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Article
Publication date: 30 May 2018

Anna L. Neatrour, Elizabeth Callaway and Rebekah Cummings

This paper aims to determine if the digital humanities technique of topic modeling would reveal interesting patterns in a corpus of library-themed literature focused on…

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to determine if the digital humanities technique of topic modeling would reveal interesting patterns in a corpus of library-themed literature focused on the future of libraries and pioneer a collaboration model in librarian-led digital humanities projects. By developing the project, librarians learned how to better support digital humanities by actually doing digital humanities, as well as gaining insight on the variety of approaches taken by researchers and commenters to the idea of the future of libraries.

Design/methodology/approach

The researchers collected a corpus of over 150 texts (articles, blog posts, book chapters, websites, etc.) that all addressed the future of the library. They ran several instances of latent Dirichlet allocation style topic modeling on the corpus using the programming language R. Once they produced a run in which the topics were cohesive and discrete, they produced word-clouds of the words associated with each topic, visualized topics through time and examined in detail the top five documents associated with each topic.

Findings

The research project provided an effective way for librarians to gain practical experience in digital humanities and develop a greater understanding of collaborative workflows in digital humanities. By examining a corpus of library-themed literature, the researchers gained new insight into how the profession grapples with the idea of the future and an appreciation for topic modeling as a form of literature review.

Originality/value

Topic modeling a future-themed corpus of library literature is a unique research project and provides a way to support collaboration between library faculty and researchers from outside the library.

Details

Digital Library Perspectives, vol. 34 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-5816

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 5 June 2017

Adetoun A. Oyelude

Virtual reality (VR) and augmented reality (AR) are technologies gaining more ground, and their uses in libraries and for educational purposes are expanding.

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2784

Abstract

Purpose

Virtual reality (VR) and augmented reality (AR) are technologies gaining more ground, and their uses in libraries and for educational purposes are expanding.

Design/methodology/approach

Ethical and legal issues in the use of VR and AR are bound to arise in future if the technology is used for less-than-laudable functions.

Findings

For now, the Western world uses both technologies more, even though it is free and, in some cases, less expensive than before now.

Originality/value

It superimposes a computer-generated image on a user’s view of the real world, providing a composite view. Both technologies aim to make the user feel a sense of being there and experiencing what is being viewed in real time.

Details

Library Hi Tech News, vol. 34 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0741-9058

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 8 July 2015

Richard L. Moreland

I present and evaluate various explanations for why new workers who were sponsored by oldtimers tend to have better job outcomes (better performance, more satisfaction…

Abstract

Purpose

I present and evaluate various explanations for why new workers who were sponsored by oldtimers tend to have better job outcomes (better performance, more satisfaction, and less turnover) than do new workers who were not sponsored.

Methodology/approach

My evaluations involve searching for evidence that fits (or does not fit) each of the explanations.

Findings

The two most popular explanations argue that the job benefits of sponsorship arise because (a) sponsored newcomers have more realistic job expectations than do unsponsored newcomers, or (b) the quality of sponsored newcomers is greater than that of unsponsored newcomers. Unfortunately, these explanations have weak empirical support. A third explanation, largely untested as yet, attributes the performance benefits of sponsorship to social pressures that can arise when someone is sponsored for a job. These pressures include efforts by newcomers to repay the people who sponsored them, efforts by sponsors to assist the newcomers they sponsored after those persons have been hired, and stereotypes among coworkers about the kinds of people who get jobs through sponsors. Although limited as yet, the evidence regarding this new explanation seems promising.

Research implications

More research on this third explanation for sponsorship effects should be done. Suggestions for how to do such research are reviewed and a relevant experiment is presented.

Social implications

The ideas and evidence presented here could help employers who want to improve the job outcomes of their new workers. Poor outcomes among such persons are a major problem in many settings.

Originality/value

Although some of my ideas have been mentioned by others, they were not been described in much detail, nor were they tested. My hope is that this chapter will promote new theory and research on the performance benefits of sponsorship, a topic that has been largely ignored in recent years.

Details

Advances in Group Processes
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-076-0

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 16 October 2017

Philip T. Roundy

Social entrepreneurship represents an unconventional, but increasingly prevalent, activity in developed and emerging economies. Social entrepreneurs devise novel business…

Abstract

Purpose

Social entrepreneurship represents an unconventional, but increasingly prevalent, activity in developed and emerging economies. Social entrepreneurs devise novel business models that blend business and social missions with the aim of (co-)producing value with two primary stakeholder groups, beneficiaries and customers. Although interactions between social entrepreneurs and their beneficiaries are well-studied, the relationship between social ventures and consumers has received almost no extended attention.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a qualitative, partially-inductive approach based on interviews with 40 social entrepreneurs, a study of how social entrepreneurs market their ventures to consumers was conducted.

Findings

Findings reveal the ways in which marketing is relevant for social entrepreneurs, the unique challenges and opportunities entrepreneurs face in their interactions with customers, and the tactics entrepreneurs use to understand and educate their consumers.

Originality/value

The study’s findings contribute to work on social entrepreneurship and the entrepreneurship and marketing interface and have practical implications for social entrepreneurs.

Details

Journal of Research in Marketing and Entrepreneurship, vol. 19 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-5201

Keywords

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