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Article
Publication date: 19 June 2017

Raquel Reis Soares, Ting Ting (Christina) Zhang, João F. Proença and Jay Kandampully

The purpose of this paper is twofold: to examine generational differences in complaint and post-recovery behaviors after service failures and recoveries, and to…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is twofold: to examine generational differences in complaint and post-recovery behaviors after service failures and recoveries, and to investigate the key factors that relate to Generation Y consumers’ responses.

Design/methodology/approach

In a two-stage approach, Study 1 investigates generational differences in the complaint and repurchase behaviors of a vast sample of more than 36,000 customers. Study 2 examines which factors influence Generation Y consumers’ decisions to complain and to repurchase.

Findings

Across four generational cohorts (the Silent Generation, Baby Boomers, Generation X, and Generation Y), consumers in Generation Y are the most likely to complain about service failures and repurchase after a satisfactory service recovery. The service recovery paradox thus is a generational feature. Generation Y’s unique characteristics – being tech savvy, heavily influenced by peers, and untrusting of brands – relate closely to their complaint and repurchase patterns. These prolific users of social media tend to stay with a service provider after experiencing satisfactory recovery but are more inclined to complain.

Originality/value

This study contributes to service management literature by revealing generational differences in customers’ complaint behavior and responses to recovery efforts, while also testing repurchase behavior rather than just behavioral intentions. This study provides valuable insights into the unique factors that influence Generation Y consumers’ complaint and post-recovery responses.

Details

Journal of Service Management, vol. 28 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-5818

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Article
Publication date: 21 August 2009

Raquel Reis, Caroline Oates, Martina McGuinness and Dominic Elliott

The purpose of this paper is to explore how business‐to‐business (BTB) relationships may be developed through direct marketing (DM) in the context of a Portuguese training…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore how business‐to‐business (BTB) relationships may be developed through direct marketing (DM) in the context of a Portuguese training organization.

Design/methodology/approach

Semi‐structured interviews (30) are undertaken, including 24 training directors and six participants from 30 different organizations. A grounded theory approach as used in data analysis is employed.

Findings

Two key roles of DM emerged from the paper: to establish a relationship between customers and training companies, this being dependent on the relevance of DM to the recipients' jobs/activities combined with the credibility of the DM source; and DM has a conditional role in the relationship development between customers and training companies. DM only has a role in developing relationships if the received DM is relevant to customers' training needs combined with positive perceptions of the past training performance in customers' minds. These perceptions are linked to quality and satisfaction, customers making an immediate association between the DM source and past training performance.

Practical implications

Customers want to receive DM from training companies which is relevant to their professional interests. These customers desire further follow‐up and diagnosis from training providers than is currently the case. Training providers are thus losing market opportunities. Further dialogue and interaction between companies and customers is necessary.

Originality/value

There has been limited empirical study of the processes and activities of DM in developing relationships in BTB contexts using a qualitative approach around customers' experiences.

Details

Direct Marketing: An International Journal, vol. 3 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-5933

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Article
Publication date: 31 August 2012

Rodolfo Bernabéu, Mónica Díaz, Raquel Olivas and Miguel Olmeda

This study aims to identify the most important attributes that the consumer uses in the process of choosing wine, which can then be used by wine‐producing companies in…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to identify the most important attributes that the consumer uses in the process of choosing wine, which can then be used by wine‐producing companies in marketing strategies.

Design/methodology/approach

The methodology consisted of a survey of 421 wine consumers using the best‐worst scaling methodology. Various consumer segmentations were made by gender, income and age groups.

Findings

The two main attributes that condition consumers in choosing wine are previous tasting and region of origin. The latter attribute is valued mainly by women and in general by consumers over 34 years old who have a net monthly family income above €1,500. The previously tasted attribute, which on many occasions is associated with the price attribute, is valued basically by men and particularly by younger consumers and those with lower incomes.

Practical implications

It must be pointed out that in the short term the basic strategy of wine‐producing enterprises from any given region of origin is to compete on price. However, in the long term increasing their prestige is all that remains to compete actively with the various regions of origin.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to a greater knowledge of Spanish consumer habits by analysing the most important wine attributes in the process of purchasing wine.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 114 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 21 August 2009

Adrian Palmer

Abstract

Details

Direct Marketing: An International Journal, vol. 3 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-5933

Content available
Article
Publication date: 25 February 2019

Raquel Ferreras-Garcia, Ana Beatriz Hernández-Lara and Enric Serradell-López

The purpose of this paper is twofold: first, to study which perceived and attained entrepreneurial competences acquired by students while developing a business plan are…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is twofold: first, to study which perceived and attained entrepreneurial competences acquired by students while developing a business plan are rated most highly; and second, to analyse the differences observed in entrepreneurial competences, depending on whether the business plan developed is real or fictitious.

Design/methodology/approach

To analyse the role played by business plans in perceptions and attainment of competence, data were collected from students enrolled on a final project course of a bachelor’s degree, specifically the Bachelor’s Degree in Business Administration and Management at the Universitat Oberta de Catalunya. The course in question focussed on entrepreneurship and business plans. The data on perceived and attained competences were obtained through questionnaires and assessment rubrics, respectively. Mean comparison analyses were conducted to investigate any differences in entrepreneurial competences existing between students developing real or fictitious business plans.

Findings

The paper finds evidence that the process of creating a business plan results in entrepreneurial competence being highly rated and that whether the business plan is real or fictitious does not affect the level of entrepreneurial competence.

Research limitations/implications

A longitudinal study will be required to analyse how entrepreneurial competences evolve during the business plan creation process.

Originality/value

This paper finds that few studies have been conducted to explore entrepreneurial competences in relation to business plan development and shows that more complete research is required. Moreover, both perceived and achieved competences are considered, an analysis not previously carried out.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 61 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 21 October 2020

Raquel Martinez-Buján, Elvira Santiago-Gómez, Carlos Diz, Jose A. Cortes-Vazquez and Montserrat Golías

This paper aims to show how the Green Campus Program has been implemented at the Faculty of Sociology of the University of A Coruña (Spain). It describes the criteria used…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to show how the Green Campus Program has been implemented at the Faculty of Sociology of the University of A Coruña (Spain). It describes the criteria used to create teaching sustainability actions related to community engagement to introduce education for sustainable development into college curricula.

Design/methodology/approach

Drawing on a human-centered design model approach, as well as on transformative teaching theories, this study explores the criteria used to build the Free Classroom based on a participatory model.

Findings

The authors argue that the success of this activity depends on how it relates to the theme-based specialization of the different academic degrees through which they are managed. Equally important is the creation of permanent spaces that enable the collaboration of other organizations, such as non-governmental associations and local public administrations.

Originality/value

The findings provide valuable insights into how the social dimension of sustainability in higher education institutions can be emphasized. A model of implementation of the activities is offered under which academic, political, student and community agents are coordinated to favor the change of attitudes and behaviors to strengthen SD.

Details

International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, vol. 21 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-6370

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 26 July 2021

Nicol R. Howard and Keith E. Howard

The purpose of this chapter is to critically analyze the historical relations between Black students and the American education system. In particular, this chapter is…

Abstract

The purpose of this chapter is to critically analyze the historical relations between Black students and the American education system. In particular, this chapter is designed to challenge the status quo and examine the ways in which the K-12 educators today can mind the margins and remedy oppressive approaches to academically preparing and supporting Black students. Persistent informal educational tracking practices, an influx of education programs designed to segregate students, and educator biases all raise critical questions that must be addressed concerning educational equity for Black students.

Details

Minding the Marginalized Students Through Inclusion, Justice, and Hope
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-795-2

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 4 December 2017

Anne Pässilä, Allan Owens, Paula Kuusipalo-Määttä, Tuija Oikarinen and Raquel Benmergui

In exploring the impact of reflective and work applied approaches, the authors are curious how vivid new insights and collective “Eureka” momentums occur. These momentums…

Abstract

Purpose

In exploring the impact of reflective and work applied approaches, the authors are curious how vivid new insights and collective “Eureka” momentums occur. These momentums can be forces for work communities to gain competitive advantages. However, the authors know little of how learning is actively involved in the processing of creating new insights and how such a turning to learning mode (Pässilä and Owens, 2016) can be facilitated. In the light of cultural studies and art education, the purpose of this paper is to explore how the method of dramatising characters (DC) in a specific innovation culture can be facilitated. In this viewpoint, the authors are suggesting one approach for this type of turning to learning which the authors call Beyond Text, outlining its theoretical underpinnings, its co-creative development and its application.

Design/methodology/approach

In this Beyond Text context, the authors are introducing the method of DC and the method of iStory both of which are the authors’ own design based on the theory of the four existing categories of a research-based theatre.

Findings

The findings of this viewpoint paper are that both iStory as well as DC methods are useful and practical learning facilitation processes and platforms that can be adopted for use in organisations for promoting reflexivity. Especially they can act as a bridge between various forms of knowing and consummate the other knowledge types (experiential, practical and propositional) in a way that advances practice-based innovation.

Originality/value

The originality and value of iStory and DC is that they can be utilised as dialogical evaluation methods when traditional evaluation strategies and pre-determined indicators are unusable.

Details

Journal of Work-Applied Management, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2205-2062

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2020

Julio Navío-Marco, Raquel Ibar-Alonso and Maria Bujidos-Casado

The purpose of this paper is to analyse the relationship between coopetition and organisational innovation in EU countries. As coopetition is usually studied from an…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyse the relationship between coopetition and organisational innovation in EU countries. As coopetition is usually studied from an inter-company perspective, this work looks in detail at the “ad intra” dynamics of the coopeting companies to understand how they adjust their organisation or implement organisational innovation to successfully adopt this original approach.

Design/methodology/approach

Using data from the Eurostat (CIS2014), this research offers a quantitative study into coopeting companies, relating coopetition to organisational innovation. The analysis technique used in this study is logistic regression with maximum likelihood estimation, where the dependent variable is the location of the coopeting companies.

Findings

The findings highlight specific characteristics and differences according to whether a company coopetes domestically or in other more complex geographic environments. It also incorporates variables into the analysis, such as the use of price marketing, employee training and company size.

Originality/value

This study provides insights into the relationship between coopetition and organisational innovation, in a research field that usually focusses on inter-company analysis. Several little-studied factors are included in the analysis, such as the role of employee qualifications and differences in coopetition in different geographic areas. The authors observe that, in certain locations, coopetition could be related to a “market entry” effect.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 4 February 2019

Raquel Pérez-delHoyo, María Dolores Andújar-Montoya, Higinio Mora and Virgilio Gilart-Iglesias

The purpose of this paper is to study the unexpected consequences in the operation of urban environments. Prediction within the urban planning process often presents…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to study the unexpected consequences in the operation of urban environments. Prediction within the urban planning process often presents difficulties and unintended consequences. It is not enough to develop a good project. Unexpected consequences are possible because of the environment. The authors argue that these problems of uncertainty can be minimized with citizen participation and the use of new technologies.

Design/methodology/approach

The problem of how urban planning initiatives result in unexpected consequences is described. These effects are determined by studying a series of cities and real urban environments. A case study on urban accessibility is developed for a better understanding of the problem.

Findings

Avoiding unexpected consequences in the operation of urban environments is strongly linked to the concept of Smart City 3.0. This concept is based on the co-creation. In this line to address the problem, a citizen-centric methodology using the latest information and communications technologies and internet of things technologies is presented. As a practical application, different categories of unexpected events related to the Faculty of Education building at the University of Alicante have been identified as a consequence of the impact of its environment. An uncomfortable or non-accessible environment causes unforeseen behaviour of individuals.

Originality/value

There are no analytical tools to investigate how aspects of the urban environment cause uncertainty about the acceptance of projects by future citizen users. This work takes a step forward in that direction.

Details

Kybernetes, vol. 48 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0368-492X

Keywords

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