Search results

1 – 10 of 13
Book part
Publication date: 4 November 2014

Rebecca Beals and Robert Fiala

This report provides information on the cultural environment of professionals concerned with disability, and the implications of that environment for the inclusion and…

Abstract

Purpose

This report provides information on the cultural environment of professionals concerned with disability, and the implications of that environment for the inclusion and participation of disabled persons in society. We place that environment within an historical context sensitive to the role of power and the constructed nature of the social world to illustrate the importance of cultural environments for understanding factors shaping inclusion of disabled persons.

Design/methodology/approach

We use data from coding terms used in the Review of Educational Research for nearly 80 years to examine the cultural environment of professionals concerned with disabilities and suggest such an environment may characterize many professions and the social sciences generally. We examine 23 terms used in academic discourse to refer to disabled populations, tracking change in use of the terms over 80 years.

Findings

There has been increased attention to disability from the 1930s to the early 2000s. The increase has been accompanied by a decline in use of terms undermining the dignity and capability of disabled persons, and an increase in terms providing a context for dignity and capability. Such changes suggest a cultural environment propitious for inclusion and participation of disabled and disadvantaged persons.

Social implications

Implications are considered through a model noting the role of a positive cultural environment in shaping inclusion and participation of disabled populations. The model suggests the power and limitations of cultural environments, while at the same time noting the role of countervailing processes hindering greater inclusion and participation.

Details

Environmental Contexts and Disability
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-262-3

Keywords

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 4 November 2014

Abstract

Details

Environmental Contexts and Disability
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-262-3

Book part
Publication date: 4 November 2014

Abstract

Details

Environmental Contexts and Disability
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-262-3

Book part
Publication date: 19 November 2015

Rebecca Grossman, Zachary Rosch, David Mazer and Eduardo Salas

Cohesion is a key contributor to team effectiveness, leading to great interest in understanding how to diagnose, monitor, and enhance it in practice. However, there is…

Abstract

Cohesion is a key contributor to team effectiveness, leading to great interest in understanding how to diagnose, monitor, and enhance it in practice. However, there is great inconsistency in how cohesion is conceptualized and measured, making it difficult to compare findings across studies, and therefore limiting the ability to advance science and practice. To begin addressing these issues, we draw from qualitative and quantitative analyses and extract themes indicating what matters most for effective cohesion measurement. Such themes are presented around six major questions – who, what, when, where, why, and how – as they pertain to each major component of the cohesion measurement process. Emerging approaches to cohesion measurement and corresponding avenues for future research are also discussed.

Details

Team Cohesion: Advances in Psychological Theory, Methods and Practice
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-283-2

Keywords

Abstract

Details

The Ultimate Guide to Compact Cases: Case Research, Writing, and Teaching
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80382-847-3

Abstract

Organizational researchers studying well-being – as well as organizations themselves – often place much of the burden on employees to manage and preserve their own well-being. Missing from this discussion is how – from a human resources management (HRM) perspective – organizations and managers can directly and positively shape the well-being of their employees. The authors use this review to paint a picture of what organizations could be like if they valued people holistically and embraced the full experience of employees’ lives to promote well-being at work. In so doing, the authors tackle five challenges that managers may have to help their employees navigate, but to date have received more limited empirical and theoretical attention from an HRM perspective: (1) recovery at work; (2) women’s health; (3) concealable stigmas; (4) caregiving; and (5) coping with socio-environmental jolts. In each section, the authors highlight how past research has treated managerial or organizational support on these topics, and pave the way for where research needs to advance from an HRM perspective. The authors conclude with ideas for tackling these issues methodologically and analytically, highlighting ways to recruit and support more vulnerable samples that are encapsulated within these topics, as well as analytic approaches to study employee experiences more holistically. In sum, this review represents a call for organizations to now – more than ever – build thriving organizations.

Details

Research in Personnel and Human Resources Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80455-046-5

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 28 December 2020

Paul Tristen Balwant, Rebecca Mohammed and Riann Singh

The purpose of the present study is to investigate mediating mechanisms in the relationship between the training and development climate at higher education institutions…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the present study is to investigate mediating mechanisms in the relationship between the training and development climate at higher education institutions and administrative employees' productivity. Organizational identification theory and the job demands-resources model are used to investigate supervisor support, employees' motivation to learn and employee engagement as mediators.

Design/methodology/approach

Survey research was used to collect data from 289 administrative staff members employed at five higher education institutions in Trinidad and Tobago.

Findings

The findings supported the hypothesized mediating role of supervisor support, employees' motivation to learn and employee engagement in the relationship between organizations' training and development climate and employee productivity.

Social implications

Productivity is a major problem in Trinidad and Tobago. In Trinidad and Tobago's higher education sector, productivity deficiencies are particularly problematic because of the gradual reduction in government subsidies. Therefore, higher education institutions must improve productivity, particularly administrative employees' productivity, in order to compete with local and international tertiary education institutions. This study contributes to Trinidad and Tobago's society by showing the importance of both a positive training and development climate and supervisor support to influence administrative employees' affective states and productivity in tertiary education institutions.

Originality/value

This study adds to existing research on training and development and employee productivity by introducing novel and theoretically sound mediators to clarify how the relationship between a higher education institution's training and development climate and its administrative employees' productivity unfolds.

Details

Journal of Applied Research in Higher Education, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-7003

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 1947

OUR publication date precludes more than the beginning of our study on the Library Association Conference which, from the point of view of numbers, has been one of the…

Abstract

OUR publication date precludes more than the beginning of our study on the Library Association Conference which, from the point of view of numbers, has been one of the largest. We shall continue in our next issue such comment upon it as the importance of the subjects under discussion would seem to warrant.

Details

New Library World, vol. 49 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

Content available
243

Abstract

Details

Library Review, vol. 52 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 17 January 2022

Rebecca Dickason

Purpose: As specific emotional arenas, hospitals are characterized by the interweaving of various emotional requirements, arising from different sources of norms, rules…

Abstract

Purpose: As specific emotional arenas, hospitals are characterized by the interweaving of various emotional requirements, arising from different sources of norms, rules, or guidelines. This study aims to highlight an often-overlooked dimension of emotional labor in healthcare by describing the coexistence of emotional rules (i.e. feeling and/or display rules) through a multilevel perspective (institutional level, cluster/department level, service level, ward level, professional level). Study Design/Methodology/Approach: These emotional requirements for nurses and nursing assistants are investigated through three sets of data (observation, interviews, and internal documents) in a French public hospital, focusing on two hospital services: three long-term care units (primary field of investigation), and five adult medical emergency wards (secondary field of investigation). Findings: The results of the analysis show the pervasive nature of emotional requirements which are intertwined and more or less implicit/explicit according to the level analyzed. In addition to organizational rules, professional and social emotional rules contribute to shaping emotional requirements, particularly through rules of “empathetic expression” and those of retenue bienveillante. Research Limitations/Implications: This research has contributed to showing the dynamic nature of emotional requirements and their appropriation and modulation by healthcare professionals. The qualitative methodology used allows for unique insights but limits the generalization of results. Originality/Value: This research has addressed various gaps in the existing literature by describing emotional requirements through a multilevel analysis, by outlining a set of rules that had not been previously described (retenue bienveillante) and by including the population of nursing assistants as well as nurses in a study on hospital emotional labor. Future research could envisage spatial analysis of emotional labor to help better understand emotional requirements' variability according to emotionalized zones.

1 – 10 of 13