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Article
Publication date: 1 July 1980

Raymond Loveridge and Albert Mok

In neo‐classical economic theory labour is a commodity and the ultimate value of the employer's services is determined by the sales value of the product of these services…

Abstract

In neo‐classical economic theory labour is a commodity and the ultimate value of the employer's services is determined by the sales value of the product of these services: the cost of supply reflects both the disutility of work for the recruit and his equalisation of net advantages between jobs. For modern labour economists the assumption that entrepreneurs require identical inputs of labour and the new recruits will therefore possess similar skills (the conditions of free competition) is an unrealistic one. Hence segmental labour market theory has grown out of the need to explain differences between shared needs and commonalities within each group of consumers (employers) on the one hand and suppliers (employees) on the other. In this way it has been possible to carry on assuming the existence of perfect competition on both sides of the market within the boundaries of labour markets thus defined.

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International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 7 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1975

William Egan

We tend to think only in terms of man acting upon the inanimate world. If one is dealing with things or numbers then laws may be deduced, equations derived and, if the…

Abstract

We tend to think only in terms of man acting upon the inanimate world. If one is dealing with things or numbers then laws may be deduced, equations derived and, if the right question is asked, the correct answer will come. This is the technology of science, but what one has to remember is that science has for its object — things. It can bring to bear the force of the ‘big machines’, the strength of the trained and gifted individual, but what it cannot do is to unleash power.

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Personnel Review, vol. 4 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1983

In the last four years, since Volume I of this Bibliography first appeared, there has been an explosion of literature in all the main functional areas of business. This…

Abstract

In the last four years, since Volume I of this Bibliography first appeared, there has been an explosion of literature in all the main functional areas of business. This wealth of material poses problems for the researcher in management studies — and, of course, for the librarian: uncovering what has been written in any one area is not an easy task. This volume aims to help the librarian and the researcher overcome some of the immediate problems of identification of material. It is an annotated bibliography of management, drawing on the wide variety of literature produced by MCB University Press. Over the last four years, MCB University Press has produced an extensive range of books and serial publications covering most of the established and many of the developing areas of management. This volume, in conjunction with Volume I, provides a guide to all the material published so far.

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Management Decision, vol. 21 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1997

Ethne Swartz and Ruth Boaden

Describes the combination of research methods used to investigate the process of Information Management (IM) in small firms. IM was defined as encompassing all management…

Abstract

Describes the combination of research methods used to investigate the process of Information Management (IM) in small firms. IM was defined as encompassing all management issues related to Information Systems (IS) and involving processes relating to planning, organization, control and technology.A large body of literature details the issues associated with IM in large organizations, assisting the understanding of the processes involved in this organizational context. This is not the case for small firms. Due to the different situational context of small firms, it is essential that the issues associated with IM be made explicit. Argues that a “between‐methods” triangulated approach is most suitable for researching IM in small firms, enabling cross‐validation of data yielded by different methods. The research approach was inductive, making use of a combination of quantitative and qualitative methods. A mailed questionnaire study was conducted to identify macro level phenomena which were investigated at a later stage by developing case studies of four companies which had participated in the questionnaire study. This second phase of the research provided rich data on phenomena which occur at the micro level. The use of multi‐site studies overcame the problems associated with the specificity of single case studies. The findings of the two research strategies were reconciled using Grounded Theory; conclusions were drawn and models generated for use by other researchers.

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International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1987

Richard Whipp

The work of Craig Calhoun is examined as a perspective on the operation of community structures. Three facets are considered: Calhoun's model of the pre‐industrial…

Abstract

The work of Craig Calhoun is examined as a perspective on the operation of community structures. Three facets are considered: Calhoun's model of the pre‐industrial community resting on linked multiple social relationships; parallel studies; comparisons across time and between regional or national settings. The conventional view is that national societal differences have been paramount in differentiating the long‐term profiles (e.g. economic growth) of nation states. Here the continuing importance of localised patterns of economic and social activity is emphasised.

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International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1982

The volume and range of food law enforcement in the field of purity and quality control has grown dramatically in recent times. Only those able to recall the subject from…

Abstract

The volume and range of food law enforcement in the field of purity and quality control has grown dramatically in recent times. Only those able to recall the subject from upwards of half a century ago can really appreciate the changes. Compositional control now appears as more of a closely knit field of its own, keeping pace with the advances of food processing, new methods and raw materials. It has its problems but enforcement agencies appear well able to cope with them, e.g. the restructuring of meat, excess water content, fat content, the application of compositional standards to new products, especially meat products, but the most difficult of all areas is that of securing and maintaining acceptable standards of food hygiene. This is one of the most important duties of environmental health officers, with a considerable impact on health and public concern; and one of the most intractible problems, comparable in its results with the insidious onslaught of the ever‐growing problem of noise, another area dependent on the reactions of people; to use an oft repeated cliche — “the human element”.

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British Food Journal, vol. 84 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2001

Paul Hursthouse and Darl Kolb

The establishment of new plants in greenfield sites is a strategic organisational initiative providing the opportunity to develop alternative systems of staff values and…

Abstract

The establishment of new plants in greenfield sites is a strategic organisational initiative providing the opportunity to develop alternative systems of staff values and beliefs which may be more appropriate for capitalising on external product market opportunities. Explores whether an alternative organisational culture can be established at a greenfield site within a New Zealand food processing plant. This case organisation utilised the provisions of the Employment Contracts Act 1991 to establish alternative employment conditions in the greenfield site to those of its brownfield site. A comparative analysis was made utilising quantitative organisational culture data from Human Synergistic’s Organisation Culture Inventory. The data reveal the similarities and differences between the greenfield and brownfield sites and provide the basis for discussion of whether culture can be managed through the mechanism of a greenfield site. Critical elements in creating a desired culture are identified.

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Personnel Review, vol. 30 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

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