Search results

1 – 6 of 6
Article
Publication date: 1 February 1992

Anthony A. Zikiye and Rebecca A. Zikiye

Builds on prior research into the impact of automation on jobcharacteristics, which found that co‐ordination, job autonomy, and workpace were reinforced by automation…

Abstract

Builds on prior research into the impact of automation on job characteristics, which found that co‐ordination, job autonomy, and work pace were reinforced by automation, while new skill requirements, job security and exertion remained unaffected. Job satisfaction correlates reveal the existence of elements both reinforced by automation and unrelated to job satisfaction. Such elements represent sources of operator indifference to the benefits of automation or satisfaction gaps, and they include interdepartmental task co‐ordination, discretion in making production decisions, confidence to complete tasks without supervision, the achievement of career goals, perceptual skills, security of records, and longer work hours in the post‐automation period.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 30 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 January 1996

Rebecca Abraham and Anthony Zikiye

Acculturation profiles based on the self‐oriented, others‐oriented, and perceptual dimensions of acculturative adjustment were derived for MNC employees of American…

Abstract

Acculturation profiles based on the self‐oriented, others‐oriented, and perceptual dimensions of acculturative adjustment were derived for MNC employees of American, Canadian, Indian, Japanese, Latin American, Carribean and Nigerian origin. Our finding of significant, target‐specific, intercultural differences is of paramount importance in delineating areas of predeparture expatriate training and development.

Details

Cross Cultural Management: An International Journal, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7606

Article
Publication date: 1 April 1993

Rebecca Zikiye and Anthony Zikiye

Builds a profile of values for a sample of Japanese managers andtheir immediate supervisors, to be used by Western managers engaged inbusiness ventures with Japanese…

Abstract

Builds a profile of values for a sample of Japanese managers and their immediate supervisors, to be used by Western managers engaged in business ventures with Japanese counterparts. An exploratory factor analysis utilizes Maccoby’s head and heart traits to reveal the powerful influence of tradition in the form of Confucianism, Amayakasu, Chun‐Tzu, honesty and mental autarky, with secondary factors of professionalism and inflexibility suggesting convergence with Western beliefs. Although supervisory perceptions conformed closely with those of respondents, cross‐cultural comparisons demonstrated that US and Japanese managers espouse diametrically opposing values.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 31 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 1997

Rebecca Abraham

This study is an empirical investigation of receptivity to expatriate assignment in culturally similar and dissimilar environments. The theoretical underpinnings of the…

Abstract

This study is an empirical investigation of receptivity to expatriate assignment in culturally similar and dissimilar environments. The theoretical underpinnings of the study emerge from a model of the expatriate adjustment process which views the determinants as anticipatory adjustment variables antecedent to actual adjustment. Vertical individualism, career distance and corporate career policy along with role clarity and economic development as moderators were found to significantly explain willingness to relocate to culturally similar environments. Economic development, corporate family policy and career distance were significant predictors of mobility to culturally dissimilar environments. The proposed model for culturally similar environments substantially improves explanatory power over an existing model. Implications of the study in conjunction with predictors from the domestic mobility and international adjustment literature are discussed.

Details

Cross Cultural Management: An International Journal, vol. 4 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7606

Article
Publication date: 1 March 1996

Rebecca Abraham

This study is an extension of an etic‐emic analysis of the individualism‐collectivism construct at the sociopsychological level to an organizational context. At the first…

Abstract

This study is an extension of an etic‐emic analysis of the individualism‐collectivism construct at the sociopsychological level to an organizational context. At the first level of comparison, strong and weak etics were extracted to permit comparability of values. At the second level, emic elements were produced to provide a basis of intercultural comparisons. Purely individualistic, purely collectivist and multidimensional factors emerged for the ten nations under consideration.

Details

Cross Cultural Management: An International Journal, vol. 3 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7606

Article
Publication date: 1 March 1998

Rebecca Abraham

Compares the values underlying the behaviour of a sample of 87 US, 56 Jamaican, 42 Bahamian, 106 Colombian, and 12 Israeli managers and professional staff. Refers to…

1064

Abstract

Compares the values underlying the behaviour of a sample of 87 US, 56 Jamaican, 42 Bahamian, 106 Colombian, and 12 Israeli managers and professional staff. Refers to literature defining individualism and collectivism, uncertainty avoidance, power distance, and masculinity/femininity; as well as literature establishing these values as instrumental or terminal. Hypothesizes that each country‘s respondents will record different instrumental values, with the US respondents being ambitious, independent, intellectual and logical (vertically individualist); the Colombian, Jamaican and Bahamians being ambitious, cheerful, forgiving, helpful, loving, obedient and polite; and the Israelis also valuing the latter six qualities. Describes the methodology used and data analysis. Indicates expected results from the findings, other than the Jamaicans and Bahamians were found to value ambition and independence more highly than hypothesized, and the Israelis valued love and obedience but not cheerfulness and forgiveness. Discusses the implications of the findings in the light of the high failure rate of expatriate assignments.

Details

Cross Cultural Management: An International Journal, vol. 5 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7606

Keywords

1 – 6 of 6