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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1992

Linda J. McKie and Roy C. Wood

Presents an analysis of data collected by questionnaire from 50respondents on their sources of recipes. The questionnaires werecompleted by men and women who were members…

Abstract

Presents an analysis of data collected by questionnaire from 50 respondents on their sources of recipes. The questionnaires were completed by men and women who were members of various groups and communities located in the Edinburgh area. The data are analysed in respect of gender, class, age variations and variations according to family size. Concludes that the recipe possesses a social significance that merits greater attention, for it is the starting point of many culinary and related activities. The implications of such findings for the food industry are manifold. Many respondents identified the purchase and receipt of cookery books, the collection of recipes, and the exchange of recipes as related activities. As such, the cultural significance of the recipe and its importance in food marketing cannot be underestimated.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 94 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 6 November 2020

Tressie Barrett and Yaohua Feng

Numerous food recalls and outbreaks were associated with wheat flour in recent years. Few consumers are cognizant of food safety risks associated with raw flour. The…

Abstract

Purpose

Numerous food recalls and outbreaks were associated with wheat flour in recent years. Few consumers are cognizant of food safety risks associated with raw flour. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the food safety information and flour-handling behaviors presented in popular food blog recipes and in YouTube videos using cookie, cookie dough and egg noodle recipes as examples.

Design/methodology/approach

Eighty-five blog recipes and 146 videos were evaluated. Blog author and video host food-handling experience was classified as professional or nonprofessional. Food safety information and food-handling behaviors were evaluated for adherence to government and scientific recommendations.

Findings

Blog authors and video hosts demonstrated higher awareness of food safety risks associated with raw eggs compared to raw flour, which only translated into better adherence with recommended food-handling behaviors during ingredient addition steps. Cross-contamination from adding raw flour to the product was observed in 25% of videos, whereas cross-contamination from hosts adding raw shell eggs was observed 3% of videos. Blog authors and video hosts did not recommend or demonstrate handwashing after handling raw shell eggs nor raw flour, and fewer than 5% provided recommendations for cleaning work surfaces. Heat treatment methods to convert raw flour into ready-to-eat products were mentioned by 24% of blog authors and 18% of video hosts; however, the recommendations were not scientifically validated.

Originality/value

This study demonstrates the need to develop educational interventions that increase blog authors' and video hosts' awareness of risks associated with raw flour and that translate this knowledge into practiced behaviors.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 123 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 July 2016

Sari Yli-Kauhaluoma and Mika Pantzar

– The purpose of this paper is to examine how back-office service staff cope with the intricacies of administrative work.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine how back-office service staff cope with the intricacies of administrative work.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper applies the research approach of “at-home ethnography” in a university back-office. The primary method of data collection was participant listening in the field, either in formal interviews or casual conversations. Photography helped the authors to zoom the conversation in to specific artefacts in administrative offices.

Findings

The study identifies both forward- and backward-looking recipes as essential administrative tools that back-office staff develop and use to handle intricacies that emerge in their daily work. Forward-looking recipes are based on anticipatory cognitive representations, whereas backward-looking recipes are based on experiential wisdom. The study elaborates on the different kinds of modelling practices that back-office service staff engage in while building and applying these two different kinds of recipes.

Practical implications

The recipes support administrators in knowledge replication and thus help avoid interruptions, reduce uncertainty, and produce consistency in administrative processes.

Originality/value

In contrast to existing studies of formal bureaucracies, the study provides a unique empirical account to show how back-office service staff cope with the multiple intricacies existing in current office environments. The study shows how recipes as models contribute to stabilizing or even routinizing work processes in complex administrative situations.

Details

Journal of Organizational Ethnography, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-6749

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 19 October 2010

Jenna Hartel

This paper aims to describe the way participants in the hobby of gourmet cooking in the USA manage culinary information in their homes.

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to describe the way participants in the hobby of gourmet cooking in the USA manage culinary information in their homes.

Design/methodology/approach

The study utilizes domain analysis and serious leisure as a conceptual framework and employs an ethnographic approach. In total 20 gourmet cooks in the USA were interviewed at home and then their culinary information collections were documented through a guided tour and photographic inventory. The resulting ethnographic record was analyzed using grounded theory and NVivo software.

Findings

The findings introduce the personal culinary library (PCL): a constellation of cooking‐related information resources and information structures in the home of the gourmet cook, and an associated set of upkeep activities that increase with the collection's size. PCLs are shown to vary in content, scale, distribution in space, and their role in the hobby. The personal libraries are characterized as small, medium or large and case studies of each extreme are presented. Larger PCLs are cast as a bibliographic pyramid distributed throughout the home in the form of a mother lode, zone, recipe collection, and binder.

Practical implications

Insights are provided into three areas: scientific ethnography as a methodology; a theory of documents in the hobby; and the changing role of information professionals given the increasing prevalence of home‐based information collections.

Originality/value

This project provides an original conceptual framework and research method for the study of information in personal spaces such as the home, and describes information phenomena in a popular, serious leisure, hobby setting.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 66 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 24 August 2018

Yandisa Ngqangashe, Charlotte de Backer, Christophe Matthys and Nina Hermans

The purpose of this paper is to analyse the nutritional content of recipes prepared in popular children’s television (TV) cooking shows.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyse the nutritional content of recipes prepared in popular children’s television (TV) cooking shows.

Design/methodology/approach

A cross-sectional analysis of 150 recipes focusing on calorie, total fat and carbohydrates, saturated fatty acids, fibre, sugar, protein and salt content was performed. Main course recipes were evaluated against the UK Food Standards Agency (FSA), and the proportions of energy derived from each nutrient were evaluated against the World Health Organization (WHO) recommendations.

Findings

While a significant proportion met the FSA and WHO recommendations for energy and salt, 58 per cent were above the FSA recommendation for total fat (χ2=5.598, p=0.01), 56 per cent failed to meet the recommendations for saturated fatty acids (χ2=4.551, p=0.03) and 60 per cent exceeded the FSA protein recommendations (χ2=12.602, p<0.001). Only 17 and 21 per cent of the recipes met the minimum recommendations for carbohydrates (χ2=30.429, p<0.001) and fibre (χ2=16.909, p<0.001), respectively. Only 37 per cent had adequate portion of fruits and vegetables. The nutritional content varied depending on the composition of the recipes; vegetarian recipes were more likely to meet the recommendations than poultry, meat or fish recipes.

Research limitations/implications

Foods displayed by children’s popular TV cooking show fall short of the standards for healthy eating, thus warranting further research on how these shows affect eating behaviour.

Originality/value

This study is the first to consider children’s TV cooking shows as a platform of exposure to unhealthy foods.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 120 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 4 February 2021

Katerina Giazitzi and George Boskou

The purpose of the present study was to develop a methodology for the creation of nutritionally balanced (NB) recipes and meals.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the present study was to develop a methodology for the creation of nutritionally balanced (NB) recipes and meals.

Design/methodology/approach

Nutritional criteria were set for energy, fats, saturated fats, carbohydrates, sugars and salt. A sample of 50 main courses and 29 salads was evaluated and nutritionally reformulated to meet the criteria. One sample t-test, paired sample t-test, Pearson correlation coefficient and linear regression analysis were performed.

Findings

The original main courses and salads did not meet the nutritional criteria for fats and energy. Both original and NB main courses had high mean protein content. The reformulation of recipes caused a significant change on the provided energy (−50.2%), fats (−57.6%), saturated fats (−58.8%), carbohydrates (−24.2%), proteins (−35.6%) and salt (−53.8%) for the salads (p = 0.001). Accordingly, reformulation of recipes caused a significant change on provided energy (−38.4%), fats (−55.2%), saturated fats (−58.3%), proteins (−25.9%) and salt (−50%) for the main courses (p < 0.001). Predictive models (linear regression analysis) for fats (R2 = 0.345), proteins (R2 = 0.876) and carbohydrates (R2 = 0.797) on the NB recipes were performed.

Originality/value

This is the first attempt to improve the nutritional value of cooking recipes, based on specific nutritional criteria. A methodological procedure for the creation of NB meals is proposed. This methodology could be a useful tool for the nutritionists and chefs, which, in a context of cooperation, could create databases and cooking books with NB recipes easily accessed to public and caterers. The recipes that constitute NB meals could guarantee the standardization of the recipes' reformulation, within a certification standard for restaurants.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 123 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 2 May 2017

Katrina Levine, Ashley Chaifetz and Benjamin Chapman

Medeiros et al. (2001) estimate 3.5 million cases of foodborne illness in the USA annually are associated with inadequate cooking of animal foods or cross-contamination…

Abstract

Purpose

Medeiros et al. (2001) estimate 3.5 million cases of foodborne illness in the USA annually are associated with inadequate cooking of animal foods or cross-contamination from these foods. Past research shows home food handling practices can be risk factors for foodborne illness. The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the communication of food safety guidance, specifically safe endpoint temperatures and cross-contamination risk reduction practices, in popular cookbook recipes.

Design/methodology/approach

Recipes containing raw animal ingredients in 29 popular cookbooks were evaluated through content analysis for messages related to safe endpoint temperature recommendations and reducing cross-contamination risks.

Findings

Of 1,749 recipes meeting study criteria of cooking raw animal ingredients, 1,497 contained a raw animal that could effectively be measured with a digital thermometer. Only 123 (8.2 percent) of these recipes included an endpoint temperature, of which 89 (72.3 percent) gave a correct temperature. Neutral and positive food safety behavior messages were provided in just 7.2 percent (n=126) and 5.1 percent (n=90) of recipes, respectively. When endpoint temperatures were not included, authors often provided subjective and risky recommendations.

Research limitations/implications

Further research is needed on the effect of these results on consumer behavior and to develop interventions for writing recipes with better food safety guidance.

Practical implications

Including correct food safety guidance in cookbooks may increase the potential of reducing the risk of foodborne illness.

Originality/value

Popular cookbooks are an underutilized avenue for communicating safe food handling practices and currently cookbook authors are risk amplifiers.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 119 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 4 December 2012

Carl Gustav Johannsen and Niels Ole Pors

Purpose — This article is inspired by sociology and institutional theory. It investigates how and why the adoption of Evidence-Based Library and Information Practice…

Abstract

Purpose — This article is inspired by sociology and institutional theory. It investigates how and why the adoption of Evidence-Based Library and Information Practice (EBLIP) by public and academic libraries in Europe reveals a remarkable variety and complexity. Primarily, it is observed differences in adoption and use of EBLIP — principles in different European countries that are in focus of the article.

Design/methodology/approach — The purpose of this article is to take a closer look upon these differences. The theoretical framework applied is inspired by a sociological approach, especially the notions developed within the framework of Scandinavian institutional theory. This approach invites to deal with the topic in a nuanced way by delivering fruitful concepts such as drivers for adopting new ideas, the importance of identity and organisational fields, concept migration, adoption processes and travel routes of ideas including the importance of imitation and translation of concepts. Furthermore, in this article, we will also consider the significance of topics such as organisational and information culture and leadership of adoption processes. The methodology can be classified as desktop research and some of the findings are based on a government-supported study in Denmark.

Findings — What was found in the course of the work? This will refer to analysis, discussion or results. The findings relate to the purposes and they are formulated in relation to six research questions. Findings are that several factors influence the adoption and use of EBLIP. The factors are among others national culture, cultural traits embedded in the value system of different types of library work and also related to information culture. The concept of organisational recipes appears to be a rather strong concept in relation to, for example, which forms of EBLIP a library adopt.

Research limitations/implications (if applicable) — The research clearly demonstrates that the diversified theoretical approach taken in this article would be fruitful as a starting point for further research.

Practical implications (if applicable) — A practical implication is that the library and information sector could benefit from the establishment of institutions that produce systematic reviews and also that the sector ought to be aware of the different forms of evidence-based practices classified as either soft or hard.

Originality/value — The article is one of the few in the field that introduces several new theoretical approaches together with an emphasis on cultures at different forms and levels.

Details

Library and Information Science Trends and Research: Europe
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-714-7

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 2002

Mabel Blades

Provides some suggestions for consideration by anyone involved in the nutritional calculation of recipes. Topics such as weights of ingredients, conversions of weights…

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Abstract

Provides some suggestions for consideration by anyone involved in the nutritional calculation of recipes. Topics such as weights of ingredients, conversions of weights from imperial to metric, use of raw or cooked ingredients and specific cooking methods are all discussed.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 32 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 September 2009

Sudi Sharifi and Michael Zhang

The purpose of this paper is to examine the processes of knowing and sense‐making in small client‐based firms.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the processes of knowing and sense‐making in small client‐based firms.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper adopts a qualitative approach to the case studies of two small firms in the public relations sector located in the North West of England. The paper also assumes that the firms are “activity systems” and thus draws on the “activity theory” as a framework for conducting the empirical study.

Findings

The data and analysis highlight the firms' ability to survive, grow and innovate, drawing on knowing and sense‐making recipes shaped mainly by the extent and nature of the managers' networks and “significant others” including policy makers, customers, suppliers and competitors.

Research limitations/implications

The paper is based on two case studies. Although in‐depth analysis is achieved through narratives of rich data, it cannot be generalised across firms. Increasing the number of cases will certainly add validity for pattern recognition and this is the future direction of research.

Practical implications

Managerial knowledge and experience gained from past events and incidents are important inputs of decision making. The paper argues that managers naturally draw on their “intuition” in their enactment of events. Such intuitions and judgments are complemented by intended courses of action. It is reflection on such incidences that realises the experiences. Reflective and reflexive attempts provide valuable learning moments for managers and organisations.

Originality/value

The paper notes that there is a limited account and understanding of the processes of knowing and sense‐making in SMEs. It therefore offers a framework for illustrating the dynamic interactions between managers' enacting, knowing and the development of sense‐making recipes. It is an attempt to contribute to the understanding of “knowing” in SMEs.

Details

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. 15 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

Keywords

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