Search results

1 – 10 of 134
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 8 May 2017

Khalid Al-Amri, Saif Al Shidi, Munther Al Busaidi and Serkan Akguc

The purpose of this paper is to examine the use of real earnings management by private and public firms in a unique institutional setting, which is the Gulf Cooperation…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the use of real earnings management by private and public firms in a unique institutional setting, which is the Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) countries. The paper also compares the level of real earnings management between public and private firms in the GCC area.

Design/methodology/approach

The GCC area is a unique setting to investigate the use of real earnings management because of the low enforcement of reporting standards and supervisory rules, lack of sophisticated financial analysis, specialized media tools and high concentration of capital ownership. The authors use different models of real earnings management proposed by Roychowdhury, 2006, cash flow management, productions cost management and discretionary expenses management to examine the use of real earnings management.

Findings

The paper documents evidence consistent with private and public firms using real earnings management to influence their earnings figures. The paper also shows that the level of real earnings management is higher for private firms compared to public firms when cash flow management and discretionary expenses management models are used. The production cost model results show evidence consistent with public firms only engaging in real earnings management through production cost reduction.

Research limitations/implications

The results of this study might not be applicable to other emerging markets.

Practical implications

The findings of this study should promote a general understanding of firms’ behavior in unique environment such as GCC countries. Regulators in the GCC region should be aware that real earnings management techniques have been used by firms and that extra caution is required when auditing or analyzing the financial information of private and public firms in the GCC market.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to the literature in many aspects. First, it provides additional evidence on the use of earnings management in unique market contexts outside the USA and Europe. The GCC markets share many common characteristics that make them interesting settings to be investigated. Second, this paper adds more evidence on the use of earnings management between public and private firms. In this regard, the paper adds additional evidence in the discussions proposed by Ball and Shivakumar (2005) and Givoly et al. (2010) who use two competing perspectives to investigate earnings quality in public and private firms: the demand hypothesis and the opportunistic behavior hypothesis.

Details

Journal of Applied Accounting Research, vol. 18 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0967-5426

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 9 April 2021

Manish Bansal

Prior studies document that managers engaged in shifting of non-operating revenue to operating revenue (revenue shifting) and shifting of operating expenses to…

Abstract

Purpose

Prior studies document that managers engaged in shifting of non-operating revenue to operating revenue (revenue shifting) and shifting of operating expenses to non-operating expenses (expense shifting (ES)) within income statement to report inflated operating profits of firms. This study aims to identify the factors affecting revenue shifting and ES.

Design/methodology/approach

The operating revenue model (Malikov et al., 2018) and the core earnings expectation model (McVay, 2006) are used for measuring revenue shifting and ES, respectively. The panel data regression models are used to analyze the data for this study.

Findings

The study results show that large and old firms are engaged in revenue shifting, whereas small and young firms prefer ES over revenue shifting for reporting inflated operating profits. These results imply that firms choose the shifting strategy based on relative advantage and ease in execution. The results are robust after controlling for accruals earnings management, real earnings management and endogeneity bias.

Practical implications

It suggests investors minutely investigate the operating performance metrics of initial public offering firms that are relatively small and young while buying their shares. Besides, findings suggest accounting standard setters make more mandatory disclosure requirements for recording expense and revenue items in the income statement to curb this corporate misfeasance of classification shifting.

Originality/value

This is among the earlier attempts to identify firm-specific factors that incentivize firms to prefer one form of shifting over another. Second, the study jointly examines both forms of shifting by taking a uniform sample of firms over the same period. Most of the prior studies have examined one form at a time.

Details

Journal of Financial Reporting and Accounting, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1985-2517

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 25 July 2019

Perry Warjiyo and Solikin M. Juhro

Abstract

Details

Central Bank Policy: Theory and Practice
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-751-6

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 7 May 2021

Manish Bansal, Ashish Kumar and K. N. Badhani

The authors aim at investigating different forms of classification shifting (CS). CS is a novel form of earnings management under which managers misclassify income…

Abstract

Purpose

The authors aim at investigating different forms of classification shifting (CS). CS is a novel form of earnings management under which managers misclassify income statement line items and cash flow statement line items with an intent to report favorable operating performance of firms. In particular, the authors check the existence of revenue misclassification, expense misclassification and cash flows misclassification among Indian firms by taking the uniform sample of firms over a single period.

Design/methodology/approach

Operating revenue model (Malikov et al., 2018), core earnings expectation model (McVay, 2006) and operating cash flows model (Roychowdhury, 2006) are employed for measuring revenue misclassification, expense misclassification and cash flows misclassification, respectively. The panel data regression models are used to analyze the data for this study.

Findings

Based on the sample of 12,870 Bombay Stock Exchange (BSE) listed firm-years observations between 2010 and 2018, we find that, on average, Indian firms are engaged in revenue misclassification rather than expense misclassification to report inflated core earnings. Firms are found to be engaged in cash flows misclassification too. Besides, we find that magnitude of shifting is greater among larger firms. Results also establish that adoption of Ind AS increases the scope of shifting practices. These results are based on several robustness checks.

Practical implications

The results suggest that investors conduct a comprehensive review of the items of financial statements before using them in their portfolio valuation. It suggests auditors check the basis of revenue classification and standard-setting authorities, like ICAI in India, to make more mandatory disclosure requirements for classification of revenues and cash flows. It suggests lenders not to make lending decisions by looking at the operating performance metrics, as CS is the most preferred tool to positively influence the perception of lenders toward operating performance.

Originality/value

It is the first study that investigates different forms of classification shifting jointly for a sample of firms. Most of the earlier studies have examined one kind of classification shifting at a time. This study adds to the existing literature on earnings management by documenting that some firm-specific factors pressurize firms to prefer one form of shifting over another to report inflated core earnings.

Details

Managerial Finance, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4358

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 2 November 2015

Paul Donovan

– The purpose of this study is to compare learner experiences of recorded instructional videos (DVDs) with Machinima.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to compare learner experiences of recorded instructional videos (DVDs) with Machinima.

Design/methodology/approach

In this exploratory study, sets of learning sequences in management skills training were delivered to 32 learners using both methods, and learner reactions were gathered using post-event interviews.

Findings

Analysis of learner responses showed that participants prefer Machinima as a learning delivery mechanism. Participants also reported being better able to concentrate on the message of the Machinima learning sequences.

Research limitations/implications

The sample was not representative, being a convenience sample derived by open invitation from cohorts of two master’s degree programmes conducted at the School of Business, Maynooth University, Maynooth, Co. Kildare. The age range of the participants was significantly skewed toward a younger age grouping. No learning test was given to assess the teaching efficacy of the methods. Implications for practice include using Machinima to model desirable behaviours to trainees. Future research should extend the research to other settings.

Practical implications

Research should be considered into the potential for Machinima to be considered as a replacement for DVD in management training. Sufficient encouragement arises from this study to suggest that Machinima contains none of the distractions of DVD that are recorded in this study. In addition, many organisations seek to utilise training materials with diverse audiences.

Originality/value

Originality of the study stems from the potential replacement of DVD with Machinima in learning.

Details

European Journal of Training and Development, vol. 39 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-9012

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 June 2001

Brett A.S. Martin and Celeste A. McCracken

Attempts to investigate differences in marketing imagery that exist between New Zealand produced and foreign music videos. Explores marketing imagery and role‐model…

Abstract

Attempts to investigate differences in marketing imagery that exist between New Zealand produced and foreign music videos. Explores marketing imagery and role‐model behaviour differences by genre. Looks at culture by genre differences in consumption imagery. Indicates that New Zealand videos contained fewer depictions of alcohol, or weapons, drugs and tobacco or heavy rock and rap music than in foreign videos. Suggests that, by genre, rap has more sunglasses, earrings and jewellery than heavy rock or pop music. Provides directions for future research.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 5 September 2016

This paper aims to review the latest management developments across the globe and pinpoint practical implications from cutting-edge research and case studies.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to review the latest management developments across the globe and pinpoint practical implications from cutting-edge research and case studies.

Design/methodology/approach

This briefing is prepared by an independent writer who adds their own impartial comments and places the articles in context.

Findings

Compares learner experiences of recorded instructional videos (DVDs) with Machinima, digital films made in virtual worlds. Analysis of learner responses showed that participants prefer Machinima as a learning delivery mechanism. Participants also reported being better able to concentrate on the message because there were fewer distractions such as the appearance, dress and mannerisms of real actors.

Practical implications

The paper provides strategic insights and practical thinking that have influenced some of the world’s leading organizations.

Originality/value

The briefing saves busy executives and researchers hours of reading time by selecting only the very best, most pertinent information and presenting it in a condensed and easy-to-digest format.

Details

Development and Learning in Organizations: An International Journal, vol. 30 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7282

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 May 1986

The big changes over recent years and their rapid development in Food Retailing have resulted in different shopping practices, for the institution, the hotel, restaurant…

Abstract

The big changes over recent years and their rapid development in Food Retailing have resulted in different shopping practices, for the institution, the hotel, restaurant and the home. Different cuisines have developed, foods purchased, both in cooking practices and eating habits, especially in the home. Gone are the old fashioned home economics, taking with them out of the diet much that was enjoyed and from which the families benefitted in health and stomach satisfaction. In very recent times, the changes have become bigger, developments more rapid, and the progress continues. Bigger and bigger stores, highly departmentalised, mechanical aids of every description, all under one roof, “complex” is an appropriate term for it; large open spaces for the housewife with a car. The development is in fact aimed at the bulk buyer — rapid turnover — the small household needs, not entirely neglected, but not specially catered for. Daily cash takings are collosal. This is what the small owner‐occupied general store, with its many domestic advantages, has come to fall in the late twentieth century.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 88 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 18 November 2015

Adrienne R. Lotson

This paper, an exploration into Black women cultural consumers of Tyler Perry Productions, examines the ways cultural consumption practices contribute to transformative…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper, an exploration into Black women cultural consumers of Tyler Perry Productions, examines the ways cultural consumption practices contribute to transformative ideologies and behaviors.

Methodology/approach

This regionally diverse ethnography using yo-yo fieldwork in Los Angeles, Atlanta, New York, and New Orleans, is based upon the author’s experiences over the course of five years engaging theater attendees and the casts and crew members of multiple Perry productions.

Findings

The author first discusses the dichotomous and provocative responses to Perry’s work by scholars, critics, and consumers of Tyler Perry Productions. After an ethnographically rich discussion of the setting surrounding a performance of the stage play Madea’s Big Happy Family, the author discusses how Black women report Perry’s work as a site of resistance to, and resources for responding to, microaggressions and other structures of oppression.

Originality/value

Building on the work of black feminist theory (Bobo, 2001, B. Smith, 1998) and black feminist theater aesthetic (Anderson, 2008), this paper, by crafting a Black Women’s Theatre Aesthetic that, for the first time, engages with and gives primacy to the consumers of theatrical productions, opens a portal for understanding the creative ways Black women call into play cultural consumption practices as tools and devices for transformative praxis.

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 May 1992

Christine Wieneke

In 1990, an academic colleague and I received a small grant to undertake a research project1 relating to the practice of equal opportunity in higher education institutions…

Abstract

In 1990, an academic colleague and I received a small grant to undertake a research project1 relating to the practice of equal opportunity in higher education institutions in one Australian state: New South Wales. We set out to examine Equal Employment Opportunity Coordinators‘ (EEOCs’) perceptions of the effectiveness of EEO and affirmative action in universities and colleges, but we also wanted to document the experiences of these specialist staff in undertaking the difficult job of assisting their organisation to implement strategies to achieve equal opportunity in employment. This paper selects aspects of data contained in interviews with EEOCs which relates specifically to their personal experiences in undertaking EEO work. Although those employed in this field are called by various titles ‐ EEO Officer, EEO Coordinator, Equal Opportunity Coordinator ‐ for the purpose of this paper, and to avoid identification, all staff have been called EEO Coordinators (EEOCs).

Details

Equal Opportunities International, vol. 11 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0261-0159

1 – 10 of 134