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Article
Publication date: 1 May 2001

Rebecca Angeles

Aims to establish a basic conceptual framework for understanding extranet implementation guidelines. Provides a specific case using VF Playwear, Inc.’s HealthTexbtob.com…

Abstract

Aims to establish a basic conceptual framework for understanding extranet implementation guidelines. Provides a specific case using VF Playwear, Inc.’s HealthTexbtob.com, a business‐to‐business extranet for linking VF with its customers. Owing to the heavy pressure to create a Web presence in the digital marketspace, some firms have found it beneficial to work with e‐business solution providers that can assist them through the critical points of the development life cycle. VF Playwear, Inc. manufactures children’s clothing and is part of the VF Corporation umbrella that supplies such well‐known clothing brands as Wrangler, Lee, Rustler, Vanity Fair, and Vassarette, among others. Lessons learned by VF Playwear, Inc., in close collaboration with MERANT E‐Solutions (enterprise solutions) and Egility I‐Solutions (infrastructure solutions), are featured in this case study.

Details

Internet Research, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1066-2243

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2000

Rebecca Angeles and Ravinder Nath

Examines the importance of congruence between trading partners, along several dimensions, for the successful implementation of EDI networks. The results of a survey of 64…

Abstract

Examines the importance of congruence between trading partners, along several dimensions, for the successful implementation of EDI networks. The results of a survey of 64 dyads, drawn from US manufacturing firms and their suppliers, are reported, which suggest that congruence is not a critical factor in determining successful EDI implementation, at least amongst firms operating a “traditional” EDI system, in which the links are direct, rather than via the Internet and where the customer has significant bargaining power.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 5 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2000

Rebecca Angeles

The electronic commerce (EC) marketplace is evolving so rapidly that the role of EDI, the technology that originally kickstarted the EC phenomenon to begin with, needs to…

Abstract

The electronic commerce (EC) marketplace is evolving so rapidly that the role of EDI, the technology that originally kickstarted the EC phenomenon to begin with, needs to be clarified under current conditions. Explores the way the Internet is expected to spur much higher EDI diffusion rates at much lower costs across industries. Value added networks (VANs) that firms primarily relied upon for traditional EDI connections have also redesigned their software product and service offerings to align with Internet‐enabled possibilities. On a much larger scale, the electronic marketplace is itself being reorganized as Internet‐EDI (I‐EDI) facilitates the formation of intranets, extranets, and now, “supranets”.

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Logistics Information Management, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-6053

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2001

Donald W. Hendon

Considers how non‐Thais can negotiate successfully withe business and government executives in Thailand. Gives an overview of Thailand’s geography, climate, population…

Abstract

Considers how non‐Thais can negotiate successfully withe business and government executives in Thailand. Gives an overview of Thailand’s geography, climate, population, religion and business practice. Discusses important aspects of the social‐cultural environment that have a significant effect on the way Thai’s negotiate. Includes further tips regarding body language, entertainment protocol, how to dress, and favourite negotiating tactics by buyers and sellers. Provides conclusions and directions for further research.

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Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 13 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 2007

Rebecca Angeles

This empirical study of consumer/shopper response to radio frequency identification (RFID) product item tagging anticipates what is likely to take place in the retail…

Abstract

Purpose

This empirical study of consumer/shopper response to radio frequency identification (RFID) product item tagging anticipates what is likely to take place in the retail marketplace. Using the theories of procedural justice/fairness, expected utility, and prior literature on personal privacy the purpose of this study is to use the survey method to measure consumer willingness to purchase RFID‐tagged product items within the Canadian context. Procedural justice/fairness is operationalized using the implementation of the Personal Information Protection and Electronic Documents Act (PIPEDA) enacted in Canada on January 1, 2004.

Design/methodology/approach

This study used the survey questionnaire method after the sample participants (N=381) were exposed to an experimental treatment. Students and faculty members of the Faculty of Business Administration, University of New Brunswick Fredericton, Canada participated in this study.

Findings

Consumers responded positively to the procedural justice concept using PIPEDA law in Canada. The less privacy sensitive group valued the specific RFID benefits, was willing to buy the tagged items to obtain specific benefits, was willing to pay more for these items, and was also less concerned about selected RFID issues.

Practical implications

Practical suggestions are given to retailers thinking of implementing product item RFID tagging to make their initiatives more successful.

Originality/value

This is one of the first empirical studies on the likely consumer response to product item tagging based on solid theoretical foundations.

Details

Industrial Management & Data Systems, vol. 107 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-5577

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1998

Rebecca Angeles, Ravinder Nath and Donald W. Hendon

Electronic data interchange (EDI) is a critical technology used in supply chain management systems involving logistics functions. This study explores the construct of…

Abstract

Electronic data interchange (EDI) is a critical technology used in supply chain management systems involving logistics functions. This study explores the construct of “level of EDI implementation” in order to establish its relationship with system success and the criticality of selected implementation factors. Using the survey method that employed a pair of questionnaires for a customer‐supplier dyad engaged in EDI, the final data set consists of 128 firms constituting 64 dyads. Level of EDI implementation is positively related to one out of four EDI system success measures and is associated with the criticality of the following implementation factors: use of cross‐functional EDI teams, the conduct of pilot projects, the inclusion of security and auditing controls, the conduct of training for end users, maintenance of trading partner relationships, use of value‐added network services, and guidelines for digital signatures.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 28 no. 9/10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

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Article
Publication date: 20 March 2007

Rebecca Angeles and Ravi Nath

The paper seeks to pursue the understanding of current business‐to‐business e‐procurement practices by describing the success factors and challenges to its implementation…

Abstract

Purpose

The paper seeks to pursue the understanding of current business‐to‐business e‐procurement practices by describing the success factors and challenges to its implementation in the corporate setting.

Design/methodology/approach

Members of the Institute for Supply Management and the Council of Logistics Management were asked to respond to a survey questionnaire. Factor analysis was used to analyze data from valid responses received from 185 firms.

Findings

Factor analysis resulted in three e‐procurement success factors (SF):supplier and contract management; end‐user behavior and e‐procurement business processes; and information and e‐procurement infrastructure. Three challenge‐to‐implementation factors (CIF) also emerged: lack of system integration and standardization issues; immaturity of e‐procurement‐based market services and end‐user resistance; and maverick buying and difficulty in integrating e‐commerce with other systems.

Research limitations/implications

A representative sampling design should be used in the future to be able to make claims for generalizable results.

Practical implications

E‐procurement is a very important initiative with significant cost savings potential for firms. This study's findings can guide various stages of corporate implementation efforts.

Originality/value

This study fulfills the need for solid empirical findings on this very important topic that has a direct impact on a firm's bottom line. E‐procurement is still in the early stages of marketplace deployment and guidance is still needed on how to do it right.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 6 February 2009

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 29 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

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Article
Publication date: 12 March 2018

Elizabeth S. Barnert, Laura S. Abrams, Lello Tesema, Rebecca Dudovitz, Bergen B. Nelson, Tumaini Coker, Eraka Bath, Christopher Biely, Ning Li and Paul J. Chung

Although incarceration may have life-long negative health effects, little is known about associations between child incarceration and subsequent adult health outcomes. The…

Abstract

Purpose

Although incarceration may have life-long negative health effects, little is known about associations between child incarceration and subsequent adult health outcomes. The paper aims to discuss this issue.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors analyzed data from 14,689 adult participants in the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health (Add Health) to compare adult health outcomes among those first incarcerated between 7 and 13 years of age (child incarceration); first incarcerated at>or=14 years of age; and never incarcerated.

Findings

Compared to the other two groups, those with a history of child incarceration were disproportionately black or Hispanic, male, and from lower socio-economic strata. Additionally, individuals incarcerated as children had worse adult health outcomes, including general health, functional limitations (climbing stairs), depressive symptoms, and suicidality, than those first incarcerated at older ages or never incarcerated.

Research limitations/implications

Despite the limitations of the secondary database analysis, these findings suggest that incarcerated children are an especially medically vulnerable population.

Practical implications

Programs and policies that address these medically vulnerable children’s health needs through comprehensive health and social services in place of, during, and/or after incarceration are needed.

Social implications

Meeting these unmet health and social service needs offers an important opportunity to achieve necessary health care and justice reform for children.

Originality/value

No prior studies have examined the longitudinal relationship between child incarceration and adult health outcomes.

Details

International Journal of Prisoner Health, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1744-9200

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Article
Publication date: 19 August 2019

Rebecca Lengnick-Hall, Karissa Fenwick, Michael S. Hurlburt, Amy Green, Rachel A. Askew and Gregory A. Aarons

Researchers suggest that adaptation should be a planned process, with practitioners actively consulting with program developers or academic partners, but few studies have…

Abstract

Purpose

Researchers suggest that adaptation should be a planned process, with practitioners actively consulting with program developers or academic partners, but few studies have examined how adaptation unfolds during evidence-based practice (EBP) implementation. The purpose of this paper is to describe real-world adaptation discussions and the conditions under which they occurred during the implementation of a new practice across multiple county child welfare systems.

Design/methodology/approach

This study qualitatively examines 127 meeting notes to understand how implementers and researchers talk about adaptation during the implementation of SafeCare, an EBP aimed at reducing child maltreatment and neglect.

Findings

Several types of adaptation discussions emerged. First, because it appeared difficult to get staff to talk about adaptation in group settings, meeting participants discussed factors that hindered adaptation conversations. Next, they discussed types of adaptations that they made or would like to make. Finally, they discussed adaptation as a normal part of SafeCare implementation.

Research limitations/implications

Limitations include data collection by a single research team member and focus on a particular EBP. However, this study provides new insight into how stakeholders naturally discuss adaptation needs, ideas and concerns.

Practical implications

Understanding adaptation discussions can help managers engage frontline staff who are using newly implemented EBPs, identify adaptation needs and solutions, and proactively support individuals who are balancing adaptation and fidelity during implementation.

Originality/value

This study’s unique data captured in vivo interactions that occurred at various time points during the implementation of an EBP rather than drawing upon data collected from more scripted and cross-sectional formats. Multiple child welfare and implementation stakeholders and types of interactions were examined.

Details

Journal of Children's Services, vol. 14 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-6660

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