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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2006

Rebecca Sanford and Johanna E. Foster

Development of prison postsecondary education and training programs since the elimination of Pell Grants to inmates has been constructed through smaller‐scale educators…

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1455

Abstract

Purpose

Development of prison postsecondary education and training programs since the elimination of Pell Grants to inmates has been constructed through smaller‐scale educators and institutions working toward more democratic access to higher education. The authors of this article work as educators and program developers in two such programs in women's correctional facilities and use these programs as exemplars to describe the necessary components and potential pitfalls in developing and implementing college‐in‐prison and vocational‐training‐in‐prison. The purpose of this paper is to describe the experiences and challenges faced by the authors, first as educators and then as program developers, as they attempted to expand the impact of educational opportunity across a larger segment of the US incarcerated population in the prisons where they teach.

Design/methodology/approach

This article steps away from day‐to‐day classroom descriptions and focuses on the larger picture of the conditions necessary to succeed in implementation of novel and socially vital programs to currently incarcerated women in the USA.

Findings

The benefits of working toward democratizing access to postsecondary education for incarcerated students cannot be overstated for those of interested in protecting fundamental human rights. Policy changes, alliances with Departments of Corrections and matriculating institutions, and educators willing to work toward building their own postsecondary programs are vital components of what must become a more central piece of continued educational justice movements in the USA and elsewhere.

Originality/value

The paper offers suggestions for program execution and critically examines obstacles that need to be managed during planning and achievement of program goals.

Details

Equal Opportunities International, vol. 25 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0261-0159

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2006

Johanna E. Foster and Rebecca Sanford

The purpose of this paper is to apply a feminist perspective to the crisis in prison higher education in the US by exploring whether gender shapes access to on‐site…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to apply a feminist perspective to the crisis in prison higher education in the US by exploring whether gender shapes access to on‐site, non‐occupational college programs in state prisons differently for women than for men.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper utilized a content analysis of official US state departments of correction websites and an email survey of state directors of education.

Findings

Findings show that while both women and men had little access to on‐site, non‐occupational college programming in the 2005‐2006 academic year, women in state prison had slightly greater access than men.

Research limitations/implications

Theoretical implications of the findings include the importance of focusing a gender lens on correctional education programming, as well as the importance of extending analysis beyond gender alone towards an analysis of the intersections of gender, race, and class inequalities on access to prison higher education.

Practical implications

Practical implications include the identification of an emergent educational justice movement in the USA, and the presentation of exploratory data on the current college‐in‐prison programs useful for progressive activists, policymakers, correctional education administrators, equity scholars, and others interested in organizing around democratic access to postsecondary correctional education.

Originality/value

As there is little current research on college‐in‐prison programs in the US, and less on the gendered dimensions of program access, the paper makes an original valuable contribution to several literatures.

Details

Equal Opportunities International, vol. 25 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0261-0159

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 October 2006

Mary Gatta

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720

Abstract

Details

Equal Opportunities International, vol. 25 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0261-0159

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2001

Andrea M. Bodtker and Jessica Katz Jameson

A growing body of research suggests that conflict can be beneficial for groups and organizations (e.g., De Dren & Van De Vliert, 1997). This paper articulates the argument…

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3679

Abstract

A growing body of research suggests that conflict can be beneficial for groups and organizations (e.g., De Dren & Van De Vliert, 1997). This paper articulates the argument that to be in conflict is to be emotionally activated (Jones, 2000) and utilizes Galtung's (1996) triadic theory of conflict transformation to locate entry points for conflict generation. Application of these ideas is presented through exemplars that demonstrate the utility of addressing emotions directly in the management of organizational conflicts.

Details

International Journal of Conflict Management, vol. 12 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1044-4068

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Article
Publication date: 24 April 2020

Jiyoung Kim, Rebecca Melton, Jihye Ellie Min and Bu Yong Kim

The purpose of this research is to conduct an exploratory study to discover if presenting consumers with a certain content type (i.e. product-focused content with…

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1008

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this research is to conduct an exploratory study to discover if presenting consumers with a certain content type (i.e. product-focused content with informational appeal, institution-focused content with emotional appeal, experience-focused content with emotional appeal,) and blog type (i.e. a corporate, sponsored or a personal blog) persuade consumers to form perceptions of credibility and similarity toward the fashion brand, which leads them to further engage with the brand through Electronic Word of Mouth (eWOM).

Design/methodology/approach

This study employs a 3(content type: product-focused, institution-focused, experience-focused) x 3(blog type: corporate, sponsored and personal) between-subjects design. Mock fashion blogs and content were developed in order to provide a realistic blogging experience for the participants. With 511 usable data collected, ANOVA was employed to test the relationships.

Findings

Findings reveal that content type, specifically product-focused content and experiential content, is an important consideration for illustrating similarities between the brand and consumers compared to institutional content. Product-focused content is found to be effective in encouraging consumer eWOM for the brand as well. Further, the interaction effect of blog type and content type was significant in establishing brand credibility. However, blog type did not influence any of the dependent variable.

Originality/value

This study brings meaningful suggestions to fashion brands on effective blog campaign, which eventually provide insights on how brands can influence female consumers to shape positive evaluation toward the brand.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal, vol. 24 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 October 1998

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99

Abstract

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 70 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 18 November 2019

Katherine C. Cotter and Rebecca J. Reichard

The ability to effectively engage in cross-cultural interactions is imperative for leaders in our increasingly globalized world. Those who possess certain key…

Abstract

The ability to effectively engage in cross-cultural interactions is imperative for leaders in our increasingly globalized world. Those who possess certain key psychological resources are more likely to engage in cross-cultural interactions successfully. Psychological resources include cross-cultural hope, efficacy, resilience, and optimism, which together comprise cross-cultural psychological capital (CC PsyCap). Previous research has indicated that CC PsyCap predicts cultural competence, yet the pathways underlying this relationship remain unexplored. We examined the relationships among CC PsyCap, engagement in cross-cultural interactions, stress during cross-cultural interactions, and cultural competence. The hypothesized relationships were tested using a sample of 135 undergraduate students (76% female) participating in study abroad programs. Participants completed measures of cultural competence, CC PsyCap, engagement, and stress approximately one month into their study abroad. Structural equation modeling analyses indicate that CC PsyCap and stress influence cultural competence directly and indirectly through engagement level during cross-cultural interactions. Furthermore, the results suggest that CC PsyCap indirectly influences engagement through stress during cross-cultural interactions. We discuss the implications of these results for people preparing to enter cross-cultural environments.

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1995

Jeanie M. Welch

One of the newest crimes to be put on the books is stalking, usually defined as repeatedly being in the presence of another person with the intent to cause emotional…

Abstract

One of the newest crimes to be put on the books is stalking, usually defined as repeatedly being in the presence of another person with the intent to cause emotional distress or bodily harm after being warned or requested not to do so. Stalking must be done over a period of time to indicate a pattern or continuity of purpose. Threats against a person or person's family may be stated or implied in stalking. Stalking victims are followed and harassed at work, at school, and at home. Stalking can also be done electronically, either using computers to send harassing e‐mail messages or by jamming telefacsimile machines with unwanted transmissions. There have been numerous high‐profile stalking cases that gained a great deal of publicity and focused attention on stalking. “Celebrity stalking” cases came to the public's attention in 1982 when actress Theresa Saldana was stabbed by a stalker. In 1989 actress Rebecca Schaeffer was shot and killed by a man who had stalked her for two years. In the 1990s the assault on skater Nancy Kerrigan, television talk shows and movies, and nonfiction works on stalking, including cases that ended with the death of the stalking victim, have focused public attention on this issue.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 23 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 2005

Susie Pryor and Sanford Grossbart

This article seeks to demonstrate how sociological perspectives and ethnographic methods provide insights into extraeconomic and suprafirm factors that may contribute to…

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1793

Abstract

Purpose

This article seeks to demonstrate how sociological perspectives and ethnographic methods provide insights into extraeconomic and suprafirm factors that may contribute to the functioning and character of downtown business districts. The study is intended to suggest directions for future research, rather than provide a definitive test of specific propositions.

Design/methodology/approach

A long‐term field investigation of a Midwestern American Main Street is presented in an extended case study format. Participant observation, depth and field interviews, and secondary data collection are the primary methods employed.

Findings

The findings suggest three dialectics that reflect extraeconomic dimensions underlying vital Main Streets. These include continua regarding the structure, function, and festive nature of marketplace activities. In this study, relatively few marketplace activities were commercial functions. Moreover, most were co‐produced by consumers and marketers. The extent of co‐production may contribute to the functioning and character of this vibrant downtown business district.

Research limitations/implications

This study was designed foster future research regarding the downtown business district as an historical sociocommercial entity. However, it does not test specific hypotheses.

Practical implications

This article should interest retailers, rural economists, city planners, and economic development agencies due to its focus on sociocommercial aspects of small city commercial centers.

Originality/value

The article highlights the extraeconomic importance of downtown business districts. It presents a case study of a successful Main Street, in contrast with studies that focus on the geographic, economic, and competitive factors related to failed or failing Main Streets.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 33 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 21 September 2015

Abstract

Details

Education, Social Factors, and Health Beliefs in Health and Health Care Services
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-367-9

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