/methodology/approach

The presence and implementation of “recoveryapproaches within mental health services for people with intellectual disabilities are reviewed. This is achieved through an examination of existing practices that could be described as recovery oriented, along with reflections on how these relate to the recovery approach. Questions are raised regarding whether practices can be regarded as “recovery oriented”, without first consulting service users.

Findings

Further consideration is needed about the extent to which mental health services for people with intellectual disabilities are recovery oriented and how recovery would be defined amongst people with intellectual disabilities.

Research limitations/implications

It is suggested that further research using qualitative methodology is conducted, to enable the voice of service users to be heard.

Originality/value

The paper is one of the first to explore the relevance of the recovery approach to people with intellectual disabilities. Given the increasing emphasis on recovery approaches within mainstream services, it seems vital to give consideration to the potential for its meaningful application to people with intellectual disabilities and mental health problems.

Details

Advances in Mental Health and Intellectual Disabilities, vol. 6 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-1282

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 March 2012

Fola Esan, Katie Case, Jacques Louis, Jemma Kirby, Lucinda Cheshire, Jannette Keefe and Maggie Petty

This paper aims to describe how a patient centred recovery approach was implemented in a secure learning disabilities service.

448

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to describe how a patient centred recovery approach was implemented in a secure learning disabilities service.

Design/methodology/approach

There are no specific tools for measuring recovery in a secure learning disabilities service. The Recovery Star; a measure of individual recovery was adopted for use among the patients. Staff underwent training on the use of the Recovery Star tool after which a multidisciplinary steering group made some modifications to the tool. Training was cascaded to staff throughout the service and use of the Recovery Star tool was embedded in the care programme approach process.

Findings

It was found that implementing a recovery approach with the Recovery Star tool was a beneficial process for the service but that services will require a whole systems approach to implementing recovery. Key workers working with patients thought that the structure of the Recovery Star tool opened up avenues for discussing topics covered in the domains of the Recovery Star tool which may otherwise have not been discussed as fully.

Practical implications

The availability of a tool, integrated into existing service processes, e.g. care programme approach and accompanied by a systems approach, equips patients and staff for articulating and measuring the recovery journey.

Originality/value

The paper shows that the Recovery Star tool, embedded in a care programme approach process, equips patients and staff for measuring the recovery journey.

Details

Journal of Learning Disabilities and Offending Behaviour, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-0927

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 4 November 2014

Mark Chandley, Maxine Cromar-Hayes, Dave Mercer, Bridget Clancy, Iain Wilkie and Gary Thorpe

The purpose of this paper is to derive from an on-going, innovative, project to explore the concept, and application, of “recovery” in the care and clinical management of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to derive from an on-going, innovative, project to explore the concept, and application, of “recovery” in the care and clinical management of patients detained in one UK high-security hospital.

Design/methodology/approach

Utilising a qualitative, action research, methodology the aim was to involve forensic mental health nurses in a collaborative, client-centred approach to identification and resolution of dilemmas in the process of planning care for offender-patients.

Findings

In this context the authors identify constraints and contradictions involved in employing recovery principles in institutions critics refer to as part of the disciplinary apparatus of psychiatric and social control; where the taken for granted lives, and relations, of an incarcerated population are measured by the calendar, not the clock.

Research limitations/implications

Protective practices remain highly relevant in high-secure practice. Safety, an important value for all can by and large be achieved through recovery approaches. The humanistic elements of recovery can offer up safe and useful methods of deploying the mental health nurse on the ward. Many nurses have the prerequisite approach but there remains a wide scope to enhance those skills. Many see the approach as axiomatic though nurse education often prepares nurses with a biomedical view of the ward.

Practical implications

Currently, philosophical tenets of recovery are enshrined in contemporary health policy and professional directives but, as yet, have not been translated into high-secure settings. Drawing on preliminary findings, attention is given to the value of socially situated approaches in challenging historic dominance of a medical model.

Social implications

It is concluded that recovery could be a forerunner of reforms necessary for the continued relevance of high-secure care into the twenty-first century.

Originality/value

This research is located in high-secure setting. The social situation is marked by the extent of the isolation involved. A value is in this situation. First it is akin to the isolation of the tribe utilised by many anthropologists for their ability to adopt the “social laboratory” status to test out theories of behaviour in industrial society. The authors urge others to utilise this research in this way. Second, the situation represents the locus of so many of societies dilemmas, paradoxes and fears that moral issues morph from what is the mundane in wider society. In this way humanistic approaches are tested via action research with nurses in some rigouous ways.

Details

Mental Health and Social Inclusion, vol. 18 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-8308

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 29 August 2019

Negar Shaaban, Majid Nojavan and Davood Mohammaditabar

The purpose of this paper is to investigate a fuzzy hybrid approach for ranking the flare gas recovery methods and allocating to refineries.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate a fuzzy hybrid approach for ranking the flare gas recovery methods and allocating to refineries.

Design/methodology/approach

The proposed approach is containing four stages: in the first stage, experts' assessment is applied to identify relevant criteria and sub-criteria in the evaluation of flare gas recovery methods. In the second stage, the corresponding weights of criteria and sub-criteria are determined via fuzzy decision-making trial and evaluation (DEMATEL)-analytical network process (ANP) (DANP) method. In the third stage, the flare gas recovery methods are ranked using fuzzy weighted aggregated sum product assessment method (WASPAS) multi-criteria decision-making (MADM) technique. In the fourth stage, an optimization model is developed to allocate gas recovery methods to refineries while maximizing the total utility of allocations based on model constraints.

Findings

According to the results of fuzzy DANP method, technical and operational criterion was the most important followed by economic, political, managerial and environmental criteria. With respect to sub-criteria, international sanctions and political stability were the most important. The results of fuzzy WASPAS method indicated that gas injection was the first ranked alternative. Finally, the mathematical modeling allocated the recovery methods to five refineries of South Pars gas field in Iran based on budget and time constraints.

Originality/value

The proposed approach provides a systematic tool in the selection of flare recovery methods and allocation to refineries. This approach uses a new combination of fuzzy DEMATEL-ANP (DANP) method, fuzzy WASPAS method and mathematical programming. The approach is effectively implemented in a case study for ranking the flare gas recovery methods and allocating to refineries of South Pars gas field in Iran.

Article
Publication date: 7 March 2016

Nigel Cox, Amanda Clayson and Lucy Webb

The purpose of this paper is to develop further the understanding of co-productive methodological practice for substance use research by demonstrating the use of a mobile…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop further the understanding of co-productive methodological practice for substance use research by demonstrating the use of a mobile, multimedia interviewing aid by members of a UK recovery community.

Design/methodology/approach

A co-productive approach to data collection was piloted using a bespoke, audio-visual booth located in a range of recovery and community-focused social events. Audio-visual data were collaboratively selected, curated and analysed by recovery community partners and researchers.

Findings

Findings illustrate how a mobile audio-visual booth can be used successfully within co-productive research. This approach facilitated a better understanding of the experiences and practices of self-reflection within the recovery community as they worked together to create a meaningful recovery largely independent of conventional recovery services.

Research limitations/implications

This research was performed with one cohort of co-production members. However, the co-productive nature of the enquiry and the rich data this provided invites the making of cautious but firmer claims with regard to the transferability of this approach to similar recovery contexts.

Social implications

Co-productive approaches confer a meaningful impact upon members of the recovery community, and wider understanding of this approach will promote an impact upon others engaging in recovery, supporting growth of a practice-based and theoretically underpinned evidence base.

Originality/value

This study highlights use of digital technologies within co-productive community-based methodologies, reducing reliance upon academic expertise, and facilitating participant leadership in research. The analysis also signposts new areas for scholarly discussion in the area of co-productive, community-driven research.

Details

Drugs and Alcohol Today, vol. 16 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1745-9265

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 August 2016

Keith Ford

Recovery has been debated in mental health for some time. Attempts to clarify and make recovery operational have served to add confusion and uncertainty. This has failed…

Abstract

Purpose

Recovery has been debated in mental health for some time. Attempts to clarify and make recovery operational have served to add confusion and uncertainty. This has failed to unite service users and service providers due to differing approaches, despite the rhetoric. The purpose of this paper is to offer an overview and to position the context from a humanistic and salutogenic perspective appreciating new approaches and influences for people in their journey of recovery having been given a diagnosis of schizophrenia.

Design/methodology/approach

All literature available could not be included and therefore the author did not select papers purely demonstrating outcome statistics. The preference was to address papers looking at the connections people have and the important factors they feel contribute towards recovery.

Findings

An agreed definition of recovery cannot be established, but differing perspectives need to be appreciated and considered if recovery is to be successfully achieved. Some mental health practitioners may feel they have an understanding of recovery, yet evidence continues to point to the uncertainty in practice and delivery of services. Newer incentives and recovery networks are establishing themselves to meet areas missed by traditional approaches.

Originality/value

The value of this literature review is to highlight some of the areas already observed and to provoke the potential for fresh thinking in relation to a salutogenic approach taking into account the perceptions of the stakeholder groups. This would enable people to re-evaluate their thoughts and practice and contextualise where we are in relation to recovery for people diagnosed with schizophrenia.

Details

Mental Health and Social Inclusion, vol. 20 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-8308

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 May 2016

Rachel Perkins and Julie Repper

– The purpose of this paper is to propose a recovery-focused approach to risk and safety and what this might look like in practice.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to propose a recovery-focused approach to risk and safety and what this might look like in practice.

Design/methodology/approach

Review of recovery approaches and the ways in which traditional approaches to risk might hinder people in their recovery journey. Consideration of the principles of a recovery-focused approach to safety.

Findings

A recovery-focused approach to risk based on co-produced safety plans that enable people to do the things they value as safely as possible and shared responsibility for safety. Four key principles of a recovery-focused approach to promoting safety, autonomy and opportunity are proposed.

Originality/value

A recovery-focused approach to risk and safety is central to the development of recovery-focused practice within services. This paper outlines such an approach.

Details

Mental Health and Social Inclusion, vol. 20 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-8308

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 5 June 2017

Swee Siong Kuik, Sev Nagalingam, Premaratne Samaranayake and Michael William McLean

The purpose of this paper is to propose an approach to evaluate product performance of returned products, using four key performance attributes as the basis for improving…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to propose an approach to evaluate product performance of returned products, using four key performance attributes as the basis for improving sustainability through product recovery.

Design/methodology/approach

A fuzzy logic approach is developed to account a trade-off scenario for a manufactured product with recovery options. This approach is demonstrated using a numerical example and is validated using a case study in the automotive parts and components industry.

Findings

Product utilisation value (PUV) is found to be a useful index that manufacturers can use to assess product recovery options, as it brings together a number of conflicting parameters into a rationalised value for decision making. In addition, PUV provides a rationalised approach for comparing and selecting the most appropriate recovery configuration option.

Research limitations/implications

The authors only utilise four key performance measures to derive PUV. Further research is needed to modify and incorporate other measures that are important to decision makers to improve sustainability in manufacturing supply chains.

Practical implications

The proposed approach may motivate decision makers to consider sustainable recovery options by comparing PUVs of products for primary and secondary markets. The case study demonstrated the conflict and complexity organisations face in a global supply chain of a competitive industry.

Originality/value

The authors propose an approach to optimise trade-off considerations of selected performance attributes through PUV. This PUV as a benchmark can help improve recovery of the returned products and reduce landfill.

Details

Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, vol. 28 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-038X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 17 May 2013

Marcus Roberts and Andy Bell

The purpose of this paper is to examine the extent to which the two visions of recovery that are now being developed in the UK are consistent with each other and question…

2871

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the extent to which the two visions of recovery that are now being developed in the UK are consistent with each other and question what impact the development of parallel approaches will have on people at the intersections between them.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper looks first at the origins and current implementation of the two approaches and then examines the commonalities and differences in the context of what they might mean for people using both sets of services simultaneously.

Findings

The ideas behind Recovery in mental health and substance misuse services have some differences but significant common ground in focusing on improving quality of life.

Research limitations/implications

This paper points to the need to understand recovery in both services from the perspectives of those who have a dual diagnosis and need support from each service.

Practical implications

This paper could be used to develop new approaches to supporting people with a dual diagnosis with a consistent Recovery focus.

Originality/value

Placing personal recovery at the heart of both mental health and substance misuse services may, over time, improve their efficiency and effectiveness.

Details

Advances in Dual Diagnosis, vol. 6 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-0972

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 24 August 2022

Amir Khiabani, Alireza Rashidi Komijan, Vahidreza Ghezavati and Hadi Mohammadi Bidhandi

Airline scheduling is an extremely complex process. Moreover, disruption in a single flight may damage the entire schedule tremendously. Using an efficient recovery

Abstract

Purpose

Airline scheduling is an extremely complex process. Moreover, disruption in a single flight may damage the entire schedule tremendously. Using an efficient recovery scheduling strategy is vital for a commercial airline. The purpose of this paper is to present an integrated aircraft and crew recovery plans to reduce delay and prevent delay propagation on airline schedule with the minimum cost.

Design/methodology/approach

A mixed-integer linear programming model is proposed to formulate an integrated aircraft and crew recovery problem. The main contribution of the model is that recovery model is formulated based on individual flight legs instead of strings. This leads to a more accurate schedule and better solution. Also, some important issues such as crew swapping, reassignment of aircraft to other flights as well as ground and sit time requirements are considered in the model. Benders’ decomposition approach is used to solve the proposed model.

Findings

The model performance is also tested by a case including 227 flights, 64 crew, 56 aircraft and 40 different airports from American Airlines data for a 24-h horizon. The solution achieved the minimum cost value in 35 min. The results show that the model has a great performance to recover the entire schedule when disruption happens for random flights and propagation delay is successfully limited.

Originality/value

The authors confirm that this is an original paper and has not been published or under consideration in any other journal.

Details

Journal of Modelling in Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5664

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 35000