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Book part

Enes Gök and Sedat Gümüş

Higher education institutions around the world compete with one another in the internationalization zone. One of the biggest competitions centers on the mobility of…

Abstract

Higher education institutions around the world compete with one another in the internationalization zone. One of the biggest competitions centers on the mobility of students fighting for the share from the student market pie. The Turkish higher education system, as an emerging competitor, also participates in this competition. While many studies focus on international students in Turkish higher education institutions, the literature lacks information about why Turkish institutions participate in this game, and what tools and strategies they use in this endeavor. This study examined the rationales and strategies of higher education institutions using a semistructured online survey data collected from international offices at participating institutions. Findings revealed that Turkish higher education institutions attract international students to create a multicultural environment by increasing diversity at the campus and to increase the quality of the institution. In contrast to the findings in the literature, seeing international students as institutional revenue source was not among the rationales mentioned by the participant institutions. Besides the rationales, findings also revealed the strategies institutions use for their international student recruitment. Paralleling with the trending mechanisms used worldwide, Turkish institutions use similar strategies such as participating in fairs and events, advertisement through technology, web and social media, and using agents; however, there are also unique mechanisms created by Turkish institutions including visiting parents of current international students, high school visits, and summer camps as effective strategies. Additional research, with broader scope and depth is needed to better understand the internationalization of Turkish higher education.

Details

Annual Review of Comparative and International Education 2017
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-765-4

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Article

Maria João Santos and Cristina Silva Bastos

Two years on from the launch of the United Nations 2030 agenda, this study aims to approach just how and why large Portuguese companies are incorporating the sustainable…

Abstract

Purpose

Two years on from the launch of the United Nations 2030 agenda, this study aims to approach just how and why large Portuguese companies are incorporating the sustainable development goals (SDGs) into their strategies. This sets out a theoretical framework for priority levels of management and the key rationales and motivations towards the adoption of the SDGs by companies within the scope of identifying logical and mutual connections.

Design/methodology/approach

The proposed theoretical framework applied an empirical, qualitative study approach, deploying content analysis of the semi-structured interviews carried out.

Findings

The results convey how the responding companies are using the different management models identified for integrating the SDGs, with the strategic and operational facets of greatest relevance. There are various key reasons put forward in justification of this involvement, in particular highlighting the understanding of the 2030 agenda as an ethical and social contract followed by concerns over managing stakeholders. The results demonstrate that these main motivations influence the management level at which the SGDs undergo integration, yet they do not determine the type of integration.

Research limitations/implications

The analysis of a limited number of companies and the fact that the semi-structured interviews were made with a single representative, which correspondingly reflects how the responses received convey the understandings, visions, values and responsibilities of these interlocutors.

Originality/value

This provides one of the first studies contributing towards understanding how and why businesses are aligning with the SDGs. At the conceptual level, this proposes a theoretical framework for analysing the underlying logics and the levels of integration into business management and how both can be interconnected. In practical terms, this clarifies how business management strategies may leverage the integration of the 2030 agenda as a mechanism for implementing corporate sustainability.

Details

Social Responsibility Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-1117

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Book part

Julianne C. Turner

I address the question, Is theory useful when collaborating with teachers to improve student engagement?

Abstract

Purpose

I address the question, Is theory useful when collaborating with teachers to improve student engagement?

Design/methodology

We based our work on four principles of motivation drawn from the research literature: students are more likely to engage in learning if teachers support their perceptions of competence, autonomy, belongingness, and make learning meaningful. To bridge the gap between theory and practice, we suggested that teachers use certain instructional strategies, like open-ended questions, related to supporting student engagement. These strategies were both more complex than the standard practices and more challenging to implement, given the current U.S. emphasis on standardized testing. In two longitudinal studies, we provided rationales for engagement principles and instructional strategies related to student engagement and encouraged teachers to use new practices. Mixed methodology included online observation measures and video of classroom instruction, retrospective interviews with teachers, and student interviews and experience sampling self-reports.

Findings

Short case studies of teachers change illustrate the examples of implementation. In both studies, about half the teachers made significant instructional changes, which were related both to teacher perceptions of student engagement and to student self-reports.

Originality/value

Insights gained from the studies may offer researchers practical information about how to work with teachers to improve engagement in the classroom. They include whether teachers can understand abstract motivation terminology, consider students’ “basic needs” when planning instruction, and implement strategies so that they are likely to support student engagement. Other learnings include the strong impact of teacher culture on change efforts and the need to consider teachers’ “basic needs” if we are to support them in instructional change. Long-term collaboration and establishing mutual trust may be the best way for both researchers and teachers to develop common understandings for supporting student motivation in the classroom.

Details

Motivational Interventions
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-555-5

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Article

Rebecca Eliahoo

This qualitative study explores the barriers and dilemmas faced by beginning and novice mentors in post-compulsory education in the Southeast of England. It analyses…

Abstract

Purpose

This qualitative study explores the barriers and dilemmas faced by beginning and novice mentors in post-compulsory education in the Southeast of England. It analyses critical incidents (Tripp, 2012) taken from the everyday practice of mentors who were supporting new teachers and lecturers in the Southeast of England. It categorises different types of critical incidents that mentors encountered and describes the strategies and rationales mentors used to support mentees and (indirectly) their learners and colleagues. The purpose of this paper is to explore ways in which mentors’ own values, beliefs and life experiences affected their mentoring practice.

Design/methodology/approach

As part of a specialist master’s-level professional development module, 21 mentors wrote about two critical incidents (Tripp, 2012) taken from their own professional experiences, which aimed to demonstrate their support for their mentee’s range of complex needs. These critical incidents were written up as short case studies, which justified the rationale for their interventions and demonstrated the mentors’ own professional development in mentoring. Critical incidents were used as units of analysis and categorised thematically by topic, sector and mentoring strategies used.

Findings

The research demonstrated the complex nature of decision making and the potential for professional learning within a mentoring dyad. The study of these critical incidents found that mentors most frequently cited the controversial nature of teaching observations, the mentor’s role in mediating professional relationships, the importance of inculcating professional dispositions in education and the need to support new teachers so that they can use effective behaviour management strategies.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the understanding of the central importance of mentoring for professional growth within teacher education. It identifies common dilemmas that novice mentors face in post-compulsory education, justifies the rationale for their interventions and mentoring strategies and helps to identify ways in which mentors’ professional development needs can be met. It demonstrates that mentoring is complex, non-linear and mediated by mentors’ motivation and values.

Details

International Journal of Mentoring and Coaching in Education, vol. 5 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-6854

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Article

Steven H. Appelbaum, Andrea Everard and Loretta T. S. Hung

Aims to review the literature pertaining to downsizing with an emphasis on the organization level, and establish the critical success factors of downsizing, that is…

Abstract

Aims to review the literature pertaining to downsizing with an emphasis on the organization level, and establish the critical success factors of downsizing, that is, guidelines to the successful implementation of downsizing activities. Addresses these objectives by examining first, how downsizing is defined in the literature reviewed, then discusses the different ways in which or measures by which organizations carry out downsizing activities and the reasons that prompt companies to downsize. Addresses the rationale utilized by firms to downsize, the expected outcomes in terms of economic and human consequences, the approaches to downsizing (reorientation and convergence) and specific strategies such as workforce reduction, work redesign and systemic strategy. Also downsizing tactics, human resources as assets vs costs, planning, participation, leadership, communications, and support to victims/survivors are examined. Both laboratory experiments and empirical research concerning survivors’ reactions are explored. The role of trust as well as the human resource professional in the process are included. Conclusions and recommendations complete the article.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 37 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Article

Evelyn Chiyevo Garwe and Juliet Thondhlana

This paper contributes to knowledge on the internationalization of higher education (HE) through presenting a “lived” experience on how to optimize internationalization…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper contributes to knowledge on the internationalization of higher education (HE) through presenting a “lived” experience on how to optimize internationalization outcomes through national internationalization policy development.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper uses a case study of Zimbabwe to qualitatively chart a strategic focus to internationalization through incorporating the theory of change (ToC) approach to national (government) policy development.

Findings

The paper details the context, challenges, rationales, approaches, priorities and processes that guided IHE policy development in Zimbabwe. It underscores the importance of baseline research and benchmarking in propelling an evidence-based and participatory approach to IHE policy development.

Research limitations/implications

The methodology and framework used here makes it possible to draw comparisons in similar settings in a way that enables a more holistic understanding of the complexities and practicalities of national internationalization policy development.

Practical implications

The study can assist nations to take a strategic approach to guide institutional internationalization responses. In doing so, researchers and HE stakeholders in similar national contexts can learn valuable lessons from the study.

Social implications

Internationalization is increasingly becoming a policy imperative for HE in pursuit of quality as well as fostering sustainable national development (Craciun, 2018). Higher education institutions (HEIs) are recognized as key drivers of sustainable national and international development through the production of quality graduates with “global competencies.”

Originality/value

The study contributes to the growing research interest on strategic approaches to internationalization targeting specific national experiences.

Details

Journal of Applied Research in Higher Education, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-7003

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Article

Kirt Hainzer, Talitha Best and Philip Hugh Brown

The purpose of this paper twofold: first, to review the current state of knowledge regarding local value chain (LVC) interventions in the context of international…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper twofold: first, to review the current state of knowledge regarding local value chain (LVC) interventions in the context of international agricultural research and development; and, secondly, by synthesising the empirical findings from LVC projects, to provide guidance for future research and intervention design.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper utilises systematic review and qualitative meta-synthesis guidelines to review and synthesise recent research papers and case studies dealing specifically with the development of LVCs, authored by professionals affiliated with development agencies and international research consortiums.

Findings

The paper identifies a novel two-phase characterisation of LVC interventions. Phase 1 identifies opportunities for interventions, which are characterised as typologies and presented upon a spectrum of value chain functionality from underdeveloped to mature. Phase 2 is the selection and implementation of strategies to achieve the identified opportunities from Phase 1, and the paper characterises these strategies per the domain of value chain functionality which they target.

Research limitations/implications

The interaction between context, socio-economic constraints and intervention strategies is still a poorly understood feature of value chain interventions, and the paper posits that a greater understanding of these interactions is crucial to the success of value chain interventions.

Originality/value

The paper provides the first synthesis of LVC interventions, while outlining research priorities and knowledge gaps required to design interventions which are consummate to the context and functionality of a prioritised chain.

Details

Journal of Agribusiness in Developing and Emerging Economies, vol. 9 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-0839

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Book part

Frank Lindberg and Sabrina Seeler

The growing tensions related to overtourism and its influences, such as environmental harm to nature and residents' well-being, loss of authenticity and visitors'…

Abstract

The growing tensions related to overtourism and its influences, such as environmental harm to nature and residents' well-being, loss of authenticity and visitors' satisfaction, have triggered a rethinking of destination marketing strategies. Many destinations consider stricter measures to cope with this situation. Among others, demarketing initiatives, which aim at discouraging demand, are discussed as an alternative strategic orientation. Demarketing is not a new concept, but in complex tourism destinations with many attractions, stakeholders and tourists, its potential remains mostly unexplored. This chapter presents findings from two tourism destinations: one on a national scale, New Zealand, and one on a regional scale, the Lofoten Islands, Norway. Our results show that destination demarketing mix strategies are emphasised by both destinations. In an overtourism situation, it is surprising that general demarketing has limited relevance. Instead, we find evidence for a mix of mainly selective demarketing, but also synchromarketing initiatives (redistributing demand spatially and temporally) and counter-marketing efforts (tourists' code of conduct). Decisions related to the implementation of a demarketing mix depend not only on destination management in general, but also on long-term, sustainability-oriented and dynamic processes where stakeholders negotiate how they can adjust visitor demands. We refer to such strategic work as ‘Stakeholder Integrated Demarketing Approach’ (SIDA). The chapter provides an original contribution to tourism academia and practices while opening avenues for future research, particularly with reference to a demarketing mix strategy and the feasibility of SIDA in times when demarketing could develop as a tool to mitigate overtourism.

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Article

Arturo Z. Vasquez‐Parraga, Reto Felix and Aberdeen Leila Borders

Foreign direct investment by Latin American companies in the USA is growing and significant. Yet, the characteristics of and trends in these investments, and the strategies

Abstract

Foreign direct investment by Latin American companies in the USA is growing and significant. Yet, the characteristics of and trends in these investments, and the strategies used by these companies to either enter or exit the USA as well as to maintain their presence are little understood. This paper explores and illustrates the entry, maintenance, and exit strategies exemplary companies from Latin America use when they become involved in US markets. A sample of Mexican companies that concentrate in manufacturing industrial goods and prefer partnerships as the entry mode to US markets is used. In addition, this paper describes the patterns of direct investment, asset ownership, gross product, and intra‐firm B‐to‐B trade of Latin American companies in the USA.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 19 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

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Article

W. Stewart Howe and Graeme Martin

Western business schools currently face a number of pressures to internationalise their postgraduate course provision in terms both of content and place of delivery. In…

Abstract

Western business schools currently face a number of pressures to internationalise their postgraduate course provision in terms both of content and place of delivery. In doing so they are faced with decisions concerning their motivations, the broad strategies to adopt, the nature of collaborative links with host‐country institutions, and a number of practical matters. The literature suggests that many of such issues have now broadly become clearly identified, and that a general “model” of postgraduate management course internationalisation may have begun to emerge. In this article a survey of the literature is followed by a case study of the internationalisation experience of a small UK university business school. It reports on the extent to which its experience supports the model and highlights other issues. The conclusion of the analysis is that an emergent strategy in this respect, not necessarily following a clear stages model, has nonetheless been largely successful.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 17 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

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