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Article
Publication date: 11 January 2016

Anna Park, Rebecca L. Robinson, Meghan J Babcock and William Ickes

The purpose of this paper is to behaviorally validate the Rudeness Scale (RS), a self-report measure of the propensity to verbally abuse strangers, using both a…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to behaviorally validate the Rudeness Scale (RS), a self-report measure of the propensity to verbally abuse strangers, using both a retrospective design (Study 1) and a prospective design (Study 2).

Design/methodology/approach

In Study 1, participants (n=280) completed an online survey that contained the RS and a retrospective checklist measure that assessed how often they had engaged in specific confrontational behaviors during the past year. In Study 2 (n=109), participants first completed an online survey that contained the RS and then later completed an experimental session in which they received, and immediately responded to, rude instant messages sent by another “participant.”

Findings

In Study 1, a multiple regression analysis revealed that scores on the RS were positively associated (β=0.39) with scores on the retrospective checklist measure of ugly confrontational behaviors. In Study 2, a multiple regression analysis revealed that scores on the RS were positively associated (β=0.30) with the level of “retaliatory” rude behavior the participants displayed in their instant messaging conversation. Together, these findings reveal that people with high RS scores are more likely, first, to have acted in offensive and confrontational ways in the past (Study 1), and second, to act this way in the present (Study 2).

Originality/value

Although previous studies have provided evidence for the convergent validity of the RS and established a preliminary personality profile of rude individuals, the present studies are the first to explore the behavioral validity of the scale.

Details

Journal of Aggression, Conflict and Peace Research, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-6599

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Article
Publication date: 7 January 2014

Anna Park, William Ickes and Rebecca L. Robinson

The purpose of this research is to (1) to identify personality variables that reliably predict verbal rudeness ( i.e by replicating previous findings) and (2) to…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this research is to (1) to identify personality variables that reliably predict verbal rudeness ( i.e by replicating previous findings) and (2) to investigate what personality variables predict more general ugly confrontational behaviors.

Design/methodology/approach

In Study 1, the authors used an online survey to collect information regarding individual differences in social desirability, self-esteem, narcissism, blirtatiousness, behavioral inhibition, behavioral activation, conventional morality (CM), thin-skinned ego defensiveness (TSED), affect intensity for anger and frustration (AIAF), and verbal rudeness. In Study 2, the authors used a similar online survey to collect the same information, but extended the survey questionnaire to include measures of entitlement, psychopathology, Machiavellianism, and a retrospective checklist of ugly confrontational behaviors.

Findings

In Study 1, regression analyses revealed that CM, behavioral inhibition, and behavioral activation reward responsiveness were significant negative predictors of rudeness. AIAF, TSED and behavioral activation drive were significant positive predictors of rudeness. In Study 2, regression analyses revealed that CM was again a significant negative predictor of rudeness. AIAF, and narcissism were significant positive predictors of rudeness. CM also negatively predicted ugly confrontational behaviors, whereas AIAF, blirtatiousness, and Machiavellianism were positive predictors.

Originality/value

Although several measures of aggression exist, the current studies of rudeness and ugly confrontational behavior specifically assess tendencies to abuse strangers. These studies begin to establish a personality profile of the type of person that might abuse strangers.

Details

Journal of Aggression, Conflict and Peace Research, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-6599

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 11 January 2016

Jane L Ireland and Robert J. Cramer

Abstract

Details

Journal of Aggression, Conflict and Peace Research, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-6599

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Book part
Publication date: 20 January 2021

Kristie M. Young, William W. Stammerjohan, Rebecca J. Bennett and Andrea R. Drake

Psychological contracts represent unofficial or informal expectations that an individual holds, most commonly applied to an employer–employee relationship. Understanding…

Abstract

Psychological contracts represent unofficial or informal expectations that an individual holds, most commonly applied to an employer–employee relationship. Understanding psychological contracts helps explain the consequences of unmet expectations, including increased budgetary slack and reduced audit quality. This chapter reviews and synthesizes accounting behavioral research that discusses psychological contracts and that was published in academic and practitioner journals in the areas of financial accounting, management accounting, auditing, taxes, non-profit organizations, accounting education, and the accounting profession itself. Despite the prevalence of psychological contracts in the workplace and the applicability to behavioral research, accounting literature remains limited regarding applications of psychological contracts. This chapter aggregates research across all areas of accounting to provide suggestions for use of psychological contracts in future research and thus create a connected research stream.

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Book part
Publication date: 14 July 2014

Ann Robinson and Debbie Dailey

The various levels of research support undergirding effective practices are outlined. Evidence supporting specific programming, service delivery models, and curricular…

Abstract

The various levels of research support undergirding effective practices are outlined. Evidence supporting specific programming, service delivery models, and curricular interventions, and a subset of research-based classroom strategies for talented learners is reviewed. Trends and innovations for effective practices in the future are suggested.

Details

Gifted Education: Current Perspectives and Issues
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-741-2

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1978

The Equal Pay Act 1970 (which came into operation on 29 December 1975) provides for an “equality clause” to be written into all contracts of employment. S.1(2) (a) of the…

Abstract

The Equal Pay Act 1970 (which came into operation on 29 December 1975) provides for an “equality clause” to be written into all contracts of employment. S.1(2) (a) of the 1970 Act (which has been amended by the Sex Discrimination Act 1975) provides:

Details

Managerial Law, vol. 21 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0558

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Article
Publication date: 26 July 2013

Trung Thanh Nguyen and John Tenhunen

The authors aim to provide here an opinion on the state‐of‐the‐art of integrated ecological‐economic assessments of bioenergy under climate change, as well as the…

Abstract

Purpose

The authors aim to provide here an opinion on the state‐of‐the‐art of integrated ecological‐economic assessments of bioenergy under climate change, as well as the challenges along with their implications faced in planning adaptation at local scale.

Design/methodology/approach

Investments to reduce emissions must be made in the coming decades to avoid the risks posed by climate change. If these investments are made wisely, then costs will be manageable, stability in markets as well as energy security will be achieved, and even rural development and economic growth may be stimulated. The authors call attention to the need for modeling of climate change impacts by combining the outputs from appropriately designed crop simulation models with economic analyses. Combining natural science and economics in a compatible fashion at local scale will play an essential role in advancing communication and information exchange.

Findings

There are key differences in drivers or determinants of mitigation and adaptation potential and decisions at different scales, which means that different actors, different timescales and different spatial scales of decision making must be specifically considered. Understanding of the potential impacts of climate change requires disaggregation of the agricultural sector with appropriate detail. A critical trade‐off exists between area‐wide spatial coverage and an explicit consideration of local peculiarities.

Originality/value

The authors suggest that a much stronger effort must be made to meld natural science crop modeling approaches with economic analyses, to include spatially explicit consideration of conventional crop production along with 1st and 2nd generation bioenergy crops, and the evaluation not only of “best guess” scenarios of change, but also potential system impacts of extreme scenarios.

Details

International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management, vol. 5 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-8692

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Article
Publication date: 10 April 2018

Yan Liu, Bryan Fuller, Kim Hester, Rebecca J. Bennett and Marcia Simmering Dickerson

The purpose of this paper is to examine how authentic leadership influences employees’ workplace behavior through three intermediate mechanisms.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine how authentic leadership influences employees’ workplace behavior through three intermediate mechanisms.

Design/methodology/approach

The cross-sectional surveys were conducted at a large health organization with over 500 employees. Multi-source data were drawn from 124 employees and 16 supervisors.

Findings

This study provides empirical evidence that authentic leadership is positively related to subordinates’ proactive behavior and negatively related to subordinates’ workplace deviance behavior through mediation effects of three psychological factors, including supervisor identification, psychological safety, and job engagement.

Research limitations/implications

Due to the selected survey approach, the data are correlational. The small sample size of the study may reduce the ability to find statistically significant results. The current study would have benefited from organizational data on individual performance and proactive behavior, such as archival annual performance appraisals.

Practical implications

To practitioners, this study provides evidence that authentic leadership is sufficient in creating a positive work climate within which the employees feel safe to contribute their effort on their jobs. Based on the current findings, the practitioners can be more confident to hire or to promote authentic persons to be leaders in the organization.

Originality/value

This study is among those few empirical studies which help to validate the authentic leadership theory and provide a clear understanding of the mechanisms by which authentic leadership influences outcomes.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 39 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1991

Rebecca L. Gardner, Jeanne E. Boyle and Ellen Calhoun

Following enactment of the federal Endangered Species Act in 1973, a variety of organizations proceeded to establish lists of endangered, threatened, or rare species of…

Abstract

Following enactment of the federal Endangered Species Act in 1973, a variety of organizations proceeded to establish lists of endangered, threatened, or rare species of wildlife that they believed fell within their purview. State lists, as opposed to regional or national lists, are of particular importance because they form a rigorous record of the status of species in small, well‐defined geographic areas. State lists also indicate the development status of legal management efforts in the various states and are, therefore, predictors of how rigorously species variety will be maintained. Online searches of environment, legal, and government indexes (Enviroline, NTIS, Agricola, and others) demonstrated that there is no organized way to identify official state lists and that, in fact, few official lists are cited within the voluminous environment literature.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 19 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Article
Publication date: 21 November 2016

Rebecca Trowman Day, Richard Norman and Suzanne Robinson

Worldwide, there is significant growth in the cost of (and demand for) healthcare, which often clashes with a requirement to contain expenditure. This duality leads to an…

Abstract

Purpose

Worldwide, there is significant growth in the cost of (and demand for) healthcare, which often clashes with a requirement to contain expenditure. This duality leads to an increasing need for a systematic approach to disinvestment in health technologies. The purpose of this paper is to consider the challenges and opportunities for disinvestment policy decisions in Australia. It discusses the implementation of the Choosing Wisely campaign and the need for rigorous evaluation of such campaigns in the Australian healthcare system.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors highlight characteristics of disinvestment: what it is and what it is not and discuss international examples of identifying low value care, including the recent Choosing Wisely initiative. The authors discuss the barriers to implementing initiatives such as Choosing Wisely and the complexities in evaluating their effectiveness.

Findings

While the primary purpose of the Choosing Wisely campaign is improved decision making through clinical engagement, it is expected that implementation could lead to resource savings alongside improvements in patient safety and service quality. While there is research looking to understand the barriers and facilitators to the implementation of initiatives such as Choosing Wisely, little is known about broader patient impacts, and more attention on the quantification of their effect on both patient outcomes and resource use is needed.

Originality/value

This work highlights the limited knowledge around implementation of disinvestment strategies and the paucity of research around the impact of strategies such as Choosing Wisely in the Australian public hospital system. This is important as future research in this area will give greater certainty about the benefits and consequences of Choosing Wisely leading to improved opportunities for resource savings and patient safety and quality.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 30 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

Keywords

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