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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2010

Roshani Palliyaguru, Dilanthi Amaratunga and Richard Haigh

The literature emphasises that integration of disaster risk reduction (DRR) into planning processes is a key to reduce natural disaster losses, boost socio‐economic…

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1011

Abstract

Purpose

The literature emphasises that integration of disaster risk reduction (DRR) into planning processes is a key to reduce natural disaster losses, boost socio‐economic development needs and ensure sustainability in development gains. But linking DRR to the infrastructure reconstruction sector has become a challenge in developing country settings. Therefore, the purpose of the main research, of which this paper is based on, is to explore how integration of DRR into infrastructure reconstruction should be done in such a way to contribute to socio‐economic development process. As a part of this main aim, this paper focuses on exploring the existing gap in the concept of DRR at the policy‐making level and the infrastructure reconstruction project level. Thus, the paper seeks to review the current policies on post‐disaster reconstruction and DRR at the national and intermediate‐organisational level in Sri Lanka and integration of DRR concept within these policies. Not limiting to the policies, DRR processes were assessed on their success through the level of implementation of DRR strategies at the post‐disaster infrastructure reconstruction projects.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is based on the data collated from a case study conducted in a water supply and sanitation reconstruction project in Sri Lanka supported by expert interviews among national and intermediate‐organisational level policy makers those who are involved in the development of policies related to disaster management and construction activities.

Findings

The results highlight the lack of individual policies on reconstruction and DRR of reconstruction at the national and intermediate‐organisational level except certain sections within certain policies. It was found that integration of DRR within these policies is lower than the level of importance of such integration. Further, the level of implementation of these policies in practise is average as it is averted by required speed and quality of reconstruction, availability of finances for reconstruction, the scale of reconstruction projects, reliability and practicability of policies, legitimacy of policies and adequacy of authority delegated to the relevant bodies, the consistency of various policies, detail explanations on relationships with other policies, the level of awareness about policies by the relevant bodies, attitude of construction professionals and experience of reconstruction bodies in the field of disaster reconstruction.

Research limitations/implications

The findings of this paper is not limited to one specific policy related to disaster management or construction in Sri Lanka. It represents an overall view of most of the existing policies in the field. Furthermore, the data collection was limited to the Sri Lanka context.

Practical implications

The findings of this paper will be useful to relevant policy makers to understand the areas needed further attention within the policies in terms of integration of DRR concept within them.

Originality/value

The paper is unique in its findings as it discovers overall gaps in the concept of DRR within the policies and actual infrastructure reconstruction project practises.

Details

International Journal of Disaster Resilience in the Built Environment, vol. 1 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-5908

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 22 June 2018

Tri Yumarni and Dilanthi Amaratunga

The purpose of this paper is to discuss policy-relevant findings regarding strategies for mainstreaming gender in achieving sustainable post-disaster reconstruction (PDR).

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1442

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to discuss policy-relevant findings regarding strategies for mainstreaming gender in achieving sustainable post-disaster reconstruction (PDR).

Design/methodology/approach

An exploratory case study was used to explore the implementation of gender mainstreaming strategies and the link to sustainable PDR. The Bantul and Sleman regencies of Yogyakarta province provide a unique site for researching PDR as they are located in a region that is more strongly affected by earthquakes than nearly any other in Indonesia. Data were collected through interviews with 17 key stakeholders and 26 beneficiaries who were involved during and after the earthquake. To support the interview findings, surveys involving 50 policy makers and 150 beneficiaries were conducted. Content analysis and t-statistics were used in analyzing the data.

Findings

Gender mainstreaming strategies within sustainable reconstruction should incorporate strategies for protecting against gender vulnerabilities and for promoting gender capacities. Both are fundamental to the achievement of sustainable PDR.

Originality/value

The paper establishes comprehensive strategies for mainstreaming gender under three pillars (i.e. economic, social and environmental) of sustainable development. The findings benefit relevant policy makers by improving the policy performance of gender mainstreaming in the affected communities in enhancing sustainable PDR.

Details

Built Environment Project and Asset Management, vol. 8 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-124X

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Article
Publication date: 12 July 2013

Taufika Ophiyandri, Dilanthi Amaratunga, Chaminda Pathirage and Kaushal Keraminiyage

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the critical success factors (CSFs) of community‐based post‐disaster housing reconstruction projects (CPHRP) during the…

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983

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the critical success factors (CSFs) of community‐based post‐disaster housing reconstruction projects (CPHRP) during the pre‐construction stage.

Design/methodology/approach

An extensive literature review and interviews were undertaken to establish selected factors contributing to the success of community‐based post disaster housing reconstruction projects. Following this, a questionnaire survey was administered to key stakeholders in order to perceive their view on CSFs of CPHRP. Data were analysed by deploying statistical software.

Findings

It was found that 12 factors are considered to be the CSFs: transparency and accountability, appropriate reconstruction policy/strategy, an understanding of the community‐based method, gathering trust from the community, facilitator capacity, good coordination and communication, sufficient funding availability, implementer capacity, having a significant level of community participation/control, government support, involvement of all community members, and successful beneficiary identification.

Practical implications

The establishment of CSFs in CPHRP helps key stakeholders to identify factors that must exist and go well during pre‐construction of CPHRP, in order to ensure the success of the programme.

Originality/value

The paper is very specific as it attempts to discover the CSFs of CPHRP during the pre‐construction stage.

Details

International Journal of Disaster Resilience in the Built Environment, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-5908

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Article
Publication date: 9 April 2018

Jorge Inzulza Contardo, Camillo Boano and Camila Wirsching

This study aims to explore the complex relationship between post-earthquake reconstruction processes and gentrification in neighbourhoods of intermediate cities, calling…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to explore the complex relationship between post-earthquake reconstruction processes and gentrification in neighbourhoods of intermediate cities, calling on the critical role of recovery strategies in altering neighbourhoods physical and social urban structure identities.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper uses a case study; the reconstruction process of the neighbourhoods post-2010 earthquake in Talca, Chile, and analyses in a six-year timeline its socio-spatial changes. The latter based on mixed methods, primary data from strategic interviews with key stakeholders, cadastres of land value and real estate housing projects and neighbourhood polls, and secondary data from official documents such as plans and policies.

Findings

The findings suggest that patterns of incipient gentrification are an outcome of the reconstruction strategies. Acknowledging the intricate interplay amongst urban neoliberal conditions, historical heritage and identities and post-disaster recovery, inadequate housing subsidies and normative plans are causing the displacement of hundreds of historical residents and resistance, arrival of newcomers with higher debt capacity in new housing typologies and increasing land value. Process related to neoliberal politics of state led to new-build gentrification.

Originality/value

Gentrification and reconstruction are both processes that modify urban structures, society and perceptions, and yet their socio spatial effects have never been studied in a cumulative and integrated manner, even more, in intermediate cities. The value is to rethink the critical role of recovery strategies in halting and containing gentrification in fast transforming secondary cities.

Details

International Journal of Disaster Resilience in the Built Environment, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-5908

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2021

Nyamagere Gladys Sospeter, Pantaleo D. Rwelamila and Joaquim J. Gimbi

This study develops a conceptual framework appropriate for managing Post-Disaster Reconstruction Projects (PDRPs) so as to avoid cost and time overruns in Angola.

Abstract

Purpose

This study develops a conceptual framework appropriate for managing Post-Disaster Reconstruction Projects (PDRPs) so as to avoid cost and time overruns in Angola.

Design/methodology/approach

An explanatory sequential mixed research approach was used. Data was collected from project participants within the ministry of planning, the provincial government office of planning and the local government in Angola. A questionnaire with closed questions was completed by 130 survey respondents. Semi-structured focus group interviews were conducted with seven participants selected through purposive sampling. Descriptive statistics, t-test and content analysis were used to analyse quantitative and qualitative data, respectively.

Findings

The study indicates that there is presently no formal project management process. Neither have government project management standards been developed and broadcast. This results in ad hoc processes being mostly used for managing PDRPs. The study further presents disaster preparation programme, community engagement, resources and stakeholder's engagement, post-disaster procurement policies, financial guides, post-disaster recovery legislation, context-specific (social economic, demographic, political and cultural variables), programme preparation as essential components to be considered for developing an appropriate framework for managing PDRPs.

Research limitations/implications

The study is limited by its geographical settings which focussed the results on one province in Angola. However, the findings can be useful for other countries wishing to gain insights on the framework with “overlooked components” for managing DPRPs in emerging countries with similar disaster environment, government policies and same business environment.

Practical implications

The framework for managing PDRPs may positively impact project realization, hence minimization of time and cost overruns. The findings are vital for managers, local practitioners and policy/decision-makers in emerging countries of essential components and lessons useful for managing PDRPs and making decisions when they intend to participate in such projects. An understanding of which approaches are critical and essential components of the framework serves as a basis for improving project delivery. Future research studies should describe its practical application.

Originality/value

The study provides insights by identifying an ordered grouped set of project management models/approaches mostly applicable for managing PDRPs in Angola, better understanding of appropriate components/variables to be considered and develops a conceptual framework for managing PDRPs in emerging countries, post-war context.

Details

Built Environment Project and Asset Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-124X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2019

Nura Ibold

The wave of popular unrest in the Arab world reached Syria in March 2011, and what started as peaceful demonstrations with simple demands of justice and freedom turned…

Abstract

The wave of popular unrest in the Arab world reached Syria in March 2011, and what started as peaceful demonstrations with simple demands of justice and freedom turned into a brutal armed conflict and a full-scale civil war. Over seven years of conflict resulted in the deaths of over half a million Syrians, the forced displacement of millions more, and a huge loss of the country's social and physical structures. What began as another Arab Spring movement against a dictatorial regime has turned into a proxy war that has attracted the interests of the world and regional powers. The paper discusses Syria's political history and investigates the motives for the Syrian uprising and argues that it is related to socio-economic deprivations rather than sectarianism. The work underlines the interests of the countries involved in the Syrian conflict focusing on Russia, USA, Iran, and Turkey, as well as their contribution to the future reconstruction of the country.

Over the past few years, the Syrian regime and its allies targeted many cities and destroyed opposition-held neighborhoods. The work considers if this destruction was part of an overall strategy adopted by the al-Assad regime to terrorize those who opposed it and change Syria demographically, examining the new laws issued by the government to transfer public properties into the hands of its loyal businessmen factions, as in the case of the reconstruction project in the city of Homs.

Seven years of war exhausted Syria's financial stocks, and the country (and in turn the regime) is suffering the consequences of military spending. But like any other war, destruction is also a great opportunity to generate money through reconstruction and growth. It is a “win-win situation”; the regime will use the fund designated for reviving the country to its own benefit, gaining future profits. Already invested in the conflict, involved countries will be part of the reconstruction process to secure their presence and control in Syria.

United Nations agencies like UNDP (United Nations Development Programme) and UNHCR (United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees) are working closely with the Syrian regime and its governmental representatives. This research examines their involvement and how their ‘humanitarian mission' is being exploited to prop up the al-Assad regime.

Details

Open House International, vol. 44 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0168-2601

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Article
Publication date: 13 June 2016

Mojgan Taheri Tafti and Richard Tomlinson

This paper aims to examine the socio-spatial transformation of earthquake-affected neighbourhoods as a setting for understanding post-disaster recovery trajectories of…

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169

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the socio-spatial transformation of earthquake-affected neighbourhoods as a setting for understanding post-disaster recovery trajectories of people, their opportunities for achieving housing recovery and their housing recovery outcomes.

Design/methodology/approach

Adopting a case study approach, this paper focuses on two neighbourhoods located in old urban areas of the city of Bhuj, India. The authors map the transformation of the built environment from before the earthquake, immediately after the earthquake and 10 years after the earthquake. While explaining the morphological changes of the built environment, the authors examine the associated changes in the social fabric of the neighbourhoods by explaining who stayed in their neighbourhoods, who moved out or moved in and who were displaced after the earthquake.

Findings

The authors explore the role of post-disaster public policies, including urban planning, in these changes and in shaping the opportunities of households and individuals for achieving recovery. These policies are compared and contrasted with other urban disaster responses to provide a better understanding of the possibilities of achieving more just recovery outcomes.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to the scant literature on post-disaster planning in cities of developing countries.

Details

International Journal of Disaster Resilience in the Built Environment, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-5908

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2006

Hens Runhaar, Carel Dieperink and Peter Driessen

The paper seeks to propose the basic competencies of environmental social scientists regarding policy analysis for sustainable development. The ultimate goal is to…

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5353

Abstract

Purpose

The paper seeks to propose the basic competencies of environmental social scientists regarding policy analysis for sustainable development. The ultimate goal is to contribute to an improvement of educational programmes in higher education by suggesting a toolbox that should be integrated in the curriculum.

Design/methodology/approach

Starting from the basic research questions regarding governance for sustainable development, five methods are identified capable of answering the following questions: reconstruction of policy theories; stakeholder analysis; impact assessment; cost‐benefit analysis; discourse analysis. Relevant information was collected through a literature review and practical experience by the authors.

Findings

These include: minimum content of the toolbox with methods of policy analysis for sustainable development; examples of how the toolbox can be applied; strengths and weaknesses of the methods; specification of competencies of environmental social scientists active in the area of policy analysis for sustainable development.

Practical implications

The paper proposes which methods of policy analysis for sustainable development should be integrated in higher education as well as how this should be done.

Originality/value

The paper systematically analyses the implications of the policy context in the domain of sustainable development for policy analysis in this area. In addition it gives a review of five basic methods: how they can be used to analyse policy issues from a sustainable development perspective. Aiming at reinforcing the input of scientific research in policy‐making, the paper eventually aims to promote sustainable development.

Details

International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-6370

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Article
Publication date: 27 May 2014

Sandeeka Mannakkara and Suzanne Wilkinson

– The purpose of this paper is to understand and define the concept of Building Back Better (BBB) and represent it using a comprehensive framework.

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1641

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to understand and define the concept of Building Back Better (BBB) and represent it using a comprehensive framework.

Design/methodology/approach

Literature related to the concept of BBB were studied to understand the key concepts which constitute BBB. These concepts were analysed and categorised to form the basis of the proposed BBB framework.

Findings

Post-disaster recovery in-line with BBB concepts can be achieved by having a holistic view of four key categories: risk reduction entails improving the resilience of the built environment through improvement of structural designs and land-use planning; community recovery includes addressing and supporting psycho-social recovery of communities and supporting economic rejuvenation; implementation addresses ways in which risk reduction and community recovery practices can be put in place in an efficient and effective way; monitoring and evaluation stretches across the first three categories, and calls for putting in place mechanisms to monitor and evaluate recovery activities to ensure compliance with BBB-based concepts and obtain lessons to improve future disaster management practices.

Research limitations/implications

The BBB Framework generated in this study can be used as a foundation to determine best-practice recommendations to implement recovery activities under each of the BBB categories.

Practical implications

The BBB Framework forms a guideline to holistically plan and implement recovery programmes in order to BBB.

Originality/value

A comprehensive guideline or framework which clarified what BBB really means is currently inexistent. This paper addressed this research gap by amalgamating existing information to create a singular framework to simply and comprehensively represent BBB.

Details

International Journal of Managing Projects in Business, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8378

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Article
Publication date: 12 July 2013

Ruhizal Roosli and Phil O'Keefe

Malaysia is still in the process of reorganising and restructuring disaster management policy, learning from national and international experiences. Argument about the…

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1195

Abstract

Purpose

Malaysia is still in the process of reorganising and restructuring disaster management policy, learning from national and international experiences. Argument about the current situation of emergency management and housing in Malaysia can be used by the decision makers, authorities and NGOs to develop strategies and actions that include awareness raising and capacity building for enhancing enforcement of current legislation.

Design/methodology/approach

The work concentrated mostly on academic reports of original investigations rather than reviews. The conclusions in this paper are generalizations based on the authors' interpretation of those original reports.

Findings

Malaysia is not a developed country and also not a developing country but is more in the middle, and follows any direction from the international arena to national situation. Malaysia has a developed country approach in disaster management policy but with the implementation capacity of a developing country. This paper argues that providing post‐disaster housing must accommodate requirements in the national disaster management policy and parallel with the needs from international concern to the rights of disaster victims.

Originality/value

The outcomes from this discussion might give insights into designing and planning the national policy and disaster management framework by restructuring and reorganising the present National Disaster Management Mechanism in terms of enhancing the coordination of responsibility between and within government bodies in the National Disaster Management Mechanism.

Details

International Journal of Disaster Resilience in the Built Environment, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-5908

Keywords

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