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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2000

Benjamin Chirgwin

CRE value is created by efficiently aligning business and real estate strategies. The primary responsibility in today’s environment for corporate real estate executives is…

Abstract

CRE value is created by efficiently aligning business and real estate strategies. The primary responsibility in today’s environment for corporate real estate executives is to understand the business that they are in, and to leverage that knowledge to make real estate strategies and decisions that support and enhance the profitability of the company. The first step in this process is gaining business knowledge through aligning real estate and business strategies and goals. This paper looks at one way of establishing an organisation that efficiently captures and utilises business information to develop value‐added real estate strategies.

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Journal of Corporate Real Estate, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-001X

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Article
Publication date: 31 December 2003

Deborah S. Kops

The corporate real estate provider community is freely using the term business process outsourcing, or ‘BPO’ to differentiate its value propositions. Yet most buyers and…

Abstract

The corporate real estate provider community is freely using the term business process outsourcing, or ‘BPO’ to differentiate its value propositions. Yet most buyers and sellers have yet to articulate clearly the concept as it pertains to corporate real estate ‐ the value proposition, economic structure, focus and impediments to adoption. This paper defines BPO as it relates to corporate real estate and suggests conditions that must be in place for its adoption.

Details

Journal of Corporate Real Estate, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-001X

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Article
Publication date: 19 June 2017

Åsa Yderfält and Tommy Roxenhall

This paper aims to analyze how a real estate business model innovation developed in a real estate network, with a special focus on the relationship between ego network…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to analyze how a real estate business model innovation developed in a real estate network, with a special focus on the relationship between ego network structure and the innovative development of the business model.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is a single case study of a Swedish real estate network of 38 actors. The data were collected at the individual actor level using multiple sources: 12 semi-structured in-depth interviews, 94 min of meetings and 28 written contracts. The empirical findings resulted in four propositions.

Findings

This study demonstrates that it was primarily the building user who was behind the innovative development of the real estate business model innovation, whereas the real estate company acted as a network hub and network resource coordinator. The ego network structures significantly affected the outcome.

Practical implications

Real estate companies should act as hubs, coordinating all the network actor resources the building user needs in the value-creation process. To be effective hubs, the representatives of real estate companies must create extensive personal and open ego networks to acquire central network positions.

Originality/value

Few studies examine business model innovation, particularly in the real estate context. Though large real estate businesses usually operate in the networks of various actors, analyses based on the network perspective are also lacking. This case study builds a valuable understanding of how network processes in real estate networks can be used as tools to foster real estate business model innovation, which in turn can lead to more competitive real estate companies and building users.

Details

Management Research Review, vol. 40 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8269

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2000

Index by subjects, compiled by K.G.B. Bakewell covering the following journals: Facilities Volumes 8‐17; Journal of Property Investment & Finance Volumes 8‐17; Property…

Abstract

Index by subjects, compiled by K.G.B. Bakewell covering the following journals: Facilities Volumes 8‐17; Journal of Property Investment & Finance Volumes 8‐17; Property Management Volumes 8‐17; Structural Survey Volumes 8‐17.

Details

Facilities, vol. 18 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-2772

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2000

K.G.B. Bakewell

Compiled by K.G.B. Bakewell covering the following journals published by MCB University Press: Facilities Volumes 8‐17; Journal of Property Investment & Finance Volumes…

Abstract

Compiled by K.G.B. Bakewell covering the following journals published by MCB University Press: Facilities Volumes 8‐17; Journal of Property Investment & Finance Volumes 8‐17; Property Management Volumes 8‐17; Structural Survey Volumes 8‐17.

Details

Property Management, vol. 18 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-7472

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2005

Kiran Naidu, Richard Reed and Chris Heywood

Driven by Western companies' requirements for efficiency and effectiveness, a trend towards outsourcing of business activities to India and other low‐cost countries…

Abstract

Driven by Western companies' requirements for efficiency and effectiveness, a trend towards outsourcing of business activities to India and other low‐cost countries commenced in the early 1990s and has continued to grow at a surprisingly fast pace. In a relatively short timeframe India has become a global hub for back‐office services, although the effect on the urban cities is yet to be fully comprehended. As American and European companies continue to relocate their information technology services and other back office works to the subcontinent, there has been a considerable flow‐on effect on Indian corporate real estate. This paper addresses two key questions. Firstly, the factors important for Western companies' outsourcing of organisational activities to India, and secondly, the effect of business outsourcing on corporate real estate locational requirements in India. A survey of corporate real estate representatives in India and the UK was conducted with the results providing an insight into the present state and possible future direction of outsourcing for India. This research presents a unique insight into the impacts of Western business outsourcing on corporate real estate in India, and presents findings that are useful to both organisations seeking to relocate business activities to India and for property market analysts looking to understand drivers behind this sustained demand for Indian corporate real estate.

Details

Journal of Corporate Real Estate, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-001X

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 2000

K.G.B. Bakewell

Compiled by K.G.B. Bakewell covering the following journals published by MCB University Press: Facilities Volumes 8‐17; Journal of Property Investment & Finance Volumes…

Abstract

Compiled by K.G.B. Bakewell covering the following journals published by MCB University Press: Facilities Volumes 8‐17; Journal of Property Investment & Finance Volumes 8‐17; Property Management Volumes 8‐17; Structural Survey Volumes 8‐17.

Details

Journal of Property Investment & Finance, vol. 18 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-578X

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2008

Kim Hiang Liow and Nappi‐Choulet Ingrid

The purpose of this paper is to discuss three corporate real estate (CRE) perspectives (business, financial and capital market) as well as some potential issues, supported…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to discuss three corporate real estate (CRE) perspectives (business, financial and capital market) as well as some potential issues, supported by key research studies and evidence drawn from listed retail companies in the USA, and European and Asian countries; as real estate has always been recognized as a key value driver in the retail industry.

Design/methodology/approach

A significant amount of capital is locked‐up in CRE by business firms, and so this paper analyzes the role of CRE from a combination of three perspectives: business, financial and capital market. These three CRE perspectives are discussed and some important issues reviewed, supported by key research studies and evidence drawn from listed retail companies in the USA and in European and Asian countries.

Findings

Arising from the review and perspectives offered in this paper, it is evident that performance measures are required to assess how CRE are being used and perceived by management and investors from the business, financial and capital market perspectives. This combined approach helps position the strategic role of the CRE in the context of “whole firm” that reflects the integration of trading and real estate activities.

Practical implications

With an effective CREAM system endorsed by top management, the CRE' s potential contribution and incremental performance can be factored into the financial plans of the “property‐rich” retail firms and appropriately reflected in corporate valuation.

Originality/value

This paper offers combined business, financial and capital market perspectives to assess the role of CRE in listed retail firms. Evidence and important issues in relation to the three perspectives are reviewed and evaluated.

Details

Journal of Corporate Real Estate, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-001X

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2014

Abdul Jalil Omar and Christopher A. Heywood

This paper aims to explore how branding theory can be used to understand corporate real estate management's (CREM's) relationships with its customers. Specifically, the…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore how branding theory can be used to understand corporate real estate management's (CREM's) relationships with its customers. Specifically, the perspectives of CREM executives and customers are used to develop a statement of a CREM brand.

Design/methodology/approach

A multiple case study approach from four industry sections that consist of telecommunications, logistic, retail, and education from an emerging real estate market (Malaysia) and a mature real estate market (Australia). CREM executives and CREM customers from each case were interviewed to obtain information on CREM within organisations.

Findings

The findings indicate that CREM supports the business by managing organisations' strategic real estate resources as its brand. CREM executives focus more on the technicality of real estate functions, while CREM customers expect corporate real estate (CRE) to support their business functions.

Research limitations/implications

A CREM brand is important to CREM relationship building with the targeted customers. Successful brand development is able to increase CREM visibility to customers and at the same time gain appreciation of its contributions to the organisations.

Originality/value

This is the first study that investigates CREM from a branding perspective. The mechanism for communicating CREM contributions using branding helps to increase acceptance from the customers.

Details

Journal of Corporate Real Estate, vol. 16 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-001X

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Article
Publication date: 22 April 2005

Robert N. Lussier

The purpose of this study was to use the Lussier (1995) generic success versus failure (S/F) prediction model to develop a real estate industry specific model (S/F …

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to use the Lussier (1995) generic success versus failure (S/F) prediction model to develop a real estate industry specific model (S/F = f[industry experience, age, advisors, planning, capital]). Using logistic regression analysis, the Lussier model (p = .028) and the real estate agency model (p = .001) are significant predictors of business success and failure. The Lussier model accurately predicted 84 percent of the surveyed successful and failed matched pairs agencies as being successful or failed and the real estate model predicted 74 percent. The Lussier model explained 68 percent of the variance of contributing factors to success versus failure and the real estate model explained 56 percent. Implications are discussed.

Details

American Journal of Business, vol. 20 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1935-5181

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