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1 – 10 of 173
Open Access
Article
Publication date: 16 April 2024

Rebecca Rogers, Martille Elias, LaTisha Smith and Melinda Scheetz

This paper shares findings from a multi-year literacy professional development partnership between a school district and university (2014–2019). We share this case of a Literacy…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper shares findings from a multi-year literacy professional development partnership between a school district and university (2014–2019). We share this case of a Literacy Cohort initiative as an example of cross-institutional professional development situated within several of NAPDS’ nine essentials, including professional learning and leading, boundary-spanning roles and reflection and innovation (NAPDS, 2021).

Design/methodology/approach

We asked, “In what ways did the Cohort initiative create conditions for community and collaboration in the service of meaningful literacy reforms?” Drawing on social design methodology (Gutiérrez & Vossoughi, 2010), we sought to generate and examine the educational change associated with this multi-year initiative. Our data set included programmatic data, interviews (N = 30) and artifacts of literacy teaching, learning and leading.

Findings

Our findings reflect the emphasis areas that are important to educators in the partnership: diversity by design, building relationships through collaboration and rooting literacy reforms in teacher leadership. Our discussion explores threads of reciprocity, simultaneous renewal and boundary-spanning leadership and their role in sustaining partnerships over time.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to our understanding of building and sustaining a cohort model of multi-year professional development through the voices, perspectives and experiences of teachers, faculty and district administrators.

Details

School-University Partnerships, vol. 17 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1935-7125

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 29 July 2019

Rebecca Rogers

This paper aims to share findings from an interview study with literacy educators who are working together to imagine and build a transformative, humanizing and expansive…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to share findings from an interview study with literacy educators who are working together to imagine and build a transformative, humanizing and expansive education.

Design/methodology/approach

Appreciative inquiry is a design and process that seeks ways to discover the potential of educators while also affirming what exists and using these insights to strengthen collective efforts (Cooperrider and Srivastva, 1987).

Findings

The educators’ narratives of solidarity provide us a window to see the collaborative transformative practices that create networks for educational justice. A model of expansive learning and solidarity is introduced.

Research limitations/implications

While the focus in this paper has been on one social justice network, the author’s intention has been to describe and interpret the broader processes of expansive learning, collaborative transformative practices and narratives of solidarity.

Practical implications

This study offers a unique, contextualized perspective of educators working together to create social justice literacies and the kinds of learning communities that are necessary to do so.

Social implications

Identifying the conditions necessary to build and sustain a network of social justice educators can promote the expansion of such networks.

Originality/value

Few studies have focused on literacy educators' narratives of solidarity and the thematic contours of solidarity in educational contexts. Further, this paper links the concepts of agency and solidarity.

Details

English Teaching: Practice & Critique, vol. 18 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1175-8708

Keywords

Content available

Abstract

Details

History of Education Review, vol. 47 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0819-8691

Keywords

Open Access
Book part
Publication date: 1 December 2022

Agnès Vandevelde-Rougale and Patricia Guerrero Morales

This chapter looks at the discursive dimension of the working environment in research and higher education organizations; more specifically at neoliberal managerial discourse and…

Abstract

This chapter looks at the discursive dimension of the working environment in research and higher education organizations; more specifically at neoliberal managerial discourse and at how it participates in shaping the way researchers, teachers and support staff perceive themselves and their experiences. It is based on a multiple case study and combines an intersectional and a socio-clinical approach. The empirical data is constituted by in-depth interviews with women conducted in Ireland and Chile, and includes some observations made in France. A thematic analysis of individual narratives of self-ascribed experiences of being bullied enables to look behind the veil drawn by managerial discourse, thus providing insights into power vectors and power domains contributing to workplace violence. It also shows that workplace bullying may reinforce identification to undervalued social categories. This contribution argues that neoliberal managerial discourse, by encouraging social representations of “neutral” individuals at work, or else celebrating their “diversity,” conceals power relations rooting on different social categories. This process influences one’s perception of one’s experience and its verbalization. At the same time, feeling assigned to one or more of undervalued social category can raise the perception of being bullied or discriminated against. While research has shown that only a minority of incidents of bullying and discrimination are reported within organizations, this contribution suggests that acknowledging the multiplicity and superposition of categories and their influence in shaping power relations could help secure a more collective and caring approach, and thus foster a safer work culture and atmosphere in research organizations.

Article
Publication date: 12 December 2019

Lina Trigos-Carrillo

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the literacy practices of the families and communities of first-generation college students in Latin America, and how community and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the literacy practices of the families and communities of first-generation college students in Latin America, and how community and family literacies can inform the understanding of first-generation college students’ identity and cultural values.

Design/methodology/approach

This transnational ethnography was conducted in local communities around three public universities in Mexico, Colombia and Costa Rica. Participants included nine fist-generation college students and more than 50 people in their families and communities (i.e. relatives, parents and friends). Data gathering occurred at the university outside the formal space of the classroom, at home, and in the community. Data were interpreted through the lens of the community cultural wealth framework.

Findings

The author found that first-generation college students and their families and communities engaged in rich literacy practices that have been overlooked in policy, research, and media. It is argued that the concept literacy capital is necessary to acknowledge the critical literacy practices communities engage in. Literacy capital was manifested in these communities to preserve cultural traditions, to sponsor literacy practices and to question and resist unjust sociopolitical circumstances.

Practical implications

The findings of this study should inform a culturally sustaining pedagogy of academic literacies in higher education. Beyond asset-based approaches to academic literacies in Latin America, critical perspectives to academic literacies teaching and learning are needed that acknowledge the Latin American complexities.

Originality/value

These findings are significant because they unveiled how people in local communities were informed about the sociopolitical dynamics at the national and international scale that affected or even threatened their local culture, and how they used their literacy capital to react critically to those situations.

Details

English Teaching: Practice & Critique, vol. 19 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1175-8708

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 27 November 2023

Mirit Rachamim and Lily Orland-Barak

This in-depth case study examined the mentor's role in mediating a culturally diverse community of student teachers-as-learners in the context of practice teaching in university…

Abstract

Purpose

This in-depth case study examined the mentor's role in mediating a culturally diverse community of student teachers-as-learners in the context of practice teaching in university teacher education in Israel. Specifically, it explored how the mentor's response to cultural aspects of learning to teach shaped the group's learning environment.

Design/methodology/approach

Data collection included 23 video-recorded meetings of the learning community and semi-structured interviews with all four participants.

Findings

Findings proposed six actions of the mentor that aimed at promoting an empathetic and supportive learning environment that encouraged collaborative talk around culturally diverse issues that surfaced during practice teaching. Implications for teacher education programs are presented and discussed.

Practical implications

The study offers a practical framework of tools (or mentor actions) that can help mentors to promote social interactions in culturally diverse mentoring conversational settings.

Originality/value

The study identified six actions that can serve as tools in mediating sensitive discourse to issues of diversity in communities of culturally diverse learners.

Details

International Journal of Mentoring and Coaching in Education, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-6854

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 14 August 2017

Heather Clark, Frederic Dimanche, Rebecca Cotter and Donna Lee-Rosen

This paper aims to provide perspectives on human capital challenges for the events industry in Canada. Industry and educator perspectives are featured in two segments of the paper.

995

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to provide perspectives on human capital challenges for the events industry in Canada. Industry and educator perspectives are featured in two segments of the paper.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper provides an overview of the events sector in Canada and includes a literature review clarifying key definitions and terms. Industry and educator perspectives highlight ongoing discussions related to some of the human capital challenges identified in the paper.

Findings

This paper explores challenges related to human capital such as the pressures of working in the events industry and finding a work – life balance given the demands of the profession. Human capital challenges related to the preparedness of professionals and the need for continued certification and training are also discussed. A potential solution considers licensing and industry-wide certification. Consideration of the benefits and requirements of industry-wide certification and licensing is ongoing.

Practical implications

This paper emphasizes the need for cooperation between industry and educators to ensure that new events professionals have the necessary skills training and can recognize the need to contribute to the events industry throughout their careers.

Originality/value

This paper considers perspectives from education and industry and emphasizes challenges that are relevant and current for existing and future events professionals in Canada.

Details

Worldwide Hospitality and Tourism Themes, vol. 9 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-4217

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 29 March 2024

Leslie Rogers, Megan Burke, Leslie Laud and Rebecca Herricks

This paper explores a five-year case example of two educators engaged in practice-based professional development (PBPD) for the Self-Regulated Strategy Development (SRSD) model in…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper explores a five-year case example of two educators engaged in practice-based professional development (PBPD) for the Self-Regulated Strategy Development (SRSD) model in a middle school. It examines the transformative effects and challenges of improving writing instruction, the activities involved and alternative PBPD delivery methods. Highlighting a collaborative effort between an institute of higher education (IHE), a middle school and ThinkSRSD, a PBPD for SRSD developer, the example underscores the long-term benefits and innovative insights into engaging with PBPD for SRSD over multiple years.

Design/methodology/approach

The case involves analyzing survey data collected over five years. These surveys, which included specific SRSD-related queries and open-ended questions, were instrumental in assessing the evolution of the educators’ perceptions regarding SRSD and their engagement with PBPD. Additionally, the paper details PBPD activities as documented in a research journal, providing a comprehensive account of the developmental process.

Findings

Through a cross-institutional partnership, two middle school general educators participated in PBPD for SRSD for 30 h across five years. Their engagement with PBPD progressed from initial introduction and implementation to facilitating PBPD for SRSD among peers and at the national level. Over time, the most consistently enacted SRSD action was “memorize it,” while actions such as “discuss it,” “support it” and “independent performance” showed greater variability. Both educators consistently praised SRSD and sought continued PBPD engagement over the five years.

Originality/value

Our case example is the first five-year analysis of PBPD for SRSD among general middle school educators, highlighting the benefits and challenges of adopting evidence-based writing instruction. Our example emphasizes the need for continuous and focused professional development in areas crucial for student success, including self-regulation, prewriting strategies and techniques for fostering independent performance. Moreover, the two middle school educators’ critical feedback is invaluable for refining PBPD for SRSD. This work also enriches professional development schools (PDS) literature by offering effective strategies to support middle school teachers in developing a vibrant writing community, a cornerstone for student advancement in writing.

Case study
Publication date: 1 May 2014

Amy L. Brownlee and Britt Isaac Beda

Lauren Tate began a new career at a new organization. Based on information she learned in a recent MBA Leadership course, Lauren approached her new workplace with the goal of…

Abstract

Case description

Lauren Tate began a new career at a new organization. Based on information she learned in a recent MBA Leadership course, Lauren approached her new workplace with the goal of being more strategic in her interpersonal interactions. She focussed on identifying and building sources of power in this new career and proactively managed her evolving relationships. At some levels, she was very successful and effective but some relationships were characterized by stress. The case asks students to analyze Lauren's actions to determine which were effective and how her actions could have been even more effective.

Details

The CASE Journal, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 1544-9106

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 April 2023

Fiona Sherwood-Johnson, Kirstein Rummery, Julia Lawrence, Kathryn Mackay, Kathryn Ramsay and Rebecca McGregor

Most abuse affecting older adults in the UK, as across Europe, takes place within caring relationships, where one person is disabled and needs care/support. This paper critically…

Abstract

Purpose

Most abuse affecting older adults in the UK, as across Europe, takes place within caring relationships, where one person is disabled and needs care/support. This paper critically appraises two of the key theoretical explanations. First, feminist theories of “intimate partner abuse” tell us that it is mostly men who perpetrate abuse against women. Second, “carer strain”: the stress caused by caring responsibilities, often with inadequate help from services. Neither fully reflects the complex dynamics of “dangerous care” leading to a lack of voice and choice in safeguarding responses. This paper aims to articulate the need for an overarching theoretical framework, informed by a deeper understanding of the intersectional risk factors that create and compound the diverse experiences of harm by disabled people and family carers over the life course.

Design/methodology/approach

The critical synthesis of the theoretical approaches informing UK policy and practice presented here arises from a structured literature review and discussions held with three relevant third sector agencies during the development of a research proposal.

Findings

No single theory fully explains dangerous care and there are significant gaps in policy, resources and practice across service sectors, highlighting the need for joint training, intersectional working and research across service sectors.

Originality/value

Drawing both on existing literature and on discussions across contrasting policy and practice sectors, this paper raises awareness of some less well-acknowledged complexities of abuse and responses to abuse in later life.

Details

The Journal of Adult Protection, vol. 25 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1466-8203

Keywords

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