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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2002

Rebecca A. Thacker and Christine A. Yost

Employers often comment on the lack of good team leadership skills exhibited by newly graduated business students. While an understanding of the factors that contribute to…

Abstract

Employers often comment on the lack of good team leadership skills exhibited by newly graduated business students. While an understanding of the factors that contribute to effective communication in workplace teams does exist, are we certain that the factors influencing quality of communication between student team leaders and team members are the same as the factors influencing quality of communication in workplace teams? To investigate this issue, students were surveyed. Results indicate that student team leaders mirror workplace team leaders in all but one important factor: the use of exchange as a tactic of influence. Use of supportive influence tactics and recognition that assertive tactics are not effective was consistent with workplace team leader tactics. As with workplace team leaders, trust was an important determinant with satisfaction with the team leader’s communication. Implications and suggestions for training students to become effective team members in the work world are discussed.

Details

Team Performance Management: An International Journal, vol. 8 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7592

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2002

Rebecca A. Thacker

In an effort to revise an undergraduate human resource management (HRM) curriculum and improve the relevance of the students’ learning, a collaborative effort between…

Abstract

In an effort to revise an undergraduate human resource management (HRM) curriculum and improve the relevance of the students’ learning, a collaborative effort between human resource management practitioners and HRM faculty was launched. The result was the design of a project‐based, action learning curriculum blending the knowledge acquisition that has historically been the outcome of university classroom training with the application that is so critical to effective functioning in the HRM work world. The paper provides guidance for others planning to improve the relevance of their curricula. The template presented in this paper emphasizes practitioner input, a willingness to adopt creative approaches to student learning, development of specific measurable outcomes, observable demonstrations of the learning of those outcomes and the creation of relevant, appropriate projects. Follow‐up comments after one year of experience with the newly revised curriculum are also included.

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Education + Training, vol. 44 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1998

Rebecca A. Thacker

A major premise of this paper is that organizational values are likely to be expressed in the type of influence tactics successful individuals employ. The purpose of this…

Abstract

A major premise of this paper is that organizational values are likely to be expressed in the type of influence tactics successful individuals employ. The purpose of this study is to explore the notion that individuals can gauge their fit with the organization according to their perception of the influence tactics they think are important for success. Specifically, this research is premised upon the assumption that individuals, over time, acquire a sense ofthe influence tactics they believe are important, and gauge their fit with the organization accordingly. This study is longitudinal in nature, and includes a measurement of turnover, permitting further exploration of the individual’s perception of fit with the organization. This study is unique in that no research to date has explored the relationship between turnover and individuals’ perceptions of those tactics they think are important for success.

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American Journal of Business, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1935-5181

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Article
Publication date: 14 March 2008

Rebecca A. Thacker and Kelly B. Holl

The purpose of this paper is to identify behaviorally‐based training for management trainees with a foundation in employees' beliefs about effective managerial behaviors

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify behaviorally‐based training for management trainees with a foundation in employees' beliefs about effective managerial behaviors, and the relationship of these behaviors to employees' satisfaction with supervision, company as employer, and job assignments.

Design/methodology/approach

Manufacturing organization and social services agency employees (N=134) were surveyed by questionnaire and asked “How important do you think it is that managers exhibit the following behaviors?” and “How well does your manager exhibit the following behaviors?” Factor analysis produced three factors: Connection with employees, Vision, Autonomy. Employee satisfaction questions were included.

Findings

Vision and Autonomy scales for “How well does your manager exhibit the following behaviors?” showed significant, positive correlations for satisfaction with quality of supervision, and with company/agency as an employer. Connection with employees scale for “How important do you think it is that managers exhibit the following behaviors?” showed significant, positive correlations for employees' satisfaction with job assignments

Research limitations/implications

Future research should include employees' perceptions of what constitutes effective managerial behaviors. Study should be replicated in larger, multicultural organizations to assess the universality of these managerial behaviors.

Practical implications

Specific recommendations for behaviorally‐based manager training of management trainees, based on employee‐identified behaviors, are provided.

Originality/value

The paper is creative in its inclusion of employees in data collection of definition of effective managerial behaviors and is valuable to those interested in management trainee programs linking behaviorally‐based development to employee satisfaction outcomes.

Details

Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 40 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1997

Rebecca A. Thacker

Shows that the communication style that team and project leaders use to enhance team creativity is of paramount importance in trying to promote creativity in the…

Abstract

Shows that the communication style that team and project leaders use to enhance team creativity is of paramount importance in trying to promote creativity in the workplace. Team leaders need to be trained to exhibit a communication pattern that enhances team creativity, but they should be trained in such a way that team members perceive accurately the message the team leader is portraying. Explains how team leaders can be trained to exhibit a consultative/team‐oriented communication style to enhance team creativity, as opposed to a directive/assertive style, such that team members perceive the team leader’s message accurately. Describes a follow‐up evaluation process, including sample questions for a survey of team members’ perceptions of leader style.

Details

Training for Quality, vol. 5 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-4875

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1995

David B. Reynolds and Brian H. Kleiner

Professor Anita Hill's testimony in October of 1991 at the Senate confirmation hearings for then Supreme Court nominee Clarence Thomas brought more attention to the issue…

Abstract

Professor Anita Hill's testimony in October of 1991 at the Senate confirmation hearings for then Supreme Court nominee Clarence Thomas brought more attention to the issue of sexual harassment than in any other year since the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) published its definitional guidelines in 1980. Recent events such as the Navy's Tailhook incident and current sexual harassment claims filed against several U.S. Congressmen have heightened awareness of the magnitude of the sexual harassment problem.

Details

Equal Opportunities International, vol. 14 no. 6/7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0261-0159

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Article
Publication date: 21 May 2018

Rebecca G.W. Mueller

The College, Career, and Civic Life Framework and recently revised social studies standards in a number of states have placed renewed emphasis on inquiry-based instruction…

Abstract

Purpose

The College, Career, and Civic Life Framework and recently revised social studies standards in a number of states have placed renewed emphasis on inquiry-based instruction rooted in rigorous and relevant questions, which necessitates a better understanding of how teachers develop questions capable of meeting the expectations set forth in these documents. The purpose of this paper is to examine teachers’ question-development processes and the impact of question development and implementation on their understanding of compelling questions.

Design/methodology/approach

This qualitative study examined how six high school civics teachers from a single Kentucky school district defined and developed compelling questions. Following recommendations for in-depth phenomenological interviews, this study implemented a three-interview sequence, each of which included a verbal report component. Additional data were generated through teacher-completed Question Development Tasks and Question Evaluation Tasks.

Findings

The findings suggest that participants’ attempts to craft questions that balanced relevance and complexity led them to engage in a deliberate, reflective question-development process. Teachers’ understandings of compelling questions were shaped by their question-development experience; however, teachers who implemented their compelling questions emerged with a more nuanced understanding of their construction and a deeper commitment to their use.

Originality/value

Although focused on a small group of teachers, this study provides valuable insight into teachers’ conceptions of inquiry, which may strengthen the supports teacher educators and administrators provide to those attempting to implement inquiry in their classrooms.

Details

Social Studies Research and Practice, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1933-5415

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Book part
Publication date: 31 December 2010

Deborah K. King

As the First Lady, Michelle Obama stated that she had a number of priorities but that the first year would be mainly about supporting her two girls in their transitions to…

Abstract

As the First Lady, Michelle Obama stated that she had a number of priorities but that the first year would be mainly about supporting her two girls in their transitions to their new life in the White House. Her choice to be mom-in-chief drew unusually intense and rather puzzling, scrutiny. The chapter briefly discusses the range of reactions along the political spectrum as well as African-American feminists’ analyses of the stereotypes of Black women underlying those reactions. This analysis engages the debates from a different perspective. First, the chapter addresses the under-theorizing of the racialized gender norms embedded in the symbolism of the White House and the role of First Lady. It challenges the presumption of traditional notions of true womanhood and the incorrect conclusion that mothering would preclude public engagement.

Second and most importantly, this chapter argues that there are fundamental misunderstandings of what mothering meant for Michelle Obama as African-American woman. Cultural traditions and socio-historical conditions have led Black women, both relatives and non-kin, to form mothering relationships with others’ children and to appreciate the interdependence of “nurturing” one's own children, other children, and entire communities. Those practitioners whose nurturing activities encompassed commitment and contributions to the collectivity were referred to as community othermothering. Using primary sources, this chapter examines in detail Michelle Obama's socialization for and her practice of community othermothering in her role as First Lady. Attention is focused on her transformation of White House events by extending hospitality to more within Washington, DC, and the nation, plus broadening young people's exposure to inspiration, opportunities, and support for setting and accomplishing their dreams. Similarly, the concept of community othermothering is also used to explain Michelle Obama’s reinterpretation of the traditional First Lady's special project into the ambitious “Let's Move” initiative to end childhood obesity within a generation. The othermothering values and endeavors have helped establish the White House as “the People's House.”

Details

Race in the Age of Obama
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-167-2

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