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Article
Publication date: 7 January 2014

Raul Katz, Pantelis Koutroumpis and Fernando Martin Callorda

The purpose of this paper is to measure the cumulative, holistic impact of discrete information and communication technologies. It also provides a glimpse of applications

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2788

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to measure the cumulative, holistic impact of discrete information and communication technologies. It also provides a glimpse of applications and service adoption, which complements more traditional perspectives such as technology penetration. This approach is utilized to measure achievements in implementing a policy such as Europe's Digital Agenda.

Design/methodology/approach

Measuring digitization should cover the transition to digitally intensive societies across multiple sets of metrics, capturing not only technology penetration, but also its use in order to understand the full impact of digitization. For this purpose, a composite index was developed based on six overarching components: affordability, infrastructure investment, network access, capacity, usage, and human capital.

Findings

These concepts were utilized to assess Europe's performance in terms of its digitization. Significant gaps were highlighted both in terms of its uneven development, but also in terms of lags in the areas of infrastructure investment and digital technology usage. The economic payback to be generated by pro-actively addressing these gaps promises to be significant.

Practical implications

From a policy standpoint, the paper raises an interesting hypothesis to be explored in the European context: while the implementation of the Digital Agenda could be tackled in an overarching continental manner, particularities in each member country digitalization might raise the need for a more differentiated approach. In particular, European countries at the transitional stage should emphasize the creation of necessary incentives to accelerate investment in telecommunications networks. Additionally, demand promotion strategies focused on digital literacy and content development appear to be a critical lever to enhancing digitization. On the other hand, the policy challenges for the advanced countries appear to cluster around investment in infrastructure and the development of human capital.

Originality/value

Previous attempts to measure the impact of ICT have focused primarily on measuring and assessing the economic effects of widespread access to either wireless or broadband technology. This approach puts additional emphasis on two dimensions: cumulative impact of information and communication technologies and usage.

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Article
Publication date: 3 May 2013

Raul L. Katz, Pantelis Koutroumpis and Fernando Callorda

Digitization is defined as the social transformation triggered by the massive adoption of digital technologies to generate, process, share and transact information. This

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2432

Abstract

Purpose

Digitization is defined as the social transformation triggered by the massive adoption of digital technologies to generate, process, share and transact information. This paper seeks to present a methodology followed to calculate the Digitization Index, a concept originally developed by Booz & Company, the global management consulting firm, with the support of the authors.

Design/methodology/approach

This index consists of six elements capturing Ubiquity, Affordability, Reliability, Speed, Usability and Skill and 24 sub‐indicators measuring tangible parameters of perceived digitization metrics.

Findings

The index indicates that countries are clustered as Digitally Constrained, Emerging, Transitional or Advanced, with varying degrees of contribution of digitization to economic growth. The Index is used to assess the situation of Latin American countries in terms of their progression to digitally advanced societies. In this context, the areas to focus on in the formulation of Latin America digital agenda are outlined.

Originality/value

Until now, most indices that measure progress towards this new era have focused primarily on metrics such as wireless telephony penetration, access to the internet and broadband adoption. The paper argues that these indices, even those that are more comprehensive in scope (Network Readiness Index by the World Economic Forum, or the Digital Opportunity Index by the International Telecommunication Union) capture only a portion of the ongoing transformations.

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Article
Publication date: 4 May 2010

Rob Docters, Raul Katz, Jerry Bernstein and Bert Schefers

This paper aims to describe best practice in pricing strategy for new products and services being introduced to a market.

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2981

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to describe best practice in pricing strategy for new products and services being introduced to a market.

Design/methodology/approach

A review of introductory pricing patterns across a number of industries shows there are some common patterns in customer evaluation of new products and services. Study of customer behavior can be closely tracked where there is an ongoing relationship with the buyer, e.g. online services, software as a service, professional or technical services, consumables, consumer products and sometimes capital items with service suites and warranties (e.g. medical devices). The means for inferring and tracking customer understanding, beliefs and values is to quantify usage patterns, service call‐ins, warranty requirements and trade‐out of the new product/service for newer products and services.

Findings

This article examines customer behaviors to suggest that there are three phases to customer product or service adoption: a “learning” phase, where the customer or potential customer (in trial) learns about the products, its attributes, features, utility and value; a “use” phase where the customer has learned how to use the service or product, and is appreciating the value of the product, and using a lot; and a “reassessment” phase. Now the customer is very familiar with the product, the novelty and mystery has worn off, and they wonder if there is an equivalent substitute available for a lower cost.

Originality/value

A bad introductory pricing strategy can destroy price levels and destroy a market, not to mention cost a company a lot of money. For some years many new product/service sponsors believed the best pricing approach for new products and services was to offer it for free. This paper shows that this simple approach is both ineffective and impracticable for most companies. The better approach is to understand customer product adoption cycles, and link the introductory pricing strategy to customer understanding and behavior.

Details

Journal of Business Strategy, vol. 31 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0275-6668

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 7 January 2014

Luciano Morganti and Karen Donders

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388

Abstract

Details

info, vol. 16 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6697

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2001

Lee W. McKnight

Contends the Internet is a medium for commerce, marketing, advertising and distribution, as well as invention, entertainment and discussion. Reckons that on the Internet…

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1527

Abstract

Contends the Internet is a medium for commerce, marketing, advertising and distribution, as well as invention, entertainment and discussion. Reckons that on the Internet there is only on certainty – when creative destruction reigns it is business as usual. Concludes that succeeding in the global Internet economy is very difficult, and survival is far from assured.

Details

info, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6697

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 2003

Annalee C Babb

For the 15 member states of the Caribbean Community (Caricom) to join and to introduce a measure of equity to the emergent global information society, they must be able to…

Abstract

For the 15 member states of the Caribbean Community (Caricom) to join and to introduce a measure of equity to the emergent global information society, they must be able to manage and exploit digital communication networks, technologies, products and services in ways that nurture and advance Caribbean knowledge, culture and development. This requires a type of digital access to the new telecommunication infrastructures these small developing countries as yet have been unable to attain. As a consequence, this paper develops a six‐layered model of societal access that includes physical, financial, cognitive, secure, administrative and operational components, and argues that in the absence of all of these layers functioning together, less advanced economies like those in the Caricom grouping cannot begin to build local innovation, foster knowledge creation and advocate increased equity in the evolving networked society.

Details

Journal of Information, Communication and Ethics in Society, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-996X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 28 June 2011

Robert Kenny and Charles Kenny

Governments around the world are providing multi‐billion dollar subsidies to roll out fiber to the home (FTTH) to enable superfast broadband (50 Mbps and above). The

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1820

Abstract

Purpose

Governments around the world are providing multi‐billion dollar subsidies to roll out fiber to the home (FTTH) to enable superfast broadband (50 Mbps and above). The premise for this is a belief that superfast broadband brings substantial economic and societal benefits. This paper's purpose is to examine whether this belief is well founded.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors critically review the arguments most commonly made in favor of FTTH, examining their logic and underlying evidence.

Findings

The paper finds that these arguments often inappropriately use benefits of basic broadband to make the case for the upgrade to superfast broadband, or use the benefits of providing superfast to business premises to argue for providing superfast to homes. The authors find the evidence that basic broadband brings economic growth is patchy, and that frequently studies that argue for a link do not adequately distinguish between correlation and causation.

Originality/value

Thus the authors conclude that the conventional wisdom that FTTH will bring substantial economic and societal benefits and therefore deserves a subsidy is, at best, much overstated. The case has simply not been made that FTTH has sufficient incremental externalities over other forms of broadband. This is an important conclusion for politicians, policy makers, telecoms providers and taxpayers, and suggests that billions of dollars of public money may be being wasted.

Details

info, vol. 13 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6697

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 15 April 2020

Beatriz Víllora, Santiago Yubero and Raul Navarro

Previous research has documented a negative association between subjective well-being and different forms of victimization. The present study aims to examine differences…

Abstract

Purpose

Previous research has documented a negative association between subjective well-being and different forms of victimization. The present study aims to examine differences in well-being among university student victims of cyber dating abuse and bullying after controlling for acceptance of dating violence.

Design/methodology

This a cross-sectional study involving 1,657 Spanish university students (62.1% females, 37.1% males) using a quantitative approach.

Findings

The multiple regression analysis results showed that the university students who reported low bullying victimization and low acceptance of dating violence also reported higher emotional, social and psychological well-being, although the association between bullying and well-being was weak. No relationship was found between cyber dating abuse victimization and the well-being dimensions examined (emotional, social and psychological). Indeed, the participants not involved in any form of abuse and the cyber dating abuse victims presented the highest level of emotional, social and psychological well-being compared to the bullying victims and the combined victims.

Practical implications

Prevention and intervention programs need to specifically address bullying and cyber dating abusive in university, with a special focus on normative beliefs about both types of victimization and offering different sources of support to overcome negative consequences on mental health.

Originality/value

This paper analyzes the subjective well-being correlates simultaneously in victims of cyber dating abuse and bullying among university students without assuming that every form of victimization has the same mental health outcomes.

Details

Information Technology & People, vol. 34 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2000

Raul H. Godinez and Brian H. Kleiner

Considers the changing demographics in the USA, the glass ceiling, issues in employment and affirmative action issues. Uses the aerospace industry as a case study with…

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602

Abstract

Considers the changing demographics in the USA, the glass ceiling, issues in employment and affirmative action issues. Uses the aerospace industry as a case study with examples of discrimination claims and their outcomes. Provides brief recommendations from these findings.

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Equal Opportunities International, vol. 19 no. 6/7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0261-0159

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Article
Publication date: 7 October 2019

Michelle VanNatta

As the US criminal justice system and immigration system increasingly interconnect, even immigration policy that is facially race-neutral may involve biased practices. The…

Abstract

Purpose

As the US criminal justice system and immigration system increasingly interconnect, even immigration policy that is facially race-neutral may involve biased practices. The purpose of this paper is to examine how institutional racism in criminal legal processes creates particular barriers for many individuals of Latin American and/or African descent facing deportation proceedings in US immigration courts, particularly in assertions regarding gang affiliation.

Design/methodology/approach

This research is based on ethnographic observation. The work utilized a grounded theory approach. The observation took place at public master calendar hearings at a Midwestern immigration court between 2013 and 2015, yielding over 400 pages of fieldnotes that were coded and analyzed for patterns.

Findings

Non-citizens in the USA, including lawful permanent residents, are subject to deportation if labeled “criminal.” Racial profiling and criminalization of communities of color create heightened risk of deportation. Assumptions that common tattoos or urban fashion indicate criminality, reliance on Facebook posts to “prove” gang membership, and the use of arrest records as evidence of criminality even if charges were dropped all put immigrants of Latin American and/or African descent at heightened risk.

Research limitations/implications

The ethnographic method used has strong validity but weaker reliability and generalizability.

Practical implications

This paper can help analysts, policymakers and advocates consider how to adapt systems to increase equity.

Originality/value

This research provides direct examples and ethnographic evidence of how race and cultural bias in criminal legal processes and immigration policies can affect people in deportation proceedings.

Details

Safer Communities, vol. 18 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-8043

Keywords

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