Search results

1 – 10 of 21
Content available
Article
Publication date: 21 August 2017

Ravi Pappu and George Christodoulides

1611

Abstract

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 26 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

Article
Publication date: 19 December 2022

Usha L. Pappu, Peter T.L. Popkowski Leszczyc, Ravi Pappu and Neal M. Ashkanasy

This research aims to examine the conditions under which individuals’ olfaction is actively engaged in purchase decisions. Consequently, it introduces the concept of need for…

Abstract

Purpose

This research aims to examine the conditions under which individuals’ olfaction is actively engaged in purchase decisions. Consequently, it introduces the concept of need for smell (NFS) to measure differential motivation for the extraction and use of odor information in buying contexts. A ten-item NFS scale was developed that consists of hedonic and utilitarian dimensions.

Design/methodology/approach

The scale’s dimensionality and construct validity were examined in five studies. The moderating role of NFS and the mediating role of emotions in the relationship between odor perception and consumer responses were examined. The data were analyzed using confirmatory factor analyses and customized PROCESS models.

Findings

The results show that NFS is a two-dimensional construct. The results further support the scale’s internal structure as well as its reliability, convergent, discriminant and nomological validity. NFS moderates the relationship between odor perception and consumer responses, and emotions mediate this relationship. While hedonic NFS strengthens the impact of odor perception on consumer responses, utilitarian NFS weakens this effect.

Research limitations/implications

The present research extends Krishna’s sensory marketing framework, De Luca and Botelho’s scent research framework and Herz et al.’s scent benefits framework, by introducing the concept of NFS into these frameworks. The study demonstrates the relevance and functionality of NFS construct and NFS scale. The study extends the consumer scent research by introducing NFS and illustrating the interplay of odor perception and NFS on consumer responses to scent stimuli.

Practical implications

The NFS scale used in this study adds to the genre of individual difference scales such as need for cognition and need for touch. Given its smell-specific focus, it has applications in a range of consumption contexts. Using NFS, marketers could effectively identify low and high hedonic and utilitarian NFS consumers and position product or ambient scents to serve these segments better. The NFS scale also has implications for the areas of product and service design and development, consumer information search, brand judgments and choice preferences in both scented and non-scented environments.

Originality/value

This work is one of the first attempts, to the best of the authors’ knowledge, to explain motivational differences in active engagement of olfaction, especially in purchase decisions. As a critical step in exploring olfactory information processing, the study demonstrates the relevance and functionality of NFS construct and NFS scale. The study extends the consumer scent research by introducing NFS and illustrating the interplay of odor perception and NFS on consumer responses to scent stimuli.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 57 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 July 2023

T. Bettina Cornwell, Ravi Pappu and Eric Setten

The purpose of this paper is to better understand how consumers perceive and process danger in American football and why they continue to enjoy watching the sport given society’s…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to better understand how consumers perceive and process danger in American football and why they continue to enjoy watching the sport given society’s increased understanding of the danger to the athletes.

Design/methodology/approach

Two studies, one lab study with eye-tracking (N = 152) and one survey study (N = 444), were conducted. Study 1 examines how the perception of danger associated with football mediates the relationship between exposure to violent or nonviolent video clips and enjoyment of watching video clips. Study 2 examines how device type and screen resolution influence perceptions of danger associated with football.

Findings

Findings support the role that perceived danger plays in sport viewing enjoyment. The results are in keeping with reversal theory where individuals have a protective frame that allows them to experience negative emotions (e.g. anxiety) as positive (e.g. excitement). The research also shows that for larger devices, the perception of danger associated with football is significantly influenced by high resolution.

Social implications

The work, through considering the way consumers experience sport, questions societal tolerance for entertainment that is dangerous to sport participants.

Originality/value

The findings of this work corroborate past research that has found that consumers of sport do enjoy danger for athletes in their viewing experience. Reversal theory is utilized to explain how negative emotions are experienced as positive. The work extends past findings by showing that the characteristics of the device used (large size and high resolution) during sport viewing influence perceptions of danger.

Details

International Journal of Sports Marketing and Sponsorship, vol. 24 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1464-6668

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 31 October 2008

Ravi Pappu and Pascale G. Quester

The purpose of this paper is to examine whether retailer brand equity levels vary between department store and specialty clothing store categories.

5980

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine whether retailer brand equity levels vary between department store and specialty clothing store categories.

Design/methodology/approach

Retailer brand equity is conceptualized in this paper as a four‐dimensional construct comprising retailer awareness, retailer associations, retailer perceived quality and retailer loyalty. Categorization theory is used to explain the differences in retailer equity across the two different store categories. A doubly multivariate design is incorporated in a structured questionnaire used to collect data via mall‐intercepts in an Australian state capital city.

Findings

Results suggest that retailer brand equity varies significantly between department store and specialty store categories. Department store brands yielded significantly higher ratings for all the retailer brand equity dimensions than specialty store brands.

Originality/value

Researchers have argued that retailers possess brand equity. However, extant research does not provide any specific guidance in relation to the question of whether retailer brand equity levels vary from one store category to another. The present research fills an important gap by demonstrating that retailer brand equity levels vary significantly between department store and specialty clothing store categories.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 17 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 May 2005

Ravi Pappu, Pascale G. Quester and Ray W. Cooksey

The present research aims to improve the measurement of consumer‐based brand equity. Current measurement of consumer‐based brand equity suffers from limitations, including: a lack…

37615

Abstract

Purpose

The present research aims to improve the measurement of consumer‐based brand equity. Current measurement of consumer‐based brand equity suffers from limitations, including: a lack of distinction between the dimensions brand awareness and brand associations, the use of non‐discriminant indicators in the measurement scales and of student samples.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on the recommendations of extant research, the scale constructed to measure consumer‐based brand equity in this study included brand personality measures. Brand associations were measured using a different set of items. Unlike many of the previous studies that had used student samples, the present study used a sample of actual consumers from an Australian state capital city. Confirmatory factor analysis employing structural equations modelling was used to measure consumer‐based brand equity in two product categories and across six brands.

Findings

Results support the hypothesised four‐dimension model of consumer‐based brand equity across two product categories and six brands. Brand awareness and brand associations were found to be two distinct dimensions of brand equity as conceptualised in the marketing literature. The present study contributes to the understanding of consumer‐based brand equity measurement by examining the dimensionality of this construct.

Originality/value

The principal contribution of the present research is that it provides empirical evidence of the multidimensionality of consumer‐based brand equity, supporting Aaker's and Keller's conceptualisation of brand equity. The present research also enriched consumer‐based brand equity measurement by incorporating the brand personality measures, as recommended by previous researchers. While earlier studies were conducted using US and Korean samples, the present study also used a sample of Australian consumers.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 14 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 February 2016

Ravi Pappu and Pascale G. Quester

This paper aims to examine how consumers’ perceptions of innovativeness affect an important brand performance metric: consumer brand loyalty. Specifically, the mediating role of…

16353

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine how consumers’ perceptions of innovativeness affect an important brand performance metric: consumer brand loyalty. Specifically, the mediating role of perceived quality in this relationship is explained using signaling theory.

Design/methodology/approach

The conceptual model was tested in two empirical studies for three global consumer electronics brands in two product categories. Data were collected using a mall-intercept approach from consumers at a major shopping precinct in a metropolitan city. The data were analyzed using structural equation modeling.

Findings

The results provide compelling evidence for the proposed mediation relationship. Study 1 shows that perceived quality fully transmits the impact of brand innovativeness on to brand loyalty. Study 2 confirms this mediation relationship.

Practical implications

The results can help product managers in their brand management and promotion of new products.

Originality/value

Emerging research on consumer-level effects of innovativeness provides conflicting advice regarding how consumers’ perceptions of brand innovativeness affect intangible assets such as loyalty toward the brand. The present research reconciles contradictory findings in the literature by uncovering a different route through which consumer perceptions of brand innovativeness affect a key brand performance metric: brand loyalty. Specifically, the present study fills an important knowledge gap in the innovativeness literature and deepens our understanding of the relationship between brand innovativeness and brand loyalty by empirically examining and confirming the role of a hereto overlooked intervening variable, perceived quality.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 50 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 31 May 2011

Amanda Spry, Ravi Pappu and T. Bettina Cornwell

This research aims to examine the impact of celebrity credibility on consumer‐based equity of the endorsed brand. The mediating role of brand credibility and the moderating role…

80299

Abstract

Purpose

This research aims to examine the impact of celebrity credibility on consumer‐based equity of the endorsed brand. The mediating role of brand credibility and the moderating role of the type of branding (parent versus sub‐brand) employed by the endorsed brand on the endorser credibility‐brand equity relationship are also to be examined. The endorser credibility‐brand equity relationship was developed using associative learning principles whereas the brand signalling theory is applied to examine the mediating role of brand credibility.

Design/methodology/approach

The conceptual framework was tested using a field experiment. Data were collected using a mall‐intercept approach at a shopping centre from a sample of consumers in a metropolitan Australian city. The data were analysed using structural equation modelling.

Findings

Results suggest endorser credibility has an indirect impact on brand equity when this relationship is mediated by brand credibility. This mediating relationship was moderated by type of branding. However, the “endorser credibility‐brand credibility” and “endorser credibility‐brand equity” relationships did not vary according to the type of branding employed.

Practical implications

In support of past findings, the present study shows that a celebrity endorser should be one who is perceived as credible based on their attractiveness, expertise and trustworthiness. Moreover, in this research, even a moderately low credibility endorser proved to be able to build the brand.

Originality/value

The present study is one of the first to empirically examine and confirm the impact of endorser credibility on brand credibility and consumer‐based brand equity.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 45 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 January 2006

Ravi Pappu and Pascale Quester

The objective of the present research is to examine the relationship between consumers' satisfaction with a retailer and the equity they associate with the retail brand.

14943

Abstract

Purpose

The objective of the present research is to examine the relationship between consumers' satisfaction with a retailer and the equity they associate with the retail brand.

Design/methodology/approach

Retail brand equity is conceptualized as a four‐dimensional construct comprising: retailer awareness, retailer associations, retailer perceived quality, and retailer loyalty. Then the associative network memory model is applied from cognitive psychology to the specific context of the relationships between customer satisfaction and consumer‐based retailer equity. A survey was undertaken using a convenience sample of shopping mall consumers in an Australian state capital city. The questionnaire used to collect data included an experimental design such that two categories of retailers were included in the study: department stores and specialty stores, with three retailers representing each category. The relationship between consumer‐based retailer equity and customer satisfaction was examined using multivariate analysis of variance.

Findings

Results indicate that retail brand equity varies with customer satisfaction. For department stores, each consumer‐based retailer equity dimension varied according to customer satisfaction with the retailer. However, for specialty stores, only three of the consumer‐based retailer equity dimensions, namely retailer awareness, retailer associations and retailer perceived quality, varied according to customer satisfaction level with the retailer.

Originality/value

The principal contribution of the present research is that it demonstrates empirically a positive relationship between customer satisfaction and an intangible asset such as retailer equity.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 15 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 May 2006

Ravi Pappu, Pascale G. Quester and Ray W. Cooksey

The objective of the present research is to examine the impact of the country of origin of a brand on its consumer‐based equity.

21350

Abstract

Purpose

The objective of the present research is to examine the impact of the country of origin of a brand on its consumer‐based equity.

Design/methodology/approach

Brand equity was conceptualized in this paper as a combination of brand awareness, brand associations, perceived quality and attitudinal brand loyalty. A doubly multivariate design was incorporated in a structured questionnaire to collect data via mall intercepts in an Australian capital city.

Findings

Multivariate analysis of variance of the data indicated that consumer‐based brand equity varied according to the country of origin of the brand and product category. This impact of country of origin on brand equity occurred where consumers perceived substantive differences between the countries in terms of their product category‐country associations.

Research limitations/implications

An important direction for future research would be to examine how the consumer‐based equity of a brand would be affected, if the country of origin were changed from a country with weaker association with the product category to a country with strong association with the product category. The results would be useful to MNCs contemplating international manufacturing.

Practical implications

Marketing managers operating in the international context must identify the sources of brand equity, and understand the importance of incorporating country of origin into their brand equity measurement. Further, the results suggest that, when a brand offers a variety of product categories, brand managers should monitor and track the brand's consumer‐based equity for each product category.

Originality/value

The present study is one of the first to empirically examine and confirm the impact of country of origin on the consumer‐based equity of a brand.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 40 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 19 February 2019

Patrícia Ianelli Rocha, Jorge Henrique Caldeira de Oliveira and Janaina de Moura Engracia Giraldi

The purpose of this paper is to perform an integrative analysis, mapping the main areas of the celebrity endorsement literature of the last 20 years, offering a taxonomy of…

5508

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to perform an integrative analysis, mapping the main areas of the celebrity endorsement literature of the last 20 years, offering a taxonomy of subject subareas and a research agenda for the topic.

Design/methodology/approach

The research was divided into two stages: the first was a systematic review of literature, and the second consisted on complementary information based on the generation and analysis of the maps elaborated by the VOSviewer software based on the data collected. The searches for the data occurred between the months of January and March of 2017.

Findings

The paper provides a decentralization framework in terms of authors regarding the celebrity endorsement. The country with the largest number of research works in the area is the USA; also, the paper reveals the most cited document, also the main journals about the theme, the main keywords, the main authors and their discussions. Thereafter, the paper presents tables containing the main author’s and respective theme inside celebrity endorsement.

Research limitations/implications

One possible limitation of the research is that it was performed only in the Scopus database, and it may be suggested as future searches that other databases are included as well.

Practical implications

The results of this paper can serve as a facilitating guide for researchers and for managers that want to know more about the topic.

Originality/value

A categorization table was proposed containing the subthemes of celebrity endorsement that were discussed in the last 20 years and a list of their respective authors, including the following subjects: cultural comparison, congruence, adverse effects, efficacy and intention to purchase, marketing destinations, social media, models and reviews, multiple endorsements, social policy, values of brand/economic.

Details

Benchmarking: An International Journal, vol. 27 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-5771

Keywords

1 – 10 of 21