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Article
Publication date: 5 September 2016

Rea Prouska, Alexandros G. Psychogios and Yllka Rexhepi

The purpose of this paper is to explore the application of total reward practices in small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) in the South-Eastern European (SEE) region…

3981

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the application of total reward practices in small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) in the South-Eastern European (SEE) region and the reward elements positively affecting organisational performance.

Design/methodology/approach

The sample consists of 199 SMEs operating in SEE countries which are either under economic crisis or transition: Greece, Bulgaria, Romania, Albania, Kosovo and the Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia.

Findings

SMEs in the SEE region are implementing a total rewards model which is characterised by a weaker application of individual aspects and by a stronger application of transactional, relational and communal aspects. Within the communal aspects of the model, the study found three elements of the work environment that positively affect organisational performance; work-life balance, employee involvement voice mechanisms, and organisational culture supporting personal and professional development.

Practical implications

The study contributes to HR practice; the authors found that a better work environment is positively related to improved organisational performance in these SMEs. This means that in times of economic crisis or transition when HR budgets are limited such non-financial strategies can be a viable alternative to costly financial rewards to such organisations.

Originality/value

The study contributes to both theory and HR practice by shedding light on how employee rewards are affected in economies under crisis and transition, how SMEs can motivate their employees when faced with significant financial limitations, as well as explores which reward elements can lead to enhanced organisational performance in such organisations.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 45 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 March 2017

Yehuda Baruch, Rea Prouska, Ariane Ollier-Malaterre and Jennifer Bunk

The purpose of this paper is to explore the use and misuse of swearing in the workplace.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the use and misuse of swearing in the workplace.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a qualitative methodology, the authors interviewed 52 lawyers, medical doctors and business executives in the UK, France and the USA.

Findings

In contrast to much of the incivility and social norms literatures, the authors find that male and female business executives, lawyers and doctors of all ages admit to swearing. Further, swearing can lead to positive outcomes at the individual, interpersonal and group levels, including stress-relief, communication-enrichment and socialization-enhancement.

Research limitations/implications

An implication for future scholarship is that “thinking out of the box” when exploring emotion-related issues can lead to new insights.

Practical implications

Practical implications include reconsidering and tolerating incivility under certain conditions.

Originality/value

The authors identified a case in which a negative phenomenon reveals counter-intuitive yet insightful results.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 32 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 July 2015

Uracha Chatrakul Na Ayudhya, Rea Prouska and Suzan Lewis

– Advances the view that work-life balance (WLB) can benefit business during financial crisis and austerity.

2193

Abstract

Purpose

Advances the view that work-life balance (WLB) can benefit business during financial crisis and austerity.

Design/methodology/approach

Draws evidence from studies in Britain and southeastern Europe.

Findings

Introduces and explains the dual-agenda approach as a potential framework for human resources (HR) specialists, managers and employers.

Practical implications

Argues that part of the main challenge for HR is to convince senior and line management of the need for flexible working arrangements. In order to do this, HR should take charge in monitoring the effectiveness of policies, including implementation and take-up rates and especially in evaluating flexible working practices that are often developed from the bottom up.

Social implications

Describes how HR’s role in developing strategies for overcoming resistance to change among managers and others is important, and outlines such barriers to success as gendered assumptions about ideal workers who do not need time for family.

Originality/value

Argues that while WLB initiatives can be good for business and a good way of managing recession and austerity, it is crucial not to lose sight of employee needs.

Details

Human Resource Management International Digest, vol. 23 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0967-0734

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 4 April 2016

Alexandros Psychogios, Leslie Thomas Szamosi, Rea Prouska and Christopher Brewster

The purpose of this paper is to study particular structural and organisational factors affecting the formality of human resource management (HRM) practices in small and…

1759

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to study particular structural and organisational factors affecting the formality of human resource management (HRM) practices in small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) in South-Eastern European (SEE) post-communist countries, in particular Serbia, Romania, Bulgaria and the Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia in order to understand the antecedents of formalization in such settings.

Design/methodology/approach

Adopting a quantitative approach, this study analyses data gathered through a survey of 168 managers of SMEs from throughout the region.

Findings

The results show that HRM in SMEs in the SEE region can be understood through a threefold framework which includes: degree of internationalisation of SMEs, sector of SMEs and organisational size of SMEs. These three factors positively affect the level of HRM formalisation in SEE SMEs. These findings are further attributed to the particular political and economic context of the post-communist SEE region.

Research limitations/implications

Although specific criteria were set for SME selection, the authors do not suggest that the study reflects a representative picture of the SEE region because the authors used a purposive sampling methodology.

Practical implications

This paper provides useful insights into the factors which influence HRM in SMEs in a particular context. The findings can help business owners and managers understand how HRM can be applied in smaller organisations, particularly in post-communist SEE business contexts.

Originality/value

HRM in SMEs in this region has hardly been studied at all despite their importance. Therefore, this exploratory research seeks to expand knowledge relating to the application of HRM in SMEs in SEE countries which have their business environments dominated by different dynamics in comparison to Western European ones.

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