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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2006

Raymond L. Calabrese

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401

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International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 20 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2006

Raymond L. Calabrese

The purpose of this paper is to explore the ecology of collaboration between school and university partners using an appreciative inquiry theoretical perspective and to…

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2600

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the ecology of collaboration between school and university partners using an appreciative inquiry theoretical perspective and to demonstrate how it enhances the social capital in school and university partnerships.

Design/methodology/approach

A case study of a partnership of an inner‐city high school and university doctoral action research was explored in the frameworks of mutuality, social capital, and appreciative inquiry. The theoretical perspective of appreciative inquiry served as the basis for the mutuality between administrators and faculty in the inner‐city high school and the doctoral action research team.

Findings

Findings suggest that approaching school‐university partnerships through an appreciative inquiry theoretical perspective creates an environment for building trust, sharing knowledge, and increasing bridging capital, thus benefiting both the school and university.

Originality/value

The action research team formed a partnership with teachers and administrators. The action research was transformed by the partnership and reports showed substantial progress in student achievement scores in mathematics and science. Hopefully, some of that achievement can be attributed to the research and the paper on which it is based.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 20 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

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Article
Publication date: 22 February 2011

Teresa L. San Martin and Raymond L. Calabrese

The purpose of this study is to identify how at‐risk high school students in an alternative school describe how they best learn and to extrapolate their preferred learning…

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2301

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to identify how at‐risk high school students in an alternative school describe how they best learn and to extrapolate their preferred learning practices to improve teacher pedagogical practices.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors used a qualitative case study design to facilitate the first two stages of an appreciative inquiry (AI) 4‐D cycle – discovery and dream. Eight alternative high school students, four males and four females, were purposively selected as participants. Data collection methods included: group discussions, semi‐structured paired interviews, and participant generated documents and visual presentation for district administrators and teachers. Data were analyzed using content analysis, open coding, axial coding, text analysis software, and pattern matching.

Findings

The study produced four salient findings: relevant experiences were important for learning; a cooperative and respectful learning environment is a core value; learning should be enjoyable; and, the concept of family became an important metaphor for the learning environment.

Originality/value

The findings from this study suggest that further research with AI in educational settings may have important implications to inspire educators to think in new ways about learning.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 25 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1991

David E. Bartz and Raymond L. Calabrese

During the 1980s, much criticism surfaced regarding the need formanagers and executives to be more effectively prepared for their rolesand responsibilities. Graduate…

Abstract

During the 1980s, much criticism surfaced regarding the need for managers and executives to be more effectively prepared for their roles and responsibilities. Graduate business schools were identified as one source which needed to improve because a business degree often represents a significant part of managers′ and executives′ preparation. In addition to reviewing content, graduate business schools need to improve the methods used to deliver content. Specifically, they need to incorporate successful methods used in private and governmental organisations to train and develop managers. These methods include role play, case method, in‐basket technique, games, computer based training, learning contracts, assessment centres, shadowing, structured self‐assessment and mentoring.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1999

Raymond L. Calabrese and Sally J. Zepeda

The process of training and preparing principals is driven by a characteristics model. Underlying each of the components in the characteristics model is decision making…

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4492

Abstract

The process of training and preparing principals is driven by a characteristics model. Underlying each of the components in the characteristics model is decision making. Decision making defines the work of principals. Those who prepare principals can improve the leadership quality of principals and thereby impact school effectiveness by focusing on decision making. Decision‐making assessment is a critical component to principal preparation and ongoing development. It can be used to assess the quality of decisions made by prospective and acting school administrations. Through decision‐making assessment principals can become aware of their cognitive decision‐making patterns thus allowing them opportunity to replace potentially dysfunctional patterns with patterns that are more effective and efficient.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 2001

Raymond L. Calabrese and Brian Roberts

The actions of school leaders have direct and profound ethical implications on their organizations and corresponding stakeholders. Each action impacts the ethical notion…

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1689

Abstract

The actions of school leaders have direct and profound ethical implications on their organizations and corresponding stakeholders. Each action impacts the ethical notion of mutuality and either adds to or detracts from the existing social capital in the school leader’s organization and surrounding school community. Whether or not the school leader chooses to act out of self‐interest and contribute to the growth of fragmentation in the organization or chooses to act with integrity based on sound ethical principles is determined in large extent by the school leader’s character.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 15 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

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Article
Publication date: 22 May 2007

Raymond L. Calabrese, Crystal Hummel and Teresa San Martin

The purpose of this paper is to examine the issue of at‐risk students in a rural district in Midwestern USA.

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1793

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the issue of at‐risk students in a rural district in Midwestern USA.

Design/methodology/approach

This field‐based research study used a qualitative embedded case study of a middle and high school informed by an appreciative inquiry theoretical research perspective to identify a positive core of teacher and administrator experiences related to at‐risk students. At‐risk students are those who under‐perform in mandated academic assessments as well as school‐related academic achievement. Social capital and appreciative inquiry served as theoretical perspectives. Focus groups, semi‐structured interviews, and an online survey were the primary data‐gathering methods.

Findings

Three findings illustrated the gap between present practice and the ideal state. The research team concluded that there was a foundation of positive core experiences from which to build on the espoused theory of caring professed by teachers and administrators.

Originality/value

The study's results can further teachers' and administrators' understanding of their problem‐based language that emphasizes the deficits of at‐risk students and their parents.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 21 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2002

Raymond L. Calabrese and Brian Roberts

Character is at the core of leadership. Leaders with virtuous character provide benefit to their schools and communities. Whereas, leaders with character flaws create harm…

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1977

Abstract

Character is at the core of leadership. Leaders with virtuous character provide benefit to their schools and communities. Whereas, leaders with character flaws create harm for themselves as well as their community. The ethical lapses among teachers, principals, and superintendents create an even larger issue when one considers the fiduciary trust placed in educators by the public. Character development requires behavioral change as well as knowledge acquisition. Incorporating behavioral change into university administrator preparation programs requires faculty to consider recent findings in neuroscience on how the brain learns and the incorporation of these findings into program design and instruction.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 16 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

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Article
Publication date: 17 February 2012

Raymond L. Calabrese

The purpose of this study is to advance the preparation of prospective school administrator students by extending the Web 2.0 application of blogging to discover students'…

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792

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to advance the preparation of prospective school administrator students by extending the Web 2.0 application of blogging to discover students' strengths and successful leadership experiences. During the blogging process, students reflected on and responded to appreciative inquiry (AI) blog posts that encouraged reflective responses highlighting and identifying their inherent leadership strengths and successful leadership experiences.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative case study model was used to explore the reflective blog contributions of prospective school administrators to discover patterns in the blogging data by grounding the study in an AI theoretical research perspective. A bounded case study delimited the scope of the study to participants who were: masters or doctoral students in a school administration preparation program at a large Midwestern United States research extensive university; and enrolled in four graduate administrative preparation classes taught using reflective blogging over three instructional quarters.

Findings

The Web 2.0 application of appreciative inquiry blogging: confirmed personal strengths and successful leadership experiences; bolstered a supportive learning environment; confirmed the students' history of successful leadership experiences; and increased social capital among students.

Social implications

Future research using AI in Web 2.0 applications can influence the positive preparation of school administrators by preparing them to lead schools in an evolving digital world. Researchers may examine how an AI blogging Web 2.0 application contributes to changing personal perceptions of contemporary deficit views of schooling to what is possible in light of stakeholders' strengths.

Originality/value

The importance of integrating Web 2.0 applications into educational administrator preparation programs is critical in an age where elementary and secondary school students live in a Web 2.0 world and build social networks with peers throughout the globe. Moreover, the evolving global workplace demands fluency in Web 2.0 applications.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 26 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2000

Raymond L. Calabrese and Alan Shoho

Aims to examine a model for overcoming traditional, culturally rooted resistance to change in educational administration programs. Universities that are unable to change…

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1814

Abstract

Aims to examine a model for overcoming traditional, culturally rooted resistance to change in educational administration programs. Universities that are unable to change operate as dysfunctional organizations and display symptoms that reflect addictive behavior. Healthy organizations facilitate change and adapt to evolving contexts. Conceptualizes change as having its genesis in a learning organizational model. The learning organization model aligns the three existing cultures inherent in universities and educational administration programs. By aligning the operator, engineer, and executive cultures within the university, microstructures such as educational administration programs are able to embrace the chaotic temperament inherent in the university and evolve into a generative environment that moves from linear construction toward a fuzzy adaptation to changing contexts.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 14 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

Keywords

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