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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1997

Gary Craig and Jill Manthorpe

Local government re‐organisation was promoted on the twin premises that it would reduce costs and promote local identity. The current round of re‐organisation, leading to…

Abstract

Local government re‐organisation was promoted on the twin premises that it would reduce costs and promote local identity. The current round of re‐organisation, leading to the creation of 46 English unitary authorities, has thrown up other policy objectives, such as the potential for increased interdepartmental and agency co‐operation. This Case Study reports on the background to the re‐organisation and locates arguments specific to social services among the claims for the benefits of local government change. Using preliminary data from research in authorities currently undergoing re‐organisation, it identifies finance as a key concern and the impact financial pressure appears to behaving on community care delivery and strategy. It then focuses on the uncertainty and stress for staff and instability of relationships. Finally, it draws attention to changes in philosophy that might be thrown into relief by the new structures and ways of working. The Case Study concludes that the initial impact of re‐organisation is stressful at many levels and that it will be important to gauge long‐term effects.

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Journal of Integrated Care, vol. 5 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1476-9018

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1991

J.R. Carby‐Hall

In a previous monograph a discussion took place on stages one and part of stage two of the three stage process in an unfair dismissal action, namely the employee having to…

Abstract

In a previous monograph a discussion took place on stages one and part of stage two of the three stage process in an unfair dismissal action, namely the employee having to show that he has been dismissed (stage one), and some of the reasons for dismissal which fall within the statutory categories, namely the employee's capability and qualifications; misconduct and redundancy (part of stage two). In this monograph an analysis is proposed on the two remaining reasons, these being the contravention of a duty imposed by an enactment and some other substantial reason. There will then follow a discussion on the test of fairness as constituting the third of the three stage process and on the remedies available when the tribunal finds that the employee has been unfairly dismissed.

Details

Managerial Law, vol. 33 no. 1/2/3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0558

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Article
Publication date: 28 January 2014

Meril Ümarik, Krista Loogma and Külliki Tafel-Viia

The purpose of this paper is to conceptualize the implementation of educational reform processes by applying the concept of social innovation. The paper proposes a model…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to conceptualize the implementation of educational reform processes by applying the concept of social innovation. The paper proposes a model of social innovation and test its applicability in the context of Estonian vocational education reform using two case studies of the school re-organization as an example.

Design/methodology/approach

A case study approach has been applied in the empirical study. Different data collection methods have been used including semi-structured interviews with the various change actors, observations and analysis of written documents.

Findings

The integrated model of social innovation proved to be a fruitful analytical tool. By focusing on five central aspects – the trigger of change, central change agents, social mechanisms facilitating the adoption of change, implications and social gains – it was possible to explain two school re-organization processes and the reasons behind their success or complications.

Practical implications

The analysis of the cases outlined some lessons that can be learned for the future planning and implementation of school reforms. School changes are more easily adopted if actors experience it as useful and rational, school staff are involved in the process as early as possible and the adoption is facilitated by building certain social mechanisms and network structures into the policy implementation process.

Originality/value

The paper makes a contribution to the literature on educational reform by applying the concept of social innovation. Up until now, the concept of social innovation has remained rather underused to explain the process of implementing and adopting reforms, and in particular, it is rarely used in the context of analyzing educational reforms.

Details

Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 52 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 2001

Katherine Tyler and Edmund Stanley

Banks’ structural re‐organisation with centralised units for increased efficiency, technological advances, product diversification, and strategic initiatives to provide…

Abstract

Banks’ structural re‐organisation with centralised units for increased efficiency, technological advances, product diversification, and strategic initiatives to provide multiple products through “deep” multi‐channel access, have challenged the relationship banking model at the heart of bank‐company interaction. Paradox‐ically, while improving the quality of transactional service, the “deep” relationship interface has under‐mined the relationship manager role and caused confusion and antagonism among customers. The negative result is that customers have a more aggressive, trans‐actional approach to purchasing decisions. The banks need to compromise between trans‐actional and relational effort, and the “deep” multi‐channel service delivery interface must have a re‐invigorated relationship manager if banks are to retain their competitive advantage.

Details

International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. 19 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1998

Richard Varey and Steve McGilvray

Offers an account of communication improvement in a UK public service organisation, as part of a strategic review and re‐organisation for improved service delivery, and…

Abstract

Offers an account of communication improvement in a UK public service organisation, as part of a strategic review and re‐organisation for improved service delivery, and, with communication identified as a strategic issue during a corporate strategy development exercise, shows how a task force was initiated to drive forward some essential improvements. Discusses ways of managing the inherited approach and the development of a more responsive approach, and details an internal market orientation model which was developed and piloted. Lists benefits secured from the application of the model during a period of strategic change and describes further developments, including the implementation of standards of communication and board briefing systems. Compares the traditional employee communication and internal market orientation approaches.

Details

Corporate Communications: An International Journal, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1356-3289

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1974

The large, all‐purpose local authorities established by the Local Government Re‐organization Act, 1972, for England and Wales—Scottish local government re‐organization is…

Abstract

The large, all‐purpose local authorities established by the Local Government Re‐organization Act, 1972, for England and Wales—Scottish local government re‐organization is yet to be completed—are operative; members have long since been elected and organization and staffing, if not complete, at least ready to commence. It is certainly the greatest upheaval since urban and rural sanitary authorities were set up about the middle of the last century. The last change of any magnitude was in 1934; small, however, compared with 1974. At that time, there were 62 county councils, 83 county boroughs and nearly 300 municipal boroughs, 29 metropolitan boroughs, more than 600 urban and about 500 rural districts; roughly 1,600 local authorities. The tremendous reduction in authorities by the present re‐organization illustrates the extent of the upheaval.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 76 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Book part
Publication date: 10 November 2005

Manolis Tsiknakis, Angelina Kouroubali, Dimitris Vourvahakis and Stelios C. Orphanoudakis

The rising of chronic illness and the continuous aging of the global population requires a re-organization of health care systems based on relations and exchange of…

Abstract

The rising of chronic illness and the continuous aging of the global population requires a re-organization of health care systems based on relations and exchange of information to address patient needs in the community. The re-organization of health care systems involves interconnected changes and the development of integrated health care information systems and novel eHealth services. In Crete, the Foundation for Research and Technology-Hellas has developed HYGEIAnet, a Regional Health Information Network (RHIN) to contribute to the re-organization of health care systems and information sharing. We present HYGEIAnet, some of the most critical and novel eHealth services developed and deployed, discuss the impact of an RHIN on health care processes, and explore innovative models and services for health delivery and the coordination of care. We then critically discuss lessons learned regarding the effective management of change to overcome organizational and cultural issues in such large-scale initiatives. The paper concludes with policy and practice recommendations for managing change processes in health care organizations.

Details

International Health Care Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-228-3

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1988

Jo Carby‐Hall

The original legislation which introduced the redundancy payments scheme was the Redundancy Payments Act 1965. This was the first of the substantive statutory individual…

Abstract

The original legislation which introduced the redundancy payments scheme was the Redundancy Payments Act 1965. This was the first of the substantive statutory individual employment rights given to an employee; other individual employment rights, as for example, the right not to be unfairly dismissed, followed some years later. The Redundancy Payments Act 1965 has been repealed and the provisions on redundancy are now to be found in the Employment Protection (Consolidation) Act 1978.

Details

Managerial Law, vol. 30 no. 2/3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0558

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Article
Publication date: 4 February 2010

Ray Jones

It is a longstanding commitment of government in the UK that health and social care services be brought together despite the separate legislative and organisational…

Abstract

It is a longstanding commitment of government in the UK that health and social care services be brought together despite the separate legislative and organisational arrangements which were put in place in the 1940s when the welfare state was established. However, frequent government‐generated re‐organisations have disrupted the building of shared health and social care agendas and services. With the General Election in 2010, and a new or revitalised government to be elected, more change is likely. However, there may now be opportunities to concentrate on creating shared health and social care provider organisations and local government leadership of the public health agenda, alongside local council areas as the building blocks for the commissioning of health and social care services.

Details

Journal of Integrated Care, vol. 18 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1476-9018

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Article
Publication date: 8 November 2011

Gary Getz and Joe Lee

A key cause for missing strategy goals is that leaders do not invest the same amount of time, energy, and resources in managing the implementation of the strategy as they…

Abstract

Purpose

A key cause for missing strategy goals is that leaders do not invest the same amount of time, energy, and resources in managing the implementation of the strategy as they do in setting the strategy. They also do not realize that managing strategy execution requires well orchestrated management processes – letting existing business processes run the course will not drive the transformation required. So, in order for companies and business units to reach the audacious ambitions stated in their strategies, they must thoughtfully manage the way the strategy is implemented.

Design/methodology/approach

Our experience transforming Global 1000 companies for over 20 years has shown the “Three pillars of effective strategy execution” methodology to be powerful yet flexible in helping companies to deliver on strategy execution.

Findings

The three pillar approach addresses the direction, structure, and people required to be effective in strategy implementation over the planning horizon. It keeps companies from falling into the trap of emphasizing only one pillar or sub‐element (e.g. structural re‐organization, detailed interpretation of the strategy content, or employee communications) while neglecting others, and allows for ongoing adaptation and re‐balancing of the three pillars as they learn.

Practical implications

Managers should develop implementation plans that specifically address the following issues to execute their strategy effectively: direction – getting specific with strategy to the point where it is relevant for everyone and everything in the company; structure – creating an organizational architecture that shadows the strategic architecture; people – engaging and mobilizing employees for sustained commitment.

Originality/value

Managers must manage their progress on the three pillars in a coordinated way, ensuring that no one element gets too far ahead of the others. Many companies have failed by letting re‐organization get out in front of cascading the content of the strategy, for instance. Balance is a great virtue in implementing the three‐pillar model.

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