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Book part
Publication date: 23 October 2017

Elina De Simone, Marcella D’Uva and Giuseppe Lucio Gaeta

This chapter focuses on the impact of national economic conditions and voters’ attitudes on the positioning of European national political parties with regard to the…

Abstract

This chapter focuses on the impact of national economic conditions and voters’ attitudes on the positioning of European national political parties with regard to the European Union (EU). We provide an empirical analysis based on data gathered through the Chapel Hill Expert Survey (CHES) covering parties from 14 European countries observed over the 1999–2010 time span. We perform a regression analysis where the dependent variable measures the position of political parties vis-à-vis EU integration and explanatory variables include a number of measures of national economic conditions, features of the national political and institutional framework and voters’ Euroscepticism. Fixed effect, ordered logit and fractional logit estimates provide the following main results. Compared with other parties, non-mainstream political parties and those acting in established economies are more prone to mirror citizens’ Eurosceptic sentiments. National economic conditions such as inflation as well as gross domestic product (GDP) growth affect mainstream party support for the EU. Smaller and ideologically extreme parties are, on average, less supportive of European integration.

Details

Economic Imbalances and Institutional Changes to the Euro and the European Union
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-510-8

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2009

Ray Marks

The purpose of this article is to provide a rationale for and background to the present contributions in this special issue on school health education.

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2763

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this article is to provide a rationale for and background to the present contributions in this special issue on school health education.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper argues that health promotion in schools has a vital place to play in improving the health of children, summarises the key themes that emerge from the five papers in the issue and contextualizes them within the current health promotion literature.

Findings

The issue makes clear that there are several important ways in which health educators can foster the wellbeing of school health children who merit further research and the attention of policy makers. All have something to say about children in the classroom setting, and in particular their exposure to personal and situational events that can impact on their wellbeing and educational attainment, and possibilities for developing the knowledge, skills, motivation, and support they need to choose health‐enhancing behaviors. They comment particularly on the need to address teacher motivation, and involve parents.

Originality/value

The research and ideas embedded in this special issue can assist in the development or improvements of school‐based health promotion programs and provide some direction about what action is needed in future and why.

Details

Health Education, vol. 109 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

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Article
Publication date: 30 August 2011

Ray Marks

The purpose of this editorial is to provide an overview and brief summary of the present contributions to this third volume of recent Health Education Special Issue…

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716

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this editorial is to provide an overview and brief summary of the present contributions to this third volume of recent Health Education Special Issue submissions on Healthy Schools and Colleges, commissioned early in 2010.

Design/methodology/approach

Authors working in the health education arena in either the school or college venues were invited to submit papers concerning current research‐related findings that addressed the topic of “what works, what is needed, and why?” as regards school‐based health education and health promotion efforts. After undergoing traditional peer review, five submissions fulfilling the basic criteria relevant to this volume were selected.

Findings

As in earlier volumes, the five papers reported here are reasonably diverse, and cover both the nature of common health problems and/or their solutions in schools, as well as college venues. In line with the first and second volumes of the 2010 series, all authors concur that multiple, rather than single, strategies are needed to support school‐based health programmes and health‐promoting behaviors. They also highlight the fact that health in schools is determined by both individual and collective health behaviors, and multiple rather than single stakeholders are needed to promote the implementation of efficacious programs and their sustainability.

Originality/value

While more research is needed, the ideas embedded in this special issue can assist stakeholders to develop or improve the efficacy and sustainability of school‐ and college‐based health promotion programs. The data specifically provide some direction about what is needed collectively to foster the health of the young people in the context of the health promoting school or college.

Details

Health Education, vol. 111 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

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Article
Publication date: 19 October 2010

Ray Marks

The purpose of this editorial is to provide an overview and brief commentary concerning the present contributions to this third special issue on “Healthy schools and colleges”.

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748

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this editorial is to provide an overview and brief commentary concerning the present contributions to this third special issue on “Healthy schools and colleges”.

Design/methodology/approach

Authors working in the field of school or college health education were invited to submit their work to Health Education for purposes of review by their peers. After undergoing the traditional peer review process, five submissions that fulfilled the basic criteria relevant to this issue were selected for publication.

Findings

While reasonably diverse, these five contributions all confirm that, while the evidence base as well as the support for using the school as a venue to promote health are increasing, multiple considerations as well as approaches are required in order to successfully implement health‐oriented programs in the school and/or college setting. In addition to careful planning, and allocation of resources, in line with the first part of this 2010 series, all authors concur that multiple rather than single strategies are needed at all phases of program planning and implementation if sustainable efficacious programs are sought. Key strategies include having a socio‐ecological perspective, adequate teacher training, effective partnerships, policy support, and parental “buy‐in”.

Originality/value

While more research is needed, the ideas embedded in this special issue can assist stakeholders who wish to develop or improve the sustainability of school‐ and college‐based health promotion programs. The data specifically provide some direction about what is needed to do collectively to foster the health of the young people in the context of the health‐promoting school or college.

Details

Health Education, vol. 110 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

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Book part
Publication date: 29 January 2021

Simon Toubeau

How are we to make sense of the attitudes of Social Democratic parties towards decentralisation? What do they think about what is a legitimate territorial allocation of…

Abstract

How are we to make sense of the attitudes of Social Democratic parties towards decentralisation? What do they think about what is a legitimate territorial allocation of power? What factors shapes this view? And what makes Social Democratic parties change their minds? This article addresses these questions by way of competing ideological traditions, the external strategic incentives and internal constraints. Empirically, the article presents a comparative case-study analysis of Social Democratic parties in four countries (Belgium, Italy, Spain and United Kingdom). On the basis of this analysis, I argue that the positioning of Social Democratic parties on decentralisation is influenced by strategic incentives created by the structure of political competition, whereas the policy shifts are more often produced by factors that are internal to the party. A decentralist policy shift is always associated with the capacity of regionalist parties to set the agenda by exerting pressures on Social Democratic parties. In addition, Social Democratic parties tend to shift their policy while in opposition to distinguish themselves from their centralist mainstream rival in government. The dominant mechanism found across four countries was one in which regional branches persuade the central party leadership to adopt a pro-decentralist position. This chapter illustrates how Social Democratic parties have an instinct for ‘adaptation and control’ in the face of social-structural changes, and it demonstrates that the prevalence of different ideological traditions will vary according to external strategic incentives and, crucially, by the party's internal ability to follow those incentives.

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Book part
Publication date: 13 January 2010

Tony Kazda and Bob Caves

Abstract

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Airport Design and Operation
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-08-054643-8

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Abstract

Details

Review of Marketing Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-728-5

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Article
Publication date: 22 June 2010

Ray Marks

Downloads
850

Abstract

Details

Health Education, vol. 110 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2005

Ray Marks

Reflects on the prevailing health inequities across the globe and attempts to address some of these global health determinants and related global injustices.

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1154

Abstract

Purpose

Reflects on the prevailing health inequities across the globe and attempts to address some of these global health determinants and related global injustices.

Design/methodology/approach

Specifically focuses on potential directives for achieving the lofty goal of “health for all” through improved health promotion efforts.

Findings

The concept of “health for all”, envisages the attainment of a level of health that permits all the people of the world to lead a socially and economically productive life and this goal has been guiding health strategies all over the world for the past two decades. However, in the present day heterogeneous world, where wide disparities in health and social conditions exist between and within countries and regions, achievements in health are disturbingly dissimilar.

Originality/value

Presents a health promotion perspective that could advance the ideal of “health for all”.

Details

Health Education, vol. 105 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

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Article
Publication date: 19 October 2010

Viv Speller, Jenny Byrne, Sue Dewhirst, Palo Almond, Lisa Mohebati, Melanie Norman, Sarah Polack, Anjum Memon, Marcus Grace, Barrie Margetts and Paul Roderick

The purpose of this paper is to report the outcome of an education and public health collaboration investigating the impact of adapted training to enhance teachers'…

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1200

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to report the outcome of an education and public health collaboration investigating the impact of adapted training to enhance teachers' potential role to promote child health and wellbeing.

Design/methodology/approach

The study was conducted in three phases: a survey of the health education content in universities in initial teacher training courses; a longitudinal survey at the commencement and completion of courses to capture trainees' knowledge, skills and attitudes towards health and their role in health promotion; and mapping curriculum content against qualified teacher standards and public health competencies.

Findings

Training about health varies largely between institutions. Trainees' knowledge levels remained low after training; ranked importance of key health topics – nutrition, alcohol, smoking, – decreased significantly; a majority thought that teachers and schools play an important role in health promotion, but significant increases were also noted in the minority who thought health promotion is not part of their remit (Phase 2).

Originality/value

To the best of one's knowledge, similar work has not so far been reported. While teachers are in a prime position to influence child health, trainees require knowledge and skills to realise their public health potential.

Details

Health Education, vol. 110 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

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