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Book part
Publication date: 4 November 2014

Rebecca Beals and Robert Fiala

This report provides information on the cultural environment of professionals concerned with disability, and the implications of that environment for the inclusion and…

Abstract

Purpose

This report provides information on the cultural environment of professionals concerned with disability, and the implications of that environment for the inclusion and participation of disabled persons in society. We place that environment within an historical context sensitive to the role of power and the constructed nature of the social world to illustrate the importance of cultural environments for understanding factors shaping inclusion of disabled persons.

Design/methodology/approach

We use data from coding terms used in the Review of Educational Research for nearly 80 years to examine the cultural environment of professionals concerned with disabilities and suggest such an environment may characterize many professions and the social sciences generally. We examine 23 terms used in academic discourse to refer to disabled populations, tracking change in use of the terms over 80 years.

Findings

There has been increased attention to disability from the 1930s to the early 2000s. The increase has been accompanied by a decline in use of terms undermining the dignity and capability of disabled persons, and an increase in terms providing a context for dignity and capability. Such changes suggest a cultural environment propitious for inclusion and participation of disabled and disadvantaged persons.

Social implications

Implications are considered through a model noting the role of a positive cultural environment in shaping inclusion and participation of disabled populations. The model suggests the power and limitations of cultural environments, while at the same time noting the role of countervailing processes hindering greater inclusion and participation.

Details

Environmental Contexts and Disability
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-262-3

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 4 November 2014

Abstract

Details

Environmental Contexts and Disability
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-262-3

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 4 November 2014

Abstract

Details

Environmental Contexts and Disability
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-262-3

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Book part
Publication date: 19 November 2015

Rebecca Grossman, Zachary Rosch, David Mazer and Eduardo Salas

Cohesion is a key contributor to team effectiveness, leading to great interest in understanding how to diagnose, monitor, and enhance it in practice. However, there is…

Abstract

Cohesion is a key contributor to team effectiveness, leading to great interest in understanding how to diagnose, monitor, and enhance it in practice. However, there is great inconsistency in how cohesion is conceptualized and measured, making it difficult to compare findings across studies, and therefore limiting the ability to advance science and practice. To begin addressing these issues, we draw from qualitative and quantitative analyses and extract themes indicating what matters most for effective cohesion measurement. Such themes are presented around six major questions – who, what, when, where, why, and how – as they pertain to each major component of the cohesion measurement process. Emerging approaches to cohesion measurement and corresponding avenues for future research are also discussed.

Details

Team Cohesion: Advances in Psychological Theory, Methods and Practice
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-283-2

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Article
Publication date: 28 December 2020

Paul Tristen Balwant, Rebecca Mohammed and Riann Singh

The purpose of the present study is to investigate mediating mechanisms in the relationship between the training and development climate at higher education institutions…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the present study is to investigate mediating mechanisms in the relationship between the training and development climate at higher education institutions and administrative employees' productivity. Organizational identification theory and the job demands-resources model are used to investigate supervisor support, employees' motivation to learn and employee engagement as mediators.

Design/methodology/approach

Survey research was used to collect data from 289 administrative staff members employed at five higher education institutions in Trinidad and Tobago.

Findings

The findings supported the hypothesized mediating role of supervisor support, employees' motivation to learn and employee engagement in the relationship between organizations' training and development climate and employee productivity.

Social implications

Productivity is a major problem in Trinidad and Tobago. In Trinidad and Tobago's higher education sector, productivity deficiencies are particularly problematic because of the gradual reduction in government subsidies. Therefore, higher education institutions must improve productivity, particularly administrative employees' productivity, in order to compete with local and international tertiary education institutions. This study contributes to Trinidad and Tobago's society by showing the importance of both a positive training and development climate and supervisor support to influence administrative employees' affective states and productivity in tertiary education institutions.

Originality/value

This study adds to existing research on training and development and employee productivity by introducing novel and theoretically sound mediators to clarify how the relationship between a higher education institution's training and development climate and its administrative employees' productivity unfolds.

Details

Journal of Applied Research in Higher Education, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-7003

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1947

OUR publication date precludes more than the beginning of our study on the Library Association Conference which, from the point of view of numbers, has been one of the…

Abstract

OUR publication date precludes more than the beginning of our study on the Library Association Conference which, from the point of view of numbers, has been one of the largest. We shall continue in our next issue such comment upon it as the importance of the subjects under discussion would seem to warrant.

Details

New Library World, vol. 49 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Abstract

Details

Library Review, vol. 52 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1918

At a meeting of the Council of the Royal Borough of Kensington on February 12th, 1918, Councillor Dr. A. J. Rice‐Oxley, Chairman of the Public Health Committee, brought up…

Abstract

At a meeting of the Council of the Royal Borough of Kensington on February 12th, 1918, Councillor Dr. A. J. Rice‐Oxley, Chairman of the Public Health Committee, brought up a Report as follows :—

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 20 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 11 April 2016

Oluremi Bolanle Ayoko

This paper aims to clarify the relationship between conflict, apologies, forgiveness and willingness to cooperate after a conflict event.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to clarify the relationship between conflict, apologies, forgiveness and willingness to cooperate after a conflict event.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper used scenarios and quantitative measures to examine the connection between conflict, perceived apology sincerity, forgiveness and willingness to cooperate in 358 business undergraduates.

Findings

Data revealed that relationship conflict was significantly but negatively associated with forgiveness and willingness to cooperate. Additionally, attitudes toward forgiveness were directly and positively related not only to forgiveness but also to willingness to cooperate. Finally, forgiveness mediated the link between both perceived apology sincerity attitudes to forgiveness and willingness to cooperate.

Research limitations/implications

Data were cross-sectional and may be subject to bias. Longitudinal studies are needed to further tease out the connection between the variables in the current study. Similarly, future research should explore the role of climate and individuals’ disposition and readiness to apologize, forgive and their willingness to cooperate at work.

Practical implications

The paper includes practical implications for managers interested in eliciting cooperation after a workplace conflict. Specifically, apology and forgiveness should be included in managers’ conflict management training programs.

Social implications

Our findings indicated that apology and forgiveness are social skills that are important for conflict management and cooperation after a workplace conflict.

Originality/value

Beyond reconciliation, the current study provides new insights into the important role of actual forgiveness in whether employees are willing to cooperate after conflict at work. Practical assistance is offered to managers who are interested in fostering cooperation and increased performance after conflict episodes.

Details

International Journal of Conflict Management, vol. 27 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1044-4068

Keywords

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