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Article
Publication date: 26 July 2012

Laxmi Prasad Pant, Helen Hambly-Odame, Andy Hall and Rasheed Sulaiman V.

Despite favourable agro-ecological conditions and being the largest international mango producer, India still struggles to build competence in sustainable mango production…

Abstract

Purpose

Despite favourable agro-ecological conditions and being the largest international mango producer, India still struggles to build competence in sustainable mango production and post-harvest. The purpose of this paper is to contribute to the literature on innovation capacity development, and to explore aspects of innovation systems ideas in the analysis of mango production and marketing by small-scale farmers in the South Indian state of Andhra Pradesh.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper uses case study research methods to an analysis of the sector ' s recent history combined with an empirical account of systems thinking on integrating technology supply chains and commodity supply chains.

Findings

Findings suggest that the case of mango production and post-harvest in the Krishna district is a dismal one and the remedial actions to strengthen mango innovation systems in the district relate to aspects of capacity development to promote upward spiral of learning and innovation, and involve multistakeholder processes to integrate the supply chains of technologyand commodity.

Originality/value

This paper, with its aim to contribute to the literature on innovation capacity development, brings together conventionally distinct bodies of literature on strengthening innovation systems and developing stakeholder capacity. The value of this paper lies on how it addresses technology supply and commodity supply issues in the analysis of competence challenges to strengthening mango innovation systems performance.

Details

World Journal of Science, Technology and Sustainable Development, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-5945

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Article
Publication date: 20 May 2020

Muhammad Bilal Zafar and Ahmad Azam Sulaiman

This paper begins with a challenge to explore the scope and dimensions of corporate social responsibility (CSR) in Islamic banking and design a CSR disclosure index, which…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper begins with a challenge to explore the scope and dimensions of corporate social responsibility (CSR) in Islamic banking and design a CSR disclosure index, which may gauge the level of CSR disclosure in Islamic banking.

Design/methodology/approach

It adopts a two-fold approach to develop the CSR disclosure index for Islamic banking, such as “identification” and “prioritization.” In the ambit of identification, it relies on the existing literature related to CSR and Islamic banking. However, it undertakes analytical hierarchy process (AHP) method for prioritization through the sample of 104 experts related to Islamic banking of Pakistan.

Findings

It concludes the CSR index for Islamic banking contains five dimensions, including 79 items across 20 sub-dimensions. The results of AHP indicate that the CSR dimensions are important for Shariah governance, employee, community, customer and environment. Moreover, within dimensions, the most important sub-dimensions are Shariah compliance, customer service and quality, green investing/banking, customer relationship, training and development and poverty alleviation.

Practical implications

The CSR disclosure index of this study has important implications for academicians, such as it paves the ways for further investigations and practical usage of index to gauge the level CSR disclosure of Islamic banking. Moreover, it delineates the spectrum of responsibilities for managers of Islamic banking under the domain of CSR.

Originality/value

The proposed CSR disclosure index is comprehensive and stresses on the social responsibility of Islamic banking toward stakeholders. In nutshell, this study offers what is expected from the practitioners of Islamic banking in the domain of social responsibility.

Details

International Journal of Islamic and Middle Eastern Finance and Management, vol. 13 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8394

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Article
Publication date: 27 August 2021

Farida Aryani, Hillman Wirawan, Abdul Saman, Sulaiman Samad and Muhammad Jufri

This study aims at investigating the indirect effect of soft skills on career engagement through the role of psychological capital (PsyCap) in different age groups. The…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims at investigating the indirect effect of soft skills on career engagement through the role of psychological capital (PsyCap) in different age groups. The social cognitive theory (SCT) and job demands-resource model (JD-R) were employed to explain the effect of perceived skill mastery on PsyCap and career engagement.

Design/methodology/approach

The data were collected from 707 high school students, 150 university students and 165 employees using a three-wave data collection technique. This study measured soft skills, PsyCap and career engagement at different age groups (i.e. high school students, university students and employees). The data were analysed using a moderated-mediation technique.

Findings

The results showed that soft skills positively influenced PsyCap and eventually increased career engagement in all age groups. However, the effect was stronger for students (both in high school and university) than employees in the workplaces. Unlike most students, employees related soft skills to performance. Regardless of the effect on performance, students would be more likely than employees to perceive soft skill mastery as a source of efficacy.

Research limitations/implications

First, the education system should direct more attention to developing students' non-cognitive skills. Second, people should understand that their career advancement continues in the workplace context. Organizations can foster employees' soft skills by providing more opportunities to develop new skills.

Originality/value

This study sheds light on the importance of soft skills beyond academic and workplace performance. This study is among the few empirical investigations that reveal career engagement factors across different career development stages.

Details

Education + Training, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

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Article
Publication date: 14 September 2018

Ahmed A. Sarhan and Collins G. Ntim

This paper aims to investigate the level of compliance with, and disclosure of, corporate governance best practice recommendations and the firm- and country-level factors…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate the level of compliance with, and disclosure of, corporate governance best practice recommendations and the firm- and country-level factors that can explain discernible differences in the level of compliance with, and disclosure of, corporate governance best practice recommendations in a number of Middle Eastern and North African (MENA) countries.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors use the widely used content analysis technique to examine the level of compliance with, and disclosure of, corporate governance best practice recommendations in a sample of listed corporations in MENA countries. In addition, the authors use the ordinary least square multiple regression analysis technique to examine the firm- and country-level antecedents of the level of compliance with, and disclosure of, corporate governance best practice recommendations. The findings are generally robust to different types of firm- and country-level factors, alternative measures and potential endogeneity problems.

Findings

The findings of this study are two-fold. First, the level of voluntary compliance with, and disclosure of, corporate governance best practice recommendations among MENA listed corporations is low and differs substantially across firms. Second, the evidence suggests that firm- and country-level factors, including religiosity, national governance quality and macroeconomic factors, have a positive and significant impact on voluntary compliance with, and disclosure of, corporate governance best practice recommendations.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this paper is the first to examine both the potential firm- and country-level factors affecting voluntary compliance with, and disclosure of, corporate governance best practice recommendations among MENA listed corporations from a neo-institutional theoretical perspective. The results of our study provide regulators and policymakers with the impetus to encourage greater efforts towards pursuing reforms that seek to improve national governance quality, economic environment and positive religious practices.

Details

Managerial Auditing Journal, vol. 33 no. 6/7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-6902

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Case study
Publication date: 3 December 2015

Ajay Chauhan and Rabia Rasheed

The case discusses Islamic Banking Principles and Products (Banking), Business Strategy for Niche Markets (Strategic Management) and Segmentation and Marketing Strategy…

Abstract

Subject area

The case discusses Islamic Banking Principles and Products (Banking), Business Strategy for Niche Markets (Strategic Management) and Segmentation and Marketing Strategy (Marketing Management).

Study level/applicability

Undergraduate Graduate Training – Executives at junior level.

Case overview

This case is about the dilemma faced by Azhar Mehmud, a newly recruited Marketing Manager, Islamic Products (MMIP) in Bank Islam on six-month probation. Prior to Bank Islam, Azhar had an MBA degree from the UK and about 15 years of experience of business development in a multi-national bank in Indonesia. Looking at his experience, he was awarded to promote Islamic banking (IB) products in Malaysia where the competition was very intense. After his interactions with customers for about six to seven months, he prepared a report for his boss, General Manager, Consumer Banking (GMCB). In this report, he had summarized the challenges of marketing IB products in a market meant for conventional banking. When he presented the report to GMCB, he met with unfavorable reactions. GMCB was not convinced that IB products had any competition from conventional banking. He gave Azhar one additional month to either revise his thinking or quit the organization.

Expected learning outcomes

The expected learning outcomes are as follows: to enhance the awareness of IB products, principles and differences from the conventional banking products; to introduce the concept of business strategies for niche markets; to make students realize the importance of segmentation in view of niche market like IB.

Supplementary materials

Teaching notes are available for educators only. Please contact your library to gain login details or email support@emeraldinsight.com to request teaching notes.

Details

Emerald Emerging Markets Case Studies, vol. 5 no. 8
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2045-0621

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Article
Publication date: 26 June 2019

Muhammad Ahmed, Syed Ahmad Ali, Muhammad Tahir Jan and Arif Hassan

Organizations today strive to differentiate themselves from others with the help of various tools. Aaker’s brand personality model is one of them. It comprises five…

Abstract

Purpose

Organizations today strive to differentiate themselves from others with the help of various tools. Aaker’s brand personality model is one of them. It comprises five components namely, sincerity, excitement, sophistication, competence and ruggedness. This model has been tested and supported by various scholars in the past. Similarly, it also attracted a lot of criticism especially in terms of generalizability across countries and cultures. The purpose of this paper is twofold: first, to study Aaker’s model from an Islamic perspective; second, considering the dearth of brand personality knowledge in the services sector, to develop Islamic Banks’ Brand Personality (IBBP) model.

Design/methodology/approach

To propose IBBP model, traits in Aaker’s model have been investigated in the light of selected Quranic verses and sayings of Prophet Muhammad (ahadith). Later on, content validation was conducted as a pilot study with experts from the relevant fields.

Findings

Findings exhibit that Quran and hadith clearly elaborate and support majority dimensions of the existing model. Importantly, three new dimensions, namely, trustworthiness, justice and Shariah compliance, were added to develop a comprehensive IBBP model. Once the dimensions of IBBP model were finalized, the underlying items were content validated from 12 experts. Most of the items were approved; some were recommended for amendments and a few items were eliminated.

Practical implications

This research contributes to the branding as well as bank marketing literature as it is the first Islamic banks’ brand personality framework. With the help of IBBP model, Islamic banks can create a better brand image, use advertising strategies effectively and ultimately retain existing and attract more potential customers.

Social implications

This research elaborates the personality traits of Muslim consumer market. Following IBBP model, financial needs of Muslim consumer market can be catered effectively.

Originality/value

The IBBP model being first of its kind is significant for Islamic banking industry as it reflects dimensions that are supported by the Quran and hadith, and therefore suits Muslim customer market.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 2019

Muhammad Imran Malik, Hassan Mehmood and Waheed Ali Umrani

The purpose of this paper is to examine the factors affecting quality of work life (QWL) of teachers working in Higher Education Institutions.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the factors affecting quality of work life (QWL) of teachers working in Higher Education Institutions.

Design/methodology/approach

A cross-sectional study was conducted by sampling 347 teaching faculty members through questionnaires.

Findings

Fair communication plays the strongest role and social networks have the weakest role in shaping the QWL in higher educational institutions (HEIs) of Pakistan. The relationship of social networks and QWL negates the Hofstede’s view of Pakistan society to a great extent.

Research limitations/implications

A cross-sectional data set is used for tapping a small sample size. The direct effects of four factors were considered for examination. The examination of indirect effects for the factors having weak effects is recommended.

Practical implications

Decision makers having intentions to improve QWL in HEIs must adopt procedural justice and effective communication channels; they should have high respect for employees and should help them to develop networks within the HEIs.

Social implications

Inter-relationships at workplace are hampering due to weak social networks.

Originality/value

The study is an important landmark in highlighting the factors that must be available for higher QWL of faculty members of public sector HEIs.

Details

International Journal of Productivity and Performance Management, vol. 69 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0401

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2016

Mirza Muhammad Naseer and Khalid Mahmood

– The purpose of this paper is to explore the use of political party websites for e-electioneering and their impact on the outcome of the elections.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the use of political party websites for e-electioneering and their impact on the outcome of the elections.

Design/methodology/approach

Empirical data for the study were collected from the websites of 11 major political parties of Pakistan using modified version of the coding scheme used by Gibson, Rommele and Ward for the evaluation of functionality and delivery of websites. Data were analysed using web content analysis method to achieve the objectives of this study. The study also ranked the party websites based on points scored for functionalities and delivery.

Findings

The study found that although Pakistani political parties have started using their websites for communication with their voters during the general elections but they have not utilized the full potential of the website functionalities for e-electioneering.

Research limitations/implications

The study focused on content analysis of political party websites of Pakistan only. However, comparisons were made to other studies where possible to contextualize the results of this study in international perspective. It is suggested to replicate this study after ten years to study the changing behaviour of political parties.

Practical implications

Political parties might like to improve their websites in the light of findings of this study to spread their message more effectively to larger voter base.

Social implications

Findings of the study will help in improving the readiness of political parties for e-electioneering and improved websites will help voters in making an informed decision during election. It will overall improve the electoral process in the country where democratic system is not very strong.

Originality/value

With the advent of internet, political parties are using their websites during elections for various purposes. This study, first ever in Pakistan on the topic, provides empirical evidence on the use of political party websites during May 2013 general election in Pakistan and presents its impact on the outcome of the election. The study will be valuable for political science researchers especially those focusing on Asia and Pakistan.

Details

Internet Research, vol. 26 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1066-2243

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Article
Publication date: 28 August 2019

Ravindra Baliga, Rakesh Raut and Sachin Kamble

The purpose of this paper is to conceptualize a model for sustainable supply chain management (SSCM) that integrates the antecedents, practices and performance measures of…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to conceptualize a model for sustainable supply chain management (SSCM) that integrates the antecedents, practices and performance measures of sustainability. It also examines if lean management (LM) and supply management (SM) are antecedents of SSCM.

Design/methodology/approach

A systematic review of literature was undertaken across multiple streams, including operations management, SCM, sustainability, business ethics and performance management. Articles relevant to SSCM published over a span of 31 years (1988–2018) were searched using keywords and specific selection criteria.

Findings

From the literature, three dependent constructs – motivators of sustainability, LM and SM – and three independent constructs – environmental practices in SCM, social practices in SCM and SSCM performance – are identified and defined. Linkages between these constructs are hypothesized to develop a theoretical framework called the “integrated lean/supply management with sustainability motivators, practices and performance model.”

Research limitations/implications

Built on the principles-practices-outcomes framework proposed earlier, this model is comprehensive in its coverage of sustainability antecedents, practices and performance. Further, it covers the SCM triad – the supplier, the focal firm and the customers – as well as the roles they play in sustainability performance.

Originality/value

By identifying LM and SM as additional antecedents of SSCM, this study suggests that sustainability may be realized through LM and SM principles. Further, the proposed model presents a novel integration of literature from diverse domains.

Details

Benchmarking: An International Journal, vol. 27 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-5771

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Article
Publication date: 25 October 2019

Abhishek Behl and Pankaj Dutta

The purpose of this paper is to understand the interlinkages between corporate social responsibility (CSR) and crowdfunding in the context of disaster relief operations…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to understand the interlinkages between corporate social responsibility (CSR) and crowdfunding in the context of disaster relief operations (DRO). It intends to explore how information quality moderates the relationship of CSR and crowdfunding to achieve financial and social stability. The study also controls variables such as type of disaster, size of the firm and sector to which the firms belong while drawing implications.

Design/methodology/approach

The study collects empirical data in an Indian context through a structured questionnaire. The respondents belong to organizations which made a financial contribution toward DRO during the past decade (2008–2018). The sample size for data analysis is 232 responses belonging to different industries like plastic, chemical, textile and apparel, automotive parts and electronics, and construction. The study employs partial least squares structural equation modeling for testing the hypothesis.

Findings

Results indicate a positive effect of CSR activities on donation-based crowdfunding to achieve financial and social normalcy in a DRO. CSR can thus be used as an alternate way to support DRO. Results also reveal that quality of information positively impacts the relationship between crowdfunding and social aid as well as financial aid offered to the victims of the disasters. It is further observed that the type of disaster accounts for the inflow and frequency of funds made by companies as a part of their CSR activities.

Research limitations/implications

The study restricts its analysis to CSR contributions made by Indian firms for DRO in an Indian context. While the study is centered in an Indian context, it holds strong implications by offering guidelines and framework for integrating funds of the government, CSR contributions of companies and donations made by citizens. The outcome also provokes thoughts on testing the results with multiple disasters across the globe in order to validate the findings and possibly extend them.

Originality/value

The approach of the study holds a unique slot in understanding concepts relating to CSR, crowdfunding and information science literature in the context of DRO. The study offers unique contribution in making the readers aware how CSR funds, when guided through a donation-based crowdfunding platform can help achieve social and financial aid for the victims of natural disaster.

Details

Benchmarking: An International Journal, vol. 27 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-5771

Keywords

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