Search results

1 – 10 of over 104000
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 April 2004

Xiaomi An and Hongyan Jiao

ISO 15489 has provided best practice guidelines for records management which have many implications to the world. This paper, based on the results of a research project…

Abstract

ISO 15489 has provided best practice guidelines for records management which have many implications to the world. This paper, based on the results of a research project, provides a case study which shows that ISO 15489 can also be used for measuring records management performance as well. It can contribute to the identification of gaps between best practice, captured in the standard, and what is happening in reality in relation to records management policies, programmes, procedures and processes. It can then provide directions for further effective improvement. The author introduces records management in China and its features to provide the context and then measures records management in China against items of ISO 15489. Based on the weaknesses found, the author gives suggestions for the improvement of records management in China.

Details

Records Management Journal, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0956-5698

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 December 2003

Ceri Hughes

Since the launch of ISO‐15489 there have been more opportunities available to records managers to help them align themselves to the strategic direction of their…

Abstract

Since the launch of ISO‐15489 there have been more opportunities available to records managers to help them align themselves to the strategic direction of their organisation, raise their profile and increase awareness of their role. This is particularly true in the private sector, where key drivers are increased market share and competitive advantage. Skill sets originally developed for knowledge managers have resonance for records managers too to aid their personal development and as a tool for the strategic development of records management programmes. An example of this is the marketing of records management services, which is a critical opportunity to increase awareness and build profiles, and assist with records management education and adoption. By viewing the records management function as a business serving internal clients, the records manager has an unmissable chance to “sell” those services to clients.

Details

Records Management Journal, vol. 13 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0956-5698

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 March 1996

GRAHAM SOUTHWOOD

This article begins by charting some of the key phases in the development of records management practice in central government in the United Kingdom in the last two…

Abstract

This article begins by charting some of the key phases in the development of records management practice in central government in the United Kingdom in the last two decades. The parallel developments of closely related disciplines, such as information resource management, document management, archives administration and information and library management in a wider context, has resulted in fragmentation in the way information in organisations is managed. This in turn has reduced the impact of records management in particular not least, the author believes, because the term itself is not widely understood nor the practice of the discipline highly regarded. He proposes ways to change this concluding with the proposal to rename it ‘information logistics’.

Details

Records Management Journal, vol. 6 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0956-5698

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 30 March 2010

John McDonald

The purpose of this paper is to explore the information landscape of organizations by focusing on the evolution of the fields of so‐called records management and data management.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the information landscape of organizations by focusing on the evolution of the fields of so‐called records management and data management.

Design/methodology/approach

The author draws on his personal experience with the National Archives of Canada.

Findings

Records management and data management quite literally mean the same thing. There is no “gap”, as indicated in the title. The only gaps that exist are in the perceptions of what each concept means and the functions and status of the information jurisdictions that have claimed each for their own.

Originality/value

The paper recommends an integration of what has been perceived to be the disparate fields of records management and data management, finding that records or data should be managed from a global and corporately defined perspective

Details

Records Management Journal, vol. 20 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0956-5698

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 April 1999

Zawiyah M. Yusof and Robert W. Chell

This is the second part of a two‐part article which examines the various definitions accorded to the two key terms in records management – the records and records

Abstract

This is the second part of a two‐part article which examines the various definitions accorded to the two key terms in records management – the records and records management. Variations in their definition have lead to confusion which affects the formulation of theory to underpin the discipline. Having discussed the changing definition of a record in Part 1 in this part the authors discuss the various definitions of records management.

Details

Records Management Journal, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0956-5698

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 August 2005

Justus Wamukoya and Stephen M. Mutula

This article aims to examine capacity building requirements for e‐records management in East and Southern Africa. It argues that e‐records management poses a number of

Abstract

Purpose

This article aims to examine capacity building requirements for e‐records management in East and Southern Africa. It argues that e‐records management poses a number of problems and challenges that include but are not limited to: lack of skills and competencies, inadequate resources, lack of awareness among government authorities and records professionals, fragility of media and the need for specialized storage. The paper provides the current status of e‐records management in ESARBICA with emphasis on e‐records management capacity building. Last but not least, it proposes a number of strategies and solutions for the management of e‐records in ESARBICA.

Design/methodology/approach

This article is based on a literature review in general and desk research based on professional consultation and the experiences of the authors within the region.

Findings

Authors' findings indicate that there is a dearth of e‐records management skills and inadequate capacity in the ESARBICA member countries.

Research limitations/implications

The study was limited to ESARBICA member countries, whereas it would have been more inclusive if all the countries of East and Southern Africa were involved. More research is therefore needed to cover the rest of the region.

Practical implications

Effective e‐records management has the potential to improve service delivery and enhance accountability and transparency in government but only if requisite skills needs are met.

Originality/value

This is the first attempt to explore capacity‐building issues in East and Southern Africa in the area of e‐records management. However, it provides a generic model that can be replicated in similar research elsewhere.

Details

Records Management Journal, vol. 15 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0956-5698

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 August 2000

Marlize Palmer

Organisations and governments rarely see the connection between records management and the prevention of corruption, fraud and maladministration. This article gives an…

Abstract

Organisations and governments rarely see the connection between records management and the prevention of corruption, fraud and maladministration. This article gives an overview of what corruption and fraud entail and points out the importance of records management in ensuring accountability and providing a safeguard against corruption, fraud and maladministration. Good records management systems are essential to support financial management and financial accountability. Records management also ensures the public sector‘s ability to function effectively and provides documentary evidence to assist in ensuring accountable and transparent government.

Details

Records Management Journal, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0956-5698

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 January 1995

PETER HOUSTON

In 1989 the Public Record Office of Northern Ireland, suspecting that records in the departments of the Northern Ireland Civil Service could be more effectively managed…

Abstract

In 1989 the Public Record Office of Northern Ireland, suspecting that records in the departments of the Northern Ireland Civil Service could be more effectively managed, undertook a survey of records management. This was completed in early 1994 and the findings of the survey have confirmed the Record Office's suspicions. This article considers why this should be so and suggests possible action to remedy the situation. The author expresses his belief that this scenario will be familiar to many records managers and argues that the profession needs to be more proactive in stressing the value of information as a resource, and in selling the concepts of records management to senior executives. He concludes by arguing that recent developments in technology may provide an opportunity for records managers to enhance their profiles.

Details

Records Management Journal, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0956-5698

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 June 1996

Catherine E. Hare Julie McLeod and Lesley A. King

Explores the newly emerging information discipline of records management, focusing on its current status in the UK where it is represented by a range of sector‐specific…

Abstract

Explores the newly emerging information discipline of records management, focusing on its current status in the UK where it is represented by a range of sector‐specific and general for information professionals organizations. Investigates the issue of education and training in this developing field in the context of a research project on continuing vocational education for records practitioners, which is being undertaken by the Department of Information and Library Management at the University of Northumbria. Early results from the project identified two main training needs: one relates to a specific area of information management, that of managing electronic records, and the other relates to the general area of strategic approaches to management. While records management involves some skills and knowledge which are different from those already mastered by library and information professionals there are significant overlaps in terms of cataloguing, classification, indexing, identifying and meeting user needs and the challenge of dealing with information in electronic form. Contends, therefore, that in the changing and sometimes shrinking market of some of the more traditional library sectors records management may offer the opportunity to develop or shift one’s career path while remaining within the discipline of information management.

Details

Librarian Career Development, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-0810

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 April 1998

Henry N Kemoni

This study examines the role of records centres in relation to the management of public sector records in Kenya. It highlights the inadequacies of the Public Archives and…

Abstract

This study examines the role of records centres in relation to the management of public sector records in Kenya. It highlights the inadequacies of the Public Archives and Documentation Service Act (Cap 19) of 1965 as a tool to manage public sector records. The findings of the study are based on questionnaires which were distributed to provincial archivists in charge of records centres. One of the major findings of the study is that records centres have played a significant role in the management of public sector records. The study also addresses the various problems experienced by record creators in managing public sector records and notes that the resources availed to records centres are not commensurate with their growing responsibilities in records management. Among the recommendations are that the Public Archives Act should be revised, existing provincial records centres should be converted into provincial archives, staffing at both the professional and para‐professional levels should be improved and an attempt should be made to involve records creators in the management of records created within their organisations.

Details

Records Management Journal, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0956-5698

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 104000