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Article
Publication date: 11 January 2011

Peng Kao and Kuan‐nien Chen

The purpose of this paper is to present the experience of National Taiwan University Medical Library (NTUML) in changing the atmosphere of the library, catering to the…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present the experience of National Taiwan University Medical Library (NTUML) in changing the atmosphere of the library, catering to the needs of current users; attracting potential users to the library; and modifying the library's image from a place filled with stacks of books and clusters of computers to a place where people might relax and enjoy reading.

Design/methodology/approach

NTUML commenced the planning stage of the renovation of its Reference Room on the third floor in June 2007. After extensive discussions with the interior designer, the NTUML transformed an abstract idea into the concrete design of the “New Reading Paradise”, a diverse and cozy environment suitable for quiet reading, group discussion and interaction. The “New Reading Paradise” was officially open to public in March 2008. The 992‐square‐meter reading paradise houses a choice collection of books and reference materials, with comfortable, brightly‐lit discussion rooms and ergonomically designed reading tables and chairs.

Findings

Records show that from 2005 to 2008 the number of readers using the NTUML Reference Room increased by 52.60 percent. The NTUML conducted a small questionnaire survey of a random sample of its users. Of the 40 respondents, 35 were satisfied with the overall design of the space, and the remaining five thought it was acceptable. A total 37 respondents said that they were more inclined to use the library because of the “New Reading Paradise”.

Originality/value

The paper describes how the library transformed itself to become more in tune with the needs of its users. The Reading Paradise reminds the users to slow down, take a mind break, and enjoy reading and thinking. This is a responsibility of the library.

Details

New Library World, vol. 112 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Article
Publication date: 6 May 2014

Charlie Smith

– This paper aims to contribute to discussion about the changing role of libraries and their collections, through discussing projects designed by architecture students.

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1718

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to contribute to discussion about the changing role of libraries and their collections, through discussing projects designed by architecture students.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper reflects on design projects produced by final-year students studying for an undergraduate degree in architecture. A project was set for a group of students to design a “Book Repository”. Each researched their own interpretation of what this might be, given contemporary issues such as increasing digitisation, falling numbers of library visitors, changing users’ needs and what they interpret as a future for books. This paper reviews a selection of the projects in the context of contemporary research, and discusses the book as a physical object, contemporary library design and the role of libraries as civic buildings.

Findings

Despite being designed by digitally literate students, physical books are highly significant in every project; however, the cultural significance of the books is more important than the objects themselves. Also, the provision of spaces for the act of reading is notably absent. The relationship between the library and its context was a key theme for several projects, which explore innovative means through which to engage the public.

Originality/value

Collectively these projects contribute to debate over the role of books and libraries in contemporary culture through the eyes of young designers. The paper will be of interest to those involved in the procurement and design of libraries.

Details

New Library World, vol. 115 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Article
Publication date: 15 October 2020

Keren Dali, Clarissa Vannier and Lindsay Douglass

Addressed to the audience of LIS educators at all levels, from full-time and adjunct faculty teaching in LIS programs, to librarians and library consultants delivering…

Abstract

Purpose

Addressed to the audience of LIS educators at all levels, from full-time and adjunct faculty teaching in LIS programs, to librarians and library consultants delivering professional development training, to practitioners who work with readers in all types of libraries, this article makes a case for replacing the term “readers' advisory” with the term “Reading Experience (RE) librarianship” as a designator of the current professional practice.

Design/methodology/approach

Using historical and discursive analysis based on the extensive literature review, this article argues that a number of factors call for the change in terminology: changes in the human factor (i.e., changes in readers and reading behavior; and changes in relationships between readers and librarians) and changes in the library environment (the rise of “experience” in libraries; a greater commitment to outreach and community engagement; and the fact that librarians are already practicing RE librarianship without recognizing it as such). It also examines the role of LIS educators in fostering and supporting RE librarianship.

Findings

On the one hand, the new terminology will be more reflective of the work that reader service librarians currently do, thus doing justice to a wide range of activities and expanded roles of librarians; on the other hand, it will serve as an imperative and a motivator to further transform reader services from in-house interactions with and programs for avid readers into a true community engagement, with much broader goals, scope and reach.

Originality/value

The article stands to coin a new professional term for the transformed library practice, thus recording a radical change in longstanding professional activities and encouraging new community-oriented thinking about the expanded role of librarians in promoting reading in diverse social environments.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 77 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

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Article
Publication date: 3 April 2017

Sheshagiri Kulkarni, M. Dhanamjaya and B. Preedip Balaji

The purpose of this paper is to study the relationship between public libraries, literature festivals (litfests) and reading habits in Chennai and Bangalore to understand…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to study the relationship between public libraries, literature festivals (litfests) and reading habits in Chennai and Bangalore to understand publishing, reading and the role of public libraries to improve reading and learning among public.

Design/methodology/approach

A field visit to select book fairs and litfests in Chennai and Bangalore was undertaken in 2015 and 2016 to collect data. A predesigned questionnaire was used for data collection at the festivals to establish the correlation among the libraries, bookshops, book fairs and litfests. A sample of n = 445 responses were received.

Findings

The findings suggest that 47 per cent of the respondents do not have any kind of library membership, and most (n = 154) of the respondents say they own an electronic device for reading. In total, 25 per cent say reading books is one of the top leisure activities, and distance (31.7 per cent) hinders people from visiting libraries for reading. Eighty per cent agree that visiting litfests influences and improves reading habits. Further, 48.4 per cent read books several times a week, and 46.7 per cent read 5-20 books in any given year. In total, 84 per cent agree that there is a significant link between a family’s reading habits and a child’s future attitude toward reading. Also, 74 per cent agree that people who buy books from bookshops also borrow books from libraries and vice versa and endorse the fact that there is a strong relationship between book buyers and library visitors.

Social implications

Litfests are booming to promote literature in India. There is a lot to be done to promote public libraries as a public good for people in India as a third space for reading, inclusion and diversity. Innovations in social media and networks, information and communication technologies and internet give an opportunity to the library sector to tap the litfest phenomenon to celebrate reading to reach a large section of the society.

Originality/value

This is a unique exploration to connect the stakeholders – policy makers, publishers and libraries – associated with reading, as studies of this nature are rarely reported in India, when print and digital publishing is flourishing.

Details

Library Hi Tech News, vol. 34 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0741-9058

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Book part
Publication date: 24 November 2010

Peter A. Gisolfi

Early on, public libraries in America tended toward grand appearances befitting seriousness of purpose. Library design changed gradually through the 20th century and more…

Abstract

Early on, public libraries in America tended toward grand appearances befitting seriousness of purpose. Library design changed gradually through the 20th century and more dramatically with automation and new technology. Today's libraries are becoming lively community cultural centers that may include art galleries, flexible auditoriums, meeting and conference rooms, media lounges, and cafés.

This chapter discusses changes in public library design. It focuses on four recent examples – two traditional libraries and two innovative libraries. The changing requirements present significant challenges for library administrators and for the architects who must design the libraries to be organized and used appropriately, now and in the future.

Details

Advances in Library Administration and Organization
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-287-7

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1970

THE process of setting up the new Polytechnics initiated by the White Paper of May, 1966 entitled “A Plan for Polytechnics and other Colleges” is now approaching…

Abstract

THE process of setting up the new Polytechnics initiated by the White Paper of May, 1966 entitled “A Plan for Polytechnics and other Colleges” is now approaching completion. Of the 30 Polytechnics proposed 14 have now been established and practically all the others should be in operation by next September. All of them embrace one or more Colleges of Technology. Colleges of Art, Building and Commerce are also involved and, in two cases, Colleges of Education.

Details

New Library World, vol. 71 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1995

Stephen G. Margeton

Reviews some of the critical issues to consider when designing anacademic law library in the United States from the programming phase tofurniture design. Describes how the…

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1086

Abstract

Reviews some of the critical issues to consider when designing an academic law library in the United States from the programming phase to furniture design. Describes how the Judge Kathryn J. DuFour Law Library was conceived as the largest segment of the new Catholic University of American law building. Discusses methods of forecasting space requirements. Focuses on important issues for consideration in modern law libraries such as proper lighting, sufficient power and requirements for electronic data in offices and at reading room carrels. Highlights how law libraries use computer laboratories. Describes key features of the library plan and how good architecture and furniture craftsmanship can marry traditional style with technology. Concludes with student and staff reactions.

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Article
Publication date: 6 March 2017

Arnold Mwanzu and Dickens Rodrigues Wendo

This paper aims to examine the strides taken by academic libraries in Kenya to match the standards of modern library buildings while highlighting ensuing impact on user…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the strides taken by academic libraries in Kenya to match the standards of modern library buildings while highlighting ensuing impact on user satisfaction. It will give an insight and provide a comprehensive comparison between Kenyan modern libraries and other modern libraries in the world which are considered best library designs, to show progressive development of library design and equipment.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper takes a viewpoint approach after studying the history and development of the current library buildings in Kenya. This paper will answer the following questions: How far are Kenyan university libraries in embracing open space and aesthetic reflections? What is the impact of artistic modern library designs to user satisfaction? What are the effects of colorful interior design and décor on libraries? In addressing these and other related questions, the design of new academic libraries in Kenya over the past eight years is traced.

Findings

Libraries in Kenya and other developing countries have stayed in the right path of revolution by adopting the modern library designs and giving library users more reasons to cherish their libraries as not only reading facilities but also destinations for relaxation, discussions and hangouts. The United States International University (USIU) Library has been touted as the pioneer modern library building, and its standards have been replicated and bettered by other libraries in Kenya today. This is a big stride for Kenyan libraries in the wake of dynamism in libraries.

Originality/value

The value of the paper is that it gives an insight on the development of library buildings in Kenya, providing a comprehensive comparison between Kenyan modern libraries and other modern libraries in the world which are considered best library designs, thereby showing progressive development of library design and equipment.

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Article
Publication date: 12 October 2015

Keren Dali

The purpose of this paper is to examine the reasons for the gradual extinction of reading scholarship in Library and Information Science (LIS) departments and to identify…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the reasons for the gradual extinction of reading scholarship in Library and Information Science (LIS) departments and to identify three problematic areas accounting for its dropping prestige: paradigmatic conflicts, the influence of the corporate university and low awareness of the potential of reading research. It also proposes possible solutions to each problem.

Design/methodology/approach

Close reading and analysis of an extensive selection of sources with novel conceptualization and critical perspectives.

Findings

The information science paradigm, which has dominated LIS, is not sufficient to accommodate reading research. The information science model has a detrimentally restrictive effect on reading scholarship. Library science, which should be considered an autonomous discipline rather than an appendix of information science, is more conducive to the study of reading. Non-specialization-based academic hiring to increase values-based diversity in LIS through a larger influx of reading scholars is advocated.

Originality/value

Reading scholarship, unduly deemed “old-fashioned”, or euphemistically “traditional”, is one of the most potent areas of academic inquiry, to which LIS scholars are perfectly positioned to make a unique contribution. Reading research in LIS has great merit irrespective of its connection to information and technology; a set of evaluative questions to determine the quality of reading scholarship is introduced. Using a case study, the paper illustrates the potential of reading research for interdisciplinary connections, community partnerships and the enrichment of LIS education and professional practices. An honest look at one of the most exciting academic fields, regrettably neglected by LIS.

Details

New Library World, vol. 116 no. 9/10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Book part
Publication date: 15 December 2016

Rachel Wexelbaum

The author of this chapter will explain how libraries define safe space through policies, procedures, and professional codes of ethics. The chapter will generate a history…

Abstract

Purpose

The author of this chapter will explain how libraries define safe space through policies, procedures, and professional codes of ethics. The chapter will generate a history of the concept of libraries as safe space, will explain how libraries attempt to create safe spaces in physical and online environments, and will show how library practices both help and harm patrons in need of safe space.

Methodology/approach

This chapter provides a review of the literature that illustrates how libraries provide safe space – or not – for their patrons. The author will deconstruct the ALA Code of Ethics and Bill of Rights to demonstrate how libraries remain heteronormative institutions that do not recognize the existence of diverse patrons or employees, and how this phenomenon manifests in libraries.

Findings

Libraries, either through their physical construction or through policies and procedures, have become spaces for illegal activities and discrimination. Populations who would be most likely to use libraries often report barriers to access.

Practical implications

Libraries should revisit their policies and procedures, as well as assess their physical and online spaces, to determine whether or not they truly provide safe space for their patrons. While libraries can become safer spaces, they should clearly communicate what types of safety they actually provide.

Originality/value

This chapter offers a critique of libraries as safe spaces, which will challenge popular opinions of libraries, and compel the profession to improve.

Details

The Future of Library Space
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-270-5

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