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Article
Publication date: 4 June 2018

Ray Green, Piyush Tiwari, Jyoti Rao and Ricki Hersburgh

The purpose of this study was to explore strategies used by developers of master-planned housing development projects in Victoria, Australia, for obtaining certification…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study was to explore strategies used by developers of master-planned housing development projects in Victoria, Australia, for obtaining certification under the Urban Development Institute of Australia’s (UDIA) EnviroDevelopment (ED) sustainable development certification programme. To be awarded ED certification, a development must demonstrate that it meets the assessment criteria within at least four of the six ED “leaves”. These leaves relate to its performance in terms of energy, water, materials, waste, community and ecosystems. This study explored how developers make choices regarding sustainability features they build into the planning, design and management of their developments to gain the leaves needed for ED certification. Having this certification is valued by developers as it can be used to demonstrate the sustainability credentials of their developments to potential house buyers, the validity of which is backed up by a trusted independent non-profit organisation (UDIA).

Design/methodology/approach

The study sought to quantify the preferential weightings of nine developers in selecting ED “leaves” and the strategies they use for meeting the assessment criteria needed to obtain selected ED leaves. This was done using a novel data collection and analysis method, the analytical hierarchical process (AHP), which relies on respondents, in this case, developers of ED certified development projects, making pairwise comparisons between choices of different development factors associated with the different ED “leaves”.

Findings

The most highly preferred ED leaves were found to be community, energy and ecosystems. “Community facilities” and “on-site transportation” were the two most highly weighted factors associated with the community leaf. Energy, the next most preferred leaf, was most highly weighted on “saving on operational costs” for the consumers (home buyers). Here consumer demand factors seem to be driving preferences. The ecology leaf was the next most preferred, with “existing site conditions” being the most highly weighted factor for this leaf. For sites that already contain significant areas of indigenous habitat, such as wetlands, selecting this leaf would seem to be an attractive, and potentially lower cost, option. Existing ecologically significant natural areas that are preserved, and where necessary enhanced, can be used for marketing purposes and serve in fulfilling planning open-space contribution requirements. The developers were more indifferent to the water, waste and materials leaves; however, the water leaf was rated slightly higher than the other two and was most strongly associated with “recycled water” and opportunities for “water conservation”, another example of demand factors driving preferences.

Originality/value

The results of this study reveal the preferences of a small sample of developers in terms of how they weigh different factors in making decisions about acquiring sustainability certification for residential master-planned development projects through the UDIA’S ED programme. The findings provide insight into the types of decisions developers make in the process of seeking ED certification, which includes considerations of site characteristics, costs, predicted effectiveness of different interventions and usefulness for marketing and other factors in terms of which ED leaves to pursue and how to acquire them to gain ED certification. The study also tested the AHP method as a methodological tool for addressing this question. Modifications in how data are collected using the on-line survey can be made to allow the method to be more easily used with larger respondent sample sizes. Collection of more focussed data elicited from respondents with specific areas of expertise, for example, specialists in energy, water, landscape architecture and planning, ecology and other relevant areas of knowledge, should also been considered.

Details

International Journal of Housing Markets and Analysis, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8270

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Article
Publication date: 2 October 2017

Sanjeev Verma

The purpose of this paper is to find the niche segmentation of green consumers as a solution to psychographic or demographic predicament. Age cohort and generational…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to find the niche segmentation of green consumers as a solution to psychographic or demographic predicament. Age cohort and generational cohort (Gen Y and Gen Z) of young consumers are studied for individualization and customization.

Design/methodology/approach

Age cohorts (Gen Z and Gen Y customers) have their unique needs. Both Gen Y (1981-1995) and Gen Z (post-1995) belong to the young consumer segment in the age group of 20-30 years but their generational cohorts are different. Strategic marketing advocates both generational marketing based on age cohorts and segmented marketing for young consumers. Strategic marketing faces cross-road between youth segmentation and generational cohort (Gen Z and Gen Y) due to intersection between the two during the 20-30 age group. Primary data using the ecological conscious consumer behavior (ECCB) scale was collected and analyzed for understanding the individual and relative importance of psychographic and demographic factors in influencing green behavior. The traditional youth segment is sliced into four sub-groups (Young Nest 1-4), and their interaction effect with post hoc analysis was done for the identification of sources of difference between different age cohorts. The findings of the study were compared with previous studies and unique contributions of this study were identified.

Findings

The findings indicate multiple niche young segments with demographic as the primary criterion and psychographic as the building block. Niche level and individual level segments emerge due to the interaction of various factors within a given age cohort. The findings confirm the identity development process which considered age as an important factor that affects varying choices throughout life from adolescence to adulthood.

Practical implications

The findings of this study may be used for effective targeting and positioning strategy of green marketing. In the time of analytics, age cohorts and generational cohort of young consumers can be approached differently for yielding better environmental results. The magnified niche level segmentation of young consumers may be used to develop individualized and customized promotions for young customers in Young Nest 1-4 for an enhanced ECCB.

Originality/value

Previous studies have focused more on consumer characteristics (demographic or psychographic) and their relative importance but niche level segmentation within given demographic segment was not attempted before. This study is unique in offering microscopic analysis of age cohorts of young consumers (Young Nest 1-4) and their interaction with other demographic variables (gender and income) for niche level segmentation.

Details

South Asian Journal of Business Studies, vol. 6 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-628X

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Book part
Publication date: 16 December 2003

Terry Nichols Clark

To subscribe: All commands must be sent to LISTSERV@EMAIL.RUTGERS.EDULots of enthusiasm is emerging among Comurbanists for urban biking, so I have to pass on a new table I

Abstract

To subscribe: All commands must be sent to LISTSERV@EMAIL.RUTGERS.EDULots of enthusiasm is emerging among Comurbanists for urban biking, so I have to pass on a new table I am refining on amenities in cities (county data shown here). It shows that NYC, LA and some other urban locations rank very high nationally, and above many suburban and smaller population counties, even in bike events (for mountain and road bikes).

Details

The City as an Entertainment Machine
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-060-9

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1984

Michael Koenig

Fiber optics has the capability to dramatically increase telecommunications capability and lower costs. This article examines fiber optic technology, explains some of the…

Abstract

Fiber optics has the capability to dramatically increase telecommunications capability and lower costs. This article examines fiber optic technology, explains some of the key terminology, and speculates about the way fiber optics will change our world.

Details

Library Hi Tech, vol. 2 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0737-8831

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 1937

Under this heading are published regularly abstracts of all Reports and Memoranda of the Aeronautical Research Committee, Reports and Technical Notes of the U.S. National…

Abstract

Under this heading are published regularly abstracts of all Reports and Memoranda of the Aeronautical Research Committee, Reports and Technical Notes of the U.S. National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics and publications of other similar research bodies as issued

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 9 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2006

Joseph Voros

The purpose of this article is to examine the nature and type of methods used in futures studies and foresight work which are explicitly concerned with creating “forward

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this article is to examine the nature and type of methods used in futures studies and foresight work which are explicitly concerned with creating “forward views” and/or “images of the future” (“prospective” methods).

Design/methodology/approach

A new analytical technique, “mode‐level analysis”, is introduced and described, based on a classification of “modes” of futures thinking and levels of “depth” of interpretive frameworks. By choosing both a set of thinking modes and a series of interpretive levels as a basis, prospective methods may be analyzed in terms of which mode(s) and what level(s) they operate with or at.

Findings

Two modes of thinking and five levels of depth are chosen for this analysis. The resulting schema is used to classify such methods as: wildcards, forecasting, “trend breaks”, visioning, backcasting, and alternative histories and counterfactuals. An analysis is also carried out on the method of “scenarios”, revealing a variety of different approaches operating at multiple levels of depth. The historical development of prospective methods is also discussed.

Practical implications

Mode‐level analysis can be generalized to any number of modes or levels, depending on the application, context or objectives of the analyst. It may be used by academics for interest's sake and for teaching students, and by practitioners as both a design tool and a diagnostic one.

Originality/value

This paper introduces a new technique for classifying prospective methods, and may help lead to ideas for the creation of new methods.

Details

Foresight, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6689

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1989

William M. Fox

Nominal Group Technique (NGT) minimises many problems associatedwith conventional interactive group problem solving; however, its verbalinputting feature is unnecessarily…

Abstract

Nominal Group Technique (NGT) minimises many problems associated with conventional interactive group problem solving; however, its verbal inputting feature is unnecessarily limiting. By utilising cards, the Improved Nominal Group Technique (INGT) assures contributor anonymity, adds productive pre‐meeting activity and removes NGT′s inputting‐transcribing bottleneck. INGT is appropriate for identifying and evaluating options, positions or problems, solving a problem, and for reviewing and refining written proposals or other documents.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

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Article
Publication date: 14 October 2005

Jenny Collins

This article draws on my doctoral research into the expansion of the Catholic educational mission in New Zealand in the years from 1945 to 1965. The project utilised…

Abstract

This article draws on my doctoral research into the expansion of the Catholic educational mission in New Zealand in the years from 1945 to 1965. The project utilised archival and documentary sources and interviews with thirty three Catholic educators: twenty one female religious from the Sisters of Mercy, Dominican Sisters and the Religious of the Sacred Heart and twelve male religious from the Marist Brothers, Christian Brothers and the Society of Mary (Marist Priests) and two former diocesan directors of Catholic education.

Details

History of Education Review, vol. 34 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0819-8691

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Article
Publication date: 9 November 2015

Peter Jones, Daphne Comfort and David Hillier

The purpose of this paper is to provide a brief for property occupiers who look to monitor trends in sustainability reporting. The paper offers a preliminary examination…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide a brief for property occupiers who look to monitor trends in sustainability reporting. The paper offers a preliminary examination of the extent to which the UK’s leading commercial property companies are embracing the concept of materiality and commissioning independent external assurance as a part of their sustainability reporting processes and some wider reflections on materiality and external assurance in sustainability reporting.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper begins with a review of the characteristics of materiality and external assurance and an outline of the drivers for, and challenges to, sustainability for property companies. The information on which the paper is based is drawn from the leading UK property companies’ corporate websites.

Findings

The paper reveals that approximately half of the UK’s leading property companies had embraced materiality or commissioned some form of independent external assurance as an integral part of their sustainability reporting processes. In many ways, this reduces the reliability and credibility of the leading property companies’ sustainability reports. Looking to the future, growing stakeholder pressure may persuade more of the UK’s leading property companies to embrace materiality and commission external assurance as systematic and integral elements in the sustainability reporting process.

Originality/value

The paper provides an accessible review of the current status of materiality and external assurance among the UK’s leading commercial property companies’ sustainability reporting. As such, it will not only interest occupiers but also professionals, practitioners, academics and students interested in sustainability in the property industry.

Details

Journal of Corporate Real Estate, vol. 17 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-001X

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Article
Publication date: 19 October 2015

Peter Jones, Daphne Comfort and David Hillier

The purpose of this paper is to provide a preliminary examination of the extent to which the UK’s leading house builders are embracing the concept of materiality and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide a preliminary examination of the extent to which the UK’s leading house builders are embracing the concept of materiality and commissioning independent external assurance as part of their sustainability reporting processes and to offer some wider reflections on materiality and external assurance in sustainability reporting.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper begins with a review of the characteristics of materiality and external assurance and a brief outline of house building in the UK and of the sustainability challenges the industry faces. The information on which the paper is based is drawn for the top twenty UK house builders’ corporate Websites.

Findings

The paper reveals that only a minority of the UK’s top 20 house builders had embraced materiality or commissioned some form of independent external assurance or verification as an integral part of their sustainability reporting processes. In many ways this reduces the reliability and credibility of the house builders’ sustainability reports. Looking to the future growing stakeholder pressure may force the UK’s house builders to embrace materiality and commission external assurance as systematic and integral elements in the sustainability reporting process.

Originality/value

The paper provides an accessible review of the current status of materiality and external assurance in the UK house builders’ sustainability reporting process, and as such it will interest professionals, practitioners, academics and students interested in sustainability in the construction industry.

Details

Property Management, vol. 33 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-7472

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