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Book part
Publication date: 10 December 2018

Philip Miles

Abstract

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Midlife Creativity and Identity: Life into Art
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78754-333-1

Article
Publication date: 1 June 1998

Brian McKenna

The collocation ‘virtual community’ yokes together a hyper‐modern concept (the virtual, in the cyberspatial sense), and a more ancient one (community, in the sense of the…

Abstract

The collocation ‘virtual community’ yokes together a hyper‐modern concept (the virtual, in the cyberspatial sense), and a more ancient one (community, in the sense of the quality of people holding something in common, and possessing a sense of common identity). In Keywords, British socialist intellectual Raymond Williams recounts that from the seventeenth century (in English) ‘there are signs of the distinction which became especially important from the nineteenth century, in which community was felt to be more immediate than society’. (Williams 1976 p.65) This sense of community as being somehow more organic, more human than externally imposed forms of social organization informs the discussion around the word in the context of the Internet, too. Williams concludes his essay on the word by remarking that

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Online and CD-Rom Review, vol. 22 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1353-2642

Abstract

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Streaming Culture
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-768-6

Article
Publication date: 12 September 2016

Jacob R. Straus, Raymond T. Williams, Colleen J. Shogan and Matthew E. Glassman

The purpose of this paper is to understand why some Senators choose to use Twitter more frequently than others. Building on past research, which explored causal factors…

1130

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to understand why some Senators choose to use Twitter more frequently than others. Building on past research, which explored causal factors leading to early congressional adoption, theories about why some Senators use Twitter more frequently in their daily communications strategies are developed.

Design/methodology/approach

A “power user” score was developed by evaluating each Senator’s clout, interactivity, and originality on Twitter. These scores are then used as the dependent variable in a regression model to evaluate which factors influence Senators becoming Twitter “power users.”

Findings

The study found that: constituent income is positively correlated with heavy use, but constituent education level is not; the more ideological a Senator is the more he or she will be a Twitter power user; the number of days on Twitter is a significant indicator of advanced Twitter usage; and having staff dedicated to social media is positively correlated with being a Twitter power user.

Research limitations/implications

All Senators in the second session of the 113th Congress (2014) were evaluated. As such, future research hope to expand the data set to additional Senators or the House of Representatives.

Practical implications

A better understanding of why some Senators use Twitter more than others allows insight into constituent communications strategies and the potential implications of real-time communication on representation, and the role of accountability between a Senator and his or her constituents.

Originality/value

The study examines constituent communication by Senators in a new, more interactive medium than previously considered. Additionally, the study places findings about Senator’s constituent communication in the broader context of representation.

Details

Online Information Review, vol. 40 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1468-4527

Keywords

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 15 April 2021

David Arditi

Abstract

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Streaming Culture
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-768-6

Article
Publication date: 1 July 1966

IF we count the University of Strathclyde School of Librarianship as a “new” school—rather than simply an old school transferred from a College of Commerce to a…

51

Abstract

IF we count the University of Strathclyde School of Librarianship as a “new” school—rather than simply an old school transferred from a College of Commerce to a university—then four “new” schools were established between 1963 and 1964, three of the four in universities and the other closely linked with a university, though remaining independent. All four schools have their special features but I consider the more significant of Belfast's features to be its right, from the outset, to conduct all its own examinations for graduates and non‐graduates. Queen's was also the first British university to provide non‐graduates with courses in librarianship. (Strathclyde is the second.) All successful students are eligible for admission to the Register of Chartered Librarians (ALA) after they have completed the prescribed period of practical experience.

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New Library World, vol. 68 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

Abstract

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The Creative PhD: Challenges, Opportunities, Reflection
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-790-7

Article
Publication date: 1 September 1968

“FORMAL classes on how to use a library would be an insult to the intelligence of the student.” This was an extreme reply mentioned in the Report of the Committee on…

43

Abstract

“FORMAL classes on how to use a library would be an insult to the intelligence of the student.” This was an extreme reply mentioned in the Report of the Committee on Libraries, with reference to a questionnaire to academic staff about instruction in library use. This view of the teaching activities of librarians with students must be familiar to all librarians whether they are concerned with formal teaching activities or not. Nevertheless it is suggested that, in the current climate of change in the nature of sixth form studies, and the need for bibliographic training as part of a general education leading to informed library users in the academic and professional world, there is now a strong case for an examined course of study at “A” level G.C.E. incorporating the principles of bibliographical knowledge for users.

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New Library World, vol. 70 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

Article
Publication date: 15 October 2008

Jane Bryson

The purpose of this paper is to introduce a practical conceptual tool for analysing the dynamics of cultural change in organizations. In so doing it seeks to address two…

11949

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to introduce a practical conceptual tool for analysing the dynamics of cultural change in organizations. In so doing it seeks to address two concerns in the organization culture literature: issues of time and perspective which underlie the contested nature of culture; and limitations of existing analytical frameworks to cater for differing perspectives in a manner which is accessible to academics and practitioners.

Design/methodology/approach

Williams' notion of culture as a constant negotiation between the dominant, the emergent, and the residual cultures mediated by the processes of selective tradition and incorporation is discussed. For illustrative purposes this model is then used to analyse material collected in a case study of a growing IT organization.

Findings

The analysis framework identifies the paradoxes and potential tensions in the ongoing development of this organization. As a result it promotes questioning, and clarifies where choices are to be made.

Research limitations/implications

The paper shows how this framework can be used to assist investigation. Although the usual limitations of case study research apply, the framework facilitates a wider view of change over time.

Practical implications

The paper provides an accessible reflective framework that affords a more dynamic, contextual, evolutionary, and nuanced view of organizations. It accommodates multiple perspectives within an organization and facilitates their exploration.

Originality/value

The paper introduces the ideas of Raymond Williams to a wider organizational audience, and demonstrates how they can be adapted to make complex accounts of culture and organization more accessible.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 21 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 29 March 2019

Eve Mayes

The purpose of this paper is to consider historical shifts in the mobilisation of the concept of radical in relation to Australian schooling.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to consider historical shifts in the mobilisation of the concept of radical in relation to Australian schooling.

Design/methodology/approach

Two texts composed at two distinct points in a 40-year period in Australia relating to radicalism and education are strategically juxtaposed. These texts are: the first issue of the Radical Education Dossier (RED, 1976), and the Attorney General Department’s publication Preventing Violent Extremism and Radicalisation in Australia (PVERA, 2015). The analysis of the term radical in these texts is influenced by Raymond Williams’s examination of particular keywords in their historical and contemporary contexts.

Findings

Across these two texts, radical is deployed as adjective for a process of interrogating structured inequalities of the economy and employment, and as individualised noun attached to the “vulnerable” young person.

Social implications

Reading the first issue of RED alongside the PVERA text suggests the consequences of the reconstitution of the role of schools, teachers and the re-positioning of certain young people as “vulnerable”. The juxtaposition of these two texts surfaces contemporary patterns of the therapeutisation of political concerns.

Originality/value

A methodological contribution is offered to historical sociological analyses of shifts and continuities of the role of the school in relation to society.

Details

History of Education Review, vol. 48 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0819-8691

Keywords

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