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Article
Publication date: 20 February 2017

Raymond Talinbe Abdulai and Edward Ochieng

The assertion that land registration guarantees landownership security is common knowledge. Thus, efforts at securing landownership in particularly, the developing world…

Abstract

Purpose

The assertion that land registration guarantees landownership security is common knowledge. Thus, efforts at securing landownership in particularly, the developing world have concentrated on the formulation and implementation of land registration policies. However, over the years, whilst some studies claim that land registration assures security, a lot of other studies have established that security cannot be guaranteed by land registration. Also, there is evidence from research that has shown that land registration can be a source of ownership insecurity in some cases. The purpose of this paper is to critically analyse the underpinning principles of land registration and their application in order to establish whether or not land registration can actually guarantee ownership security.

Design/methodology/approach

It is a literature review paper that looks at the existing literature on landownership, security and land registration systems. The land registration principles that have been subjected to critical analysis are the publicity function of land registration, the legality of ownership emanating from land registration and the warranty provided by the State in land registration, specifically, under the Torrens system.

Findings

An analysis of the underpinning principles of land registration shows that land registration per se cannot guarantee ownership security and this helps to explain the findings of the numerous studies, which have established that landownership security cannot be assured by land registration. The paper concludes by identifying the right role of land registration as well as a mechanism that can effectively protect or secure landownership.

Practical implications

Land registration policies and programmes in the developing world are often funded by the international donor community and the findings provide useful insights regarding the actual role of land registration and for policy change in terms of what can secure landownership.

Originality/value

Even though there are two schools of thought regarding research on the link between land registration on one hand, and landownership security on the other, none of the studies has made an attempt to consider the nexus by critically examining the principles that underpin land registration to support their arguments.

Details

Property Management, vol. 35 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-7472

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 3 April 2018

Edward Godfrey Ochieng, Oghenemarho Omaruaye Ovbagbedia, Tarila Zuofa, Raymond Abdulai, Wilfred Matipa, Ximing Ruan and Akunna Oledinma

The purpose of this paper is to examine the efficacy of knowledge management (KM) based systems and best practices that could be used to address operational issues in the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the efficacy of knowledge management (KM) based systems and best practices that could be used to address operational issues in the oil and gas sector.

Design/methodology/approach

Given little was known empirically about the strategies and practices which contribute to improved performance, innovation and continuous improvement in the oil and gas sector qualitative method was used. Semi-structured interviews were used to derive senior managers’ constructs of project delivery efficiency and KM based systems. The interviews were analysed through the use of a qualitative analysis software package NUDIST NVivoTM. Participants were selected using purposive sampling. Validity and reliability were achieved by first assessing the plausibility in terms of already existing knowledge on some of the operational issues raised by participants.

Findings

These were synthesised into a framework capturing seven well-defined stages. All these steps emerged as being related; they are comprised of independent variables. These steps were found to comprise of knowledge management technology approaches, knowledge management people approaches, KM strategies and value enhancing practices.

Research limitations/implications

Although the findings are pertinent to oil and gas organisations, it will be important to conduct follow-up research validating the potential for using the results of this study to establish frameworks for knowledge and information management in different organisations and contexts. This will provide not only data about the validity of the framework in generic terms but will also generate additional data on the application of KM strategy.

Practical implications

As shown in this study, successful KM based systems requires the aligning of business strategy, technology for KM, project management operations with an enterprise knowledge-sharing culture. Such sharing requires managing the behaviour of project personnel such that knowledge transfer becomes part of the organisation’s norm.

Social implications

The implementation of KM based systems requires deliberate planning and action to create the conditions for success and put in place the strategy, leadership, goals, process, skills, systems, issue resolution, and structure to direct and exploit the dynamic nature of project work. The strategies proposed in this research cannot be expected to resolve all KM issues in the oil and gas sector. However, their use defines an approach that is superior to the traditional approaches typically adopted and consequently merits far wider application.

Originality/value

The proposed framework presents a better way of optimising the performance of project-based operations thus enabling oil and gas organisations to reform their poor performance on projects and empower them to better manage emerging cultural challenges in their future projects. Reflecting on their experiences, the participants confirmed that the proposed KM framework and its seven well-defined stages were central to the effectiveness of KM in oil and gas operations. Although the scope of this research was restricted to projects in Nigeria and the UK, the geographical focus of this research does not invalidate these results with respect to other countries. The fact is that the oil and gas sector globally shares some common fundamental characteristics.

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Abstract

Details

Sustainable Real Estate in the Developing World
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-838-8

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Book part
Publication date: 29 March 2021

Raymond Talinbe Abdulai and Kwasi Gyau Baffour Awuah

The United Nations (UN) sustainable development goals (SDGs) that became effective at the commencement of January 2016 constitute a global community agreement calling for…

Abstract

The United Nations (UN) sustainable development goals (SDGs) that became effective at the commencement of January 2016 constitute a global community agreement calling for action to end poverty, protect the planet and ensure that all people enjoy peace and prosperity. This chapter looks at the nexus between real estate (RE) and SDGs by investigating the extent to which Ghana's RE sector incorporates, especially, environmental sustainability principles from the design and construction stages to occupation, operation and activities aimed at helping to solve the problem of climate change, thereby, contributing to achieving the SDGs. The chapter is theoretical and, therefore, heavily reliant on critical review of relevant extant literature. The chapter has shown that RE cuts across virtually all the sectors that contribute greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, which over the years have generally been increasing. Only a few buildings in both the private and public sectors (six located in three of the 16 administrative regions in the country) are officially classified as green based on three sustainability-rating systems currently used in the country, which suggests that the uptake of green building technologies (GBTs) is rather low leading to the conclusion that at the moment, the RE sector is not contributing much towards the attainment of the SDGs. However, it may be the case that there are buildings, which are sustainable in one form or the other, but because they have not been officially certified, they are not regarded as green – employing the services of the sustainability-rating agencies to certify buildings involve significant costs that might serve as a barrier in accessing their services. Thus, there is the need for country-wide, large-scale studies that systematically investigate the uptake of GBTs in the private and public RE sectors (not necessarily based on using the rating systems) as that may reveal the actual uptake of GBTs and what can be done policy-wise based on the outcomes of such studies.

Details

Sustainable Real Estate in the Developing World
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-838-8

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 29 March 2021

Kwasi Gyau Baffour Awuah and Raymond Talinbe Abdulai

Although a basic need, housing and its development activities impinge on the environment. As part of efforts to promote sustainability, there have been several initiatives…

Abstract

Although a basic need, housing and its development activities impinge on the environment. As part of efforts to promote sustainability, there have been several initiatives since the Brundtland Commission's work in 1987 to minimise the adverse impact of housing development activities on the environment in the developing world such as sub-Saharan Africa (SSA). This chapter explores housing development activities in Ghana within the context of environmental sustainability based on the extant literature. The aim is to examine the state and promotion of environmental sustainability in the housing development sector. The chapter establishes that although there are some efforts to promote environmental sustainability within the housing development sector, uptake of environmental sustainability practices has been less satisfactory due to lack of incentives as stakeholders perceive that environmentally sustainable homes are more expensive than conventional ones. The chapter, therefore, recommends further investigations into the cost and benefit of environmentally sustainable homes as well as other drivers in Ghana to give additional insights to provide the appropriate doses of incentives both contrived and instinctive to drive uptake.

Details

Sustainable Real Estate in the Developing World
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-838-8

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 17 August 2010

Raymond T. Abdulai and Felix N. Hammond

There is a longstanding argument that landed property market information management via land registration guarantees accessibility to loans from financial institutions for…

Abstract

Purpose

There is a longstanding argument that landed property market information management via land registration guarantees accessibility to loans from financial institutions for investment and wealth creation in developing economies. Thus, land registration has been prescribed as the solution to the problem of poverty and underdevelopment. The purpose of this paper is to critically examine the link that exists between land registration and access to investment loans from banks.

Design/methodology/approach

The study employed the qualitative research approach using empirical data from Ghana. Banks constituted the survey participants, and data were collected by administering a mainly open‐ended questionnaire to loans officers of 18 banks. The data was coded with the aid of Nvivo for analysis.

Findings

It has been established that: financial capability of potential mortgagors is the main criterion used by banks to grant investment loans; and land registration is not a prerequisite in mortgage transactions – it is a post‐requirement. These empirical findings are corroborated by the evidence adduced from a critical analysis of literature on the land registration system of a Western nation such as Britain.

Practical implications

To address the problem of poverty requires the implementation of policies and programmes that would empower the poor financially on a sustainable basis. Land registration per se cannot “unlock” investment capital.

Originality/value

Studies that have investigated the link between land registration and access to formal credit tend to focus on the demand side of the mortgage market. This paper, however, concentrates on the supply side by examining the prerequisites for investment loan applications. Such a study in Ghana is notably non‐existent and this is the first of its kind.

Details

Property Management, vol. 28 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-7472

Keywords

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 29 March 2021

Abstract

Details

Sustainable Real Estate in the Developing World
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-838-8

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Article
Publication date: 4 May 2012

Daniel Domeher and Raymond Abdulai

The purpose of this paper is to critically examine the argument linking land registration to agricultural investment and to provide theoretical reasons as to why this…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to critically examine the argument linking land registration to agricultural investment and to provide theoretical reasons as to why this linkage may not materialise in Africa within the short to medium term.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper takes the form of a critical review of the relevant literature on land registration, access to credit and agricultural investment; arguments are built on empirical studies found in the literature and theoretical concepts.

Findings

It has been established in this paper that the links between landed property registration and agricultural investments are made defective in Africa by factors such as poverty, lack of appropriate agro‐based infrastructure and the fact that land registration per se does not improve the profitability of agriculture, neither does it improve access to credit.

Research limitations/implications

The fact that this paper is based on literature review may be seen as a weakness to some extent.

Originality/value

Even though previous researchers have looked at the relationship between landed property registration and agricultural investment in the developing world, they fall short of critically explaining why land registration has been found not to enhance agricultural investment. This paper fills the gap through a combination of various theoretical and practical arguments which could call for a rethinking on the policies for promoting agricultural growth. The rigorous theoretical argument may also provide the basis for further empirical research.

Details

Agricultural Finance Review, vol. 72 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-1466

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 29 March 2021

Kwasi Gyau Baffour Awuah and Raymond Talinbe Abdulai

Progress under sustainability principles is now widely accepted as the goal that every society should pursue. Whilst the built environment has imbibed these sustainability…

Abstract

Progress under sustainability principles is now widely accepted as the goal that every society should pursue. Whilst the built environment has imbibed these sustainability principles just like many other sectors, scholarly works that bring together experiences of real estate and sustainability are limited. Contributors to this book in accordance with the aim of the book examine real estate and sustainability in the developing world drawing on experiences from several countries. This conclusion chapter summarises the discussions in the book highlighting implications and prospects. The chapter notes that the threat to the destruction of the environment in the developing world is real and the real estate and urban development sector is at the forefront of this threat. Furthermore, although adoption of sustainability principles is seen as very relevant to abate the threat, progress in uptake of the principles within the real estate and urban development sector has rather been slow due to lack of incentives, funding, technology and robust policies; inadequate knowledge and awareness; and poor planning among others. Changes in practices from business as usual to ones which promote effective planning, building knowledge and databases through research and increase in funding for sustainable projects and education among other things as ways to improve uptake are proposed with the recognition of huge prospect for developing countries to overcome the current situation given recent initiatives and available knowledge.

Details

Sustainable Real Estate in the Developing World
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-838-8

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 29 March 2021

Raymond Talinbe Abdulai and Kwasi Gyau Baffour Awuah

The world has been witnessing a new dreadful disease since the latter part of 2019. The disease known as the novel coronavirus disease often referred to as COVID-19…

Abstract

The world has been witnessing a new dreadful disease since the latter part of 2019. The disease known as the novel coronavirus disease often referred to as COVID-19 originated from the Chinese city of Wuhan in the Hubei province and has since spread across the world resulting in the World Health Organisation to declare it a global pandemic. Whilst it appears obvious that the pandemic continues to generate several impacts, knowledge of the true idea, nature and extent of the impacts is scanty, partly because the disease is novel, ongoing and an antidote is yet to be found for it as well as the fact that no or little systematic studies have been conducted into the impacts and the results codified. This study, therefore, explores the global overview of the environmental and socioeconomic impacts of COVID-19 based on evidence in the literature. The chapter found that several measures such as imposition of partial or total lockdowns, social distancing and stay-at-home policies, wearing of face masks and the use of gloves and hand sanitizers have been instituted to contain the pandemic since its outbreak. Apart from 4,766,468 infections with 318,201 deaths, which had occurred as at 19 May 2020 and are still counting, the measures instituted have resulted in increase in domestic energy consumption, generation of waste pollution, contraction in production, loss of income and jobs, disruption in market activities and depreciation in asset prices and values across the various sectors of the world's economy, increases in domestic violence and limited access to health services among others. Conversely, the pandemic has partly resulted in positive outcomes such as reduction in greenhouse gas emissions and boost in the operations of the ITC and other allied industries. However, in broad terms, it is a huge threat to sustainable development (SD) and gains made in that regard over the years are eroding. Furthermore, although there have been interventions from governments, United Nations and other international development organisations to ease the adverse impacts, more such interventions and efforts will be required to put the SD agenda on track.

Details

Sustainable Real Estate in the Developing World
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-838-8

Keywords

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