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Article
Publication date: 9 February 2015

Rebecca Halpern and Chimene Tucker

– The purpose of this paper is to apply adult-centered learning theories to online information literacy tutorials.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to apply adult-centered learning theories to online information literacy tutorials.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a conceptual paper that examines the application of adult learning theories to online information literacy tutorials. The application is supported by examples from the literature of libraries and higher education, and from the writers’ own experiences with designing online tutorials informed by adult learning theories.

Findings

As online learners continue to be a growing population on our campuses, and as those online learners continue to be older than our traditional students, librarians must be prepared to design information literacy objects tailored to the unique learning styles of adults. Building from Knowles’ theory of andragogy, online tutorials that are informed by adult-centered strategies can be powerful tools for engaging with the adult online learner.

Practical implications

This article gives a useful and comprehensive overview of adult learning theory as applied by education and library researchers. It also provides a specific example of how those theories can be implemented in online tutorials through the Information Literacy Toolkit the authors created.

Originality/value

While there is literature on applying adult learning theory to library environments, little of it addresses how to do so in an asynchronous, self-paced tutorial. This is a contribution to the literature on asynchronous learning environments and suggests concrete ways to incorporate an adult-centered approach to digital learning objects.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 43 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Article
Publication date: 9 February 2015

Joan Petit and Sara Thompson

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Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 43 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2005

Patricia Ahmed and Rebecca Jean Emigh

Two perspectives provide alternative insights into household composition in contemporary Eastern Europe. The first stresses that individuals have relatively fixed…

Abstract

Two perspectives provide alternative insights into household composition in contemporary Eastern Europe. The first stresses that individuals have relatively fixed preferences about living arrangements and diverge from them only when they cannot attain their ideal. The second major approach, the adaptive strategies perspective, predicts that individuals have few preferences. Instead, they use household composition to cope with economic hardship, deploy labor, or care for children or the elderly. This article evaluates these approaches in five post‐socialist East‐European countries, Bulgaria, Hungary, Poland, Romania, and Russia, using descriptive statistics and logistic regression. The results suggest that household extension is common in these countries and provide the most evidence for the adaptive strategies perspective. In particular, the results show that variables operationalizing the adaptive strategies perspective, including measures of single motherhood, retirement status, agricultural cultivation, and poverty, increase the odds of household extension.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 25 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

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Book part
Publication date: 11 December 2007

Elizabeth Mitchell Armstrong

Like all tribes, bioethics has its own origin myths. According to these myths, bioethics emerged in the latter half of the twentieth century when new technologies and…

Abstract

Like all tribes, bioethics has its own origin myths. According to these myths, bioethics emerged in the latter half of the twentieth century when new technologies and scientific developments challenged the norms that had traditionally governed clinical practice. Theologians, philosophers, clergy, judges, lawyers, journalists and ordinary people – the “strangers at the bedside” in David J. Rothman's memorable phrasing – began to take an interest in moral matters that previously had been the realm of physicians alone. Codes of research ethics were formulated in response to the Nazi atrocities; hospital ethics committees were established in sensitivity to the emerging notion of “patients’ rights.” Bioethics was born.

Details

Bioethical Issues, Sociological Perspectives
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-7623-1438-6

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Book part
Publication date: 11 December 2007

Renee R. Anspach and Sydney A. Halpern

Let us return to Nancy Cruzan's story. Hopeful that Nancy would eventually recover, her parents, Lester and Joyce Cruzan, agreed to have doctors insert a feeding tube to…

Abstract

Let us return to Nancy Cruzan's story. Hopeful that Nancy would eventually recover, her parents, Lester and Joyce Cruzan, agreed to have doctors insert a feeding tube to deliver artificial hydration and nutrition – a decision they would one day regret. Although the Cruzans visited frequently, Nancy was unable to respond to their attention. After four years had elapsed, the Cruzans concluded that Nancy would never regain consciousness and should be allowed to die.

Details

Bioethical Issues, Sociological Perspectives
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-7623-1438-6

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Book part
Publication date: 11 December 2007

Abstract

Details

Bioethical Issues, Sociological Perspectives
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-7623-1438-6

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Article
Publication date: 23 September 2013

Anthony Scott Leicht, Rebecca M. Sealey and Sue Devine

There has been considerable interest in worksite health programmes to improve employee health and productivity with programme effectiveness possibly influenced by…

Abstract

Purpose

There has been considerable interest in worksite health programmes to improve employee health and productivity with programme effectiveness possibly influenced by employment category and gender. The purpose of this paper is to examine the current quality of life (QOL), physical activity (PA) levels, sitting times, and barriers/motivators to undertaking PA between academic and professional, and male and female staff within a university workplace.

Design/methodology/approach

Participants (105 males, 192 females, n=297) employed as full-time staff of a regional university completed an online survey with differences between staff categories (academic vs professional) and genders identified via ANCOVA using sitting time and working hours as covariates. Relationships between variables were assessed using Spearman's Rank correlations.

Findings

Academic and male staff reported greater working hours (∼7-25 per cent, p<0.05) but similar QOL, seven-day total PA (∼3,600 MET-minutes per week) and sitting times (∼6-7 hours per day) compared to professional and female staff. The most common barriers for PA were lack of time or energy, with motivators including to feel good or improve health. Male staff reported these less frequently compared to females (∼13-25 per cent, p<0.05). Significant correlations between working hours and QOL (=−0.157 to −0.220, p<0.05), sitting time and QOL (=−0.195 to 0.171, p<0.05), and PA levels and QOL (=0.141-0.192, p<0.05) were identified for all staff.

Originality/value

The current study has demonstrated significant employment and gender differences in working hours with staff exhibiting similar QOL, PA and sitting levels. Gender differences in working hours, and PA barriers/motivators may provide important foci for the development of worksite health programmes to improve staff health and well-being.

Details

International Journal of Workplace Health Management, vol. 6 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8351

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Article
Publication date: 2 August 2013

Alison Bullock, Fiona Fox, Rebecca Barnes, Natasha Doran, Wendy Hardyman, Duncan Moss and Mark Stacey

The purpose of this paper is to describe experiences of transition from medical school to new doctor in the UK and to examine the development and evaluation of initiatives…

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1416

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe experiences of transition from medical school to new doctor in the UK and to examine the development and evaluation of initiatives designed to lessen anxiety and assist transition.

Design/methodology/approach

The evaluations of two recent interventions for new doctors are reported, one at organisational and one at the individual level: first, a longer induction programme; and second, provision of a library of medical textbooks on smartphones (the “iDoc” project). The paper also reports on mindfulness training designed to help trainees' well‐being.

Findings

These initiatives address different aspects of transition challenges (related to roles and responsibilities, cognitive and environmental factors). Benefit can be gained from multiple approaches to supporting this time of uncertainty.

Practical implications

Given the link between transition, doctor stress and patient safety, there is a need to review existing strategies to ameliorate the stress associated with transition and seek novel ways to support new doctors. The authors argue that diverse approaches, targeted at both the organisational and individual level, can support new trainees, both practically and emotionally.

Originality/value

The paper reports initiatives that support transition, of value to medical schools, deaneries, researchers and trainees themselves.

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Article
Publication date: 12 March 2018

Elizabeth S. Barnert, Laura S. Abrams, Lello Tesema, Rebecca Dudovitz, Bergen B. Nelson, Tumaini Coker, Eraka Bath, Christopher Biely, Ning Li and Paul J. Chung

Although incarceration may have life-long negative health effects, little is known about associations between child incarceration and subsequent adult health outcomes. The…

Abstract

Purpose

Although incarceration may have life-long negative health effects, little is known about associations between child incarceration and subsequent adult health outcomes. The paper aims to discuss this issue.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors analyzed data from 14,689 adult participants in the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health (Add Health) to compare adult health outcomes among those first incarcerated between 7 and 13 years of age (child incarceration); first incarcerated at>or=14 years of age; and never incarcerated.

Findings

Compared to the other two groups, those with a history of child incarceration were disproportionately black or Hispanic, male, and from lower socio-economic strata. Additionally, individuals incarcerated as children had worse adult health outcomes, including general health, functional limitations (climbing stairs), depressive symptoms, and suicidality, than those first incarcerated at older ages or never incarcerated.

Research limitations/implications

Despite the limitations of the secondary database analysis, these findings suggest that incarcerated children are an especially medically vulnerable population.

Practical implications

Programs and policies that address these medically vulnerable children’s health needs through comprehensive health and social services in place of, during, and/or after incarceration are needed.

Social implications

Meeting these unmet health and social service needs offers an important opportunity to achieve necessary health care and justice reform for children.

Originality/value

No prior studies have examined the longitudinal relationship between child incarceration and adult health outcomes.

Details

International Journal of Prisoner Health, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1744-9200

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Book part
Publication date: 11 June 2001

Rebecca Wells, Shoou-Yih Daniel Lee and Jeffrey A Alexander

In this article the authors explore how institutionalized social ties may buffer organizations against threats to survival and then even at the brink of extinction enable…

Abstract

In this article the authors explore how institutionalized social ties may buffer organizations against threats to survival and then even at the brink of extinction enable them to merge instead of close. Drawing on social capital theory, we propose that legitimating and mutualistic ties both buffer and enable organizations. We examine this proposition by first testing how both types of social ties affect the likelihood of either merging into other organizations or closing entirely. We then test how the same ties affect the likelihood of merging relative to closing for organizations that undergo one of these two events. Results from the U.S. hospital industry provide little support for the hypothesized buffering roles of social ties but greater support for the enabling roles of such ties. It appears that certain social ties yield corporate social capital that reduces endangered organizations' losses but yield little or no social capital that protects against the threat to their survival in the first place.

Details

Social Capital of Organizations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76230-770-8

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