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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2000

George K. Chako

Briefly reviews previous literature by the author before presenting an original 12 step system integration protocol designed to ensure the success of companies or…

Abstract

Briefly reviews previous literature by the author before presenting an original 12 step system integration protocol designed to ensure the success of companies or countries in their efforts to develop and market new products. Looks at the issues from different strategic levels such as corporate, international, military and economic. Presents 31 case studies, including the success of Japan in microchips to the failure of Xerox to sell its invention of the Alto personal computer 3 years before Apple: from the success in DNA and Superconductor research to the success of Sunbeam in inventing and marketing food processors: and from the daring invention and production of atomic energy for survival to the successes of sewing machine inventor Howe in co‐operating on patents to compete in markets. Includes 306 questions and answers in order to qualify concepts introduced.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 12 no. 2/3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

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Article
Publication date: 26 February 2021

Édney Santos and Daphne Halkias

The purpose of this qualitative multiple case study was to gain a deeper understanding of the views of stakeholders residing within impoverished communities in Angola on…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this qualitative multiple case study was to gain a deeper understanding of the views of stakeholders residing within impoverished communities in Angola on rapid technology diffusion and its implication on labor market challenges within their regions. To address this gap, and consistent with the qualitative paradigm, this paper conducted methodological triangulation of the study’s multiple data sources, including semistructured interviews and archival data in the form of government labor reports, reflective field notes and archival data to establish the trustworthiness of the study’s data analysis and findings.

Design/methodology/approach

A gap in the literature exists between the general diffusion of technological innovations and socioeconomic development that results in an ambiguous connection between theory, academia and professional practice among sub-Saharan African countries. To inform governments in developing countries on how to effectively achieve the diffusion of innovations (DoI), this integrative literature review supports a broader qualitative multiple case study that offers insights into the views of stakeholders residing within impoverished communities in Angola, on rapid technology diffusion and its implication for labor market challenges. This overview of existing research offers a targeted knowledge base that can support future research and help promote the potential for socioeconomic development in low-income countries. By addressing the patterns of the relationship between various economic imbalances and the adoption of technology that promote the social divide, along with highlighting the importance of understanding the overall technological dualism between various social groups, promises effective policies for successful DoI in impoverished sub-Saharan African regions by evaluating its impact on local labor market challenges.

Findings

The results of this multiple case study research oversee a thematic analysis of the data collected based on the study’s multiple sources, following a cross-case analysis in which this paper synthesizes the findings of the initial thematic analysis of data to answer the study’s central research question. The multiple case study approach in this research follows the concept of replication logic discussed by Yin (2017) in which the same findings are replicated across multiple cases as similarities and differences are traced across cases, and the study results obtained in this way are deemed robust and reliable.

Research limitations/implications

A potential key limitation in this study was associated to the participants’ limited experiences about the study’s central phenomenon, which if inadequate, could not have been reflective of the challenges faced and shared by the target population. This study mitigates the limitation with an observation in which a much sharper understanding of the participants’ knowledge about the topic of interest was developed. Another limitation was the sample size that could have been small and may not be representative of the entire population. This study mitigates the limitation through careful interpretation of the data and strong conclusion of results.

Practical implications

For practical implications, this study emphasized the importance of participative approaches to ICT implementation that if well adapted by policymakers could lead to a more contextually anchored ICT-supported poverty alleviation within different dimensions of poverty.

Social implications

This study addresses an under-researched area on why innovation policy initiatives calling for technology diffusion in Angola continue to stall rather than combating labor market challenges in impoverished communities. This study brings the voices of local populations on technology diffusion in impoverished regions of Angola to the extant literature, launching the development of a body of knowledge that may point the way to a promising avenue of social change through innovation and technology diffusion.

Originality/value

This research is original and significant in that it addresses an under-researched area on innovation policy initiatives calling for technology diffusion in Angola that continue to stall rather than combating labor market challenges in impoverished communities. This study also makes an original contribution to Rogers’s seminal theory and concept of diffusion of innovations. The study’s results guided further research in technology adoption and innovation diffusion within Angola, a nation faced with poor human capital development and an increasing proportion of the world’s poorest people and unemployment.

Details

Journal of Enterprising Communities: People and Places in the Global Economy, vol. 15 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6204

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Article
Publication date: 8 March 2011

Anssi Tuulenmäki and Liisa Välikangas

The purpose of this paper is to introduce a model of “rapid execution innovation” designed to increase the likelihood of achieving the kind of breakthroughs that develop

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to introduce a model of “rapid execution innovation” designed to increase the likelihood of achieving the kind of breakthroughs that develop into successful new business models developed by the authors.

Design/methodology/approach

Their recent field experience indicates that companies should scrap the comforting safety of new product planning and stage‐gate schedules. Instead, company leaders should learn to practice high‐speed innovation experimentation, from ideation to operational execution, in order to offer products and services with unique customer benefits.

Findings

In their model, companies start this process by conducting experiments that promote a radical rethinking of a business opportunity and then continue experimenting as the original idea evolves into a product.

Research limitations/implications

This paper draws on an ambitious research project in Finland called MIND (Managing Industry‐Changing Innovations, see www.mindspace.fi), which seeks to “make Finland the world leader in strategic business innovation.”

Practical implications

This is a sample how‐to; practical experiments show whether the fundamental assumptions about radical innovation are correct.

Originality/value

Although seemingly simple, such an experimental approach to business model innovation is rarely practiced even in businesses dedicated to innovation.

Details

Strategy & Leadership, vol. 39 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1087-8572

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2012

Jonathan P. Allen and Dave Geller

This paper aims to present a theory of the perceived outcomes of open source software adoption for an organizational IT department.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to present a theory of the perceived outcomes of open source software adoption for an organizational IT department.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is an interpretive case study of three open source pilot projects in local government, based on interviews with IT management, IT staff, and users. Data analysis based on constructivist grounded theory is used to generate theory about the perceived organizational outcomes of open source adoption.

Findings

Open source adoption is perceived as an occasion for rapidly developing effective new business applications, even in the context of shrinking IT resources and a poor relationship between IT and the rest of the organization. IT management and staff see the potential to improve their strained relationship with users, and improve their image of themselves as product developers and explorers. Disruptive project strategies, that keep open source adoptions outside of normal resource allocation processes, are consistently associated with open source success.

Research limitations/implications

While only exploratory, the case study shows that open source deployments can have a significant impact on the wider organization, up to and including the announcement of the first municipal government policy in the USA requiring that open source be considered for all future software acquisitions.

Practical implications

The case study offers a pathway for IT departments to achieve better perceived organizational outcomes, using fewer resources, under challenging circumstances.

Originality/value

The paper offers new conjectures on post‐adoption outcomes for open source researchers, and a new mechanism for IT department transformation in the information systems literature.

Details

Information Technology & People, vol. 25 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

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Article
Publication date: 13 April 2012

David H. Gilbert

The purpose of this paper is to examine the notion of designing and developing applied, industry‐engaged learning environments that embrace ambiguity and uncertainty in…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the notion of designing and developing applied, industry‐engaged learning environments that embrace ambiguity and uncertainty in overcoming pedagogical inertia in educating young entrepreneurs and innovators. The research reported on proposes a solution to the dual expectations of producing entrepreneurship graduates who can either hit the ground running in driving innovation for employers, or create, launch and sustain their own ventures.

Design/methodology/approach

The research is longitudinal in nature, employing a mixed methods approach using both quantitative and qualitative instruments in measuring outcomes, along with development and validation of the proposed Create‐Substantiate‐Activate (CSA) scale.

Findings

Significant triangulated evidence is provided that validates the proposed dynamic, industry‐engaged learning model. The skill and capability development of the entrepreneurship students, as well as the positive impacts upon self‐confidence and self‐efficacy, support the approach adopted in moving beyond the business planning paradigm into rapid innovation prototyping.

Research limitations/implications

The paper reports on one program within an undergraduate Entrepreneurship degree at one Australian university. Therefore, the suitability for adoption of the proposed model will be subject to factors germane to particular contexts.

Practical implications

The research provides direction for designing and managing collaborative industry‐engaged learning programs for students of Entrepreneurship and Innovation. Critical elements of the learning process are identified that foster contexts for producing Entrepreneurship graduates that are both highly valued by employers and capable of launching and sustaining innovative new businesses.

Originality/value

The Innovation Fastrack Program reported on in this paper is ground‐breaking in the way it engages industry, promotes rapid and deep learning contextualised by creativity, curiousity, uncertainty and volatility and in the way it fosters social interaction in dealing with real‐world problems and opportunities.

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Book part
Publication date: 8 December 2016

Chris Batt

To investigate how the United Kingdom’s public museums, libraries and archives (collecting institutions) might, in the future, take strategic advantage of the dramatic…

Abstract

Purpose

To investigate how the United Kingdom’s public museums, libraries and archives (collecting institutions) might, in the future, take strategic advantage of the dramatic changes in individual and social behaviours and expectations driven by the socio-technical determinism of the Internet since 2000.

Methodology/approach

The chapter summarises the evidence and outcomes of PhD research completed in 2015 that used the tools of hermeneutic phenomenology and systems theory to examine the current state of digital strategy within the United Kingdom’s collecting institutions and to compare this with the Internet’s fundamental drivers of change and innovation. The research sought not to predict the future, but to define the key opportunities and challenges facing collecting institutions in face of sustained socio-technical change to maintain strategic fit, delivering maximum value in the digital space.

Findings

The outcomes of the research demonstrated that libraries, like museums and archives, are ill-prepared to face continued socio-technical determinism. The key drivers of the Internet are single channel convergence, rapid innovation, instant two-way communication driving social interaction and dramatic change in the relationship between the supplier and the user. Collecting institutions, on the other hand, operate within vertically integrated silos restricting horizontal collaboration that has led to fragmentation of developments and constraints on strategy across and within the various institutional sectors. The major challenges that libraries must consider are summarised.

Originality/value

The research takes an approach that has never before been attempted, either in scope or depth of analysis. The conclusions may not make comfortable reading for practitioners, but they offer an agenda for new ways of thinking about how public institutions must change to sustain their strategic fit in a digital future.

Details

Innovation in Libraries and Information Services
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-730-1

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Article
Publication date: 30 September 2020

Divesh Ojha, Elisabeth Struckell, Chandan Acharya and Pankaj C. Patel

The research first and uniquely explores the antecedent relationship among three highly studied environmental forces – competitive intensity (CI), market turbulence (MT…

Abstract

Purpose

The research first and uniquely explores the antecedent relationship among three highly studied environmental forces – competitive intensity (CI), market turbulence (MT) and technological turbulence (TT) – in a service context. Next, given the importance of services to the USA and global gross domestic product (GDP) and the unique characteristics of services versus product firms, the research examines the impact of environmental forces on innovation speed capability, a less studied but critical enabler of service innovation. Finally, this study aims to suggest the importance of the sequential relationship between two dynamic capabilities – innovation speed and operational flexibility – to realize advantage.

Design/methodology/approach

This study surveyed 264 US service firms in a business to business context and tested this research model using structural equation modeling.

Findings

The results yielded three major conclusions: in a service context when examining the relationship among the three environmental forces, CI appears to have the driving influence on MT and TT, MT, however, was the only environmental force that this study found to bare positive and significant direct influence on innovation speed. Looking at the zero-order effect of MT and TT on innovation speed this study found each to be positive and significant suggesting a negative suppression effect and innovation speed’s influence on performance relative to competitors is fully mediated by operational flexibility.

Originality/value

The paper contributes to context, as service firms represent the majority of the USA and global GDP. This study extends the literature on the highly studied environmental forces (MT, TT and CI) by examining how they influence each other in an antecedent role and in service context. This study extends service literature by going beyond the influence of environmental forces on innovation to examine the dynamic capability of innovation speed, suggested as uniquely important to service context and distinct from the more highly studied innovation construct. The study also extends prior research in the manufacturing (product) context that suggests the importance of sequential congruence between two critical dynamic capabilities – innovation speed and operational flexibility – necessary to deliver competitive advantage.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

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Article
Publication date: 18 July 2008

Anand Nair and William R. Boulton

This paper aims to examine how firms, operating in mature and growing industries, can improve the alignment of their operations strategy to fit situations characterized by…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine how firms, operating in mature and growing industries, can improve the alignment of their operations strategy to fit situations characterized by varying rates of industry growth and technological changes.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors enhance the operations strategy typology presented by Lei and Slocum by incorporating an enhanced set of competitive priorities and supporting structure/infrastructure requirements into their four cell matrix. They then introduce a stage‐based model of environmental dynamism and complexity that can foster major transitions in operations strategy.

Findings

Industry growth and technological change interact to create alternative environments with varying levels of dynamism and complexity requiring realignment of operations strategy. With increasing rates of technological change, the authors emphasize an urgent need to include innovation as a competitive priority (along with cost, quality, delivery and flexibility) to proactively adapt operations strategy to fit changing environments. It is also necessary for managers to ensure a fit between their competitive priorities and the development of supporting structures/infrastructures to ensure effective implementation of competitive operations strategy.

Originality/value

Operations strategy literature has not focused attention on the basic goals and capabilities needed to implement or adapt to today's dynamic environments. This study adds innovation as a competitive priority and improves our understanding of adaptation of operations strategy to alternative environments created by the interaction of industry growth and technological change. Specifically, by focusing on competitive priorities and supporting capabilities in dynamic environments, the authors provide directions for implementing changes to operations strategy.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 28 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

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Book part
Publication date: 9 November 2004

Thomas P Murtha

The increasing pace of global competition has recast the balance between multinational corporations’ (MNCs’) needs to protect the knowledge that underlies their…

Abstract

The increasing pace of global competition has recast the balance between multinational corporations’ (MNCs’) needs to protect the knowledge that underlies their competitive advantages and their needs to continually create new knowledge. This essay will discuss MNCs’ knowledge-seeking strategies as industry-level phenomena. I will argue that knowledge-seeking strategies demand a concept of industries both as arenas for competition and as global knowledge networks within which firms collaborate to innovate. Contemporary MNCs face challenges to function not only as self-contained production systems that internationalize in the search for efficiency and markets, but also as open systems globally seeking knowledge and innovations. Metanational strategies and organizations represent a new response to these challenges. I present empirical evidence of distinctive metanational industry opportunities and organizational responses from the emergence of the global flat panel display industry. The essay concludes with a framework that outlines the characteristics of a global knowledge-driven generic strategy as an alternative and synthesis of generic product-driven strategies of cost-leadership and differentiation.

Details

"Theories of the Multinational Enterprise: Diversity, Complexity and Relevance"
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-285-6

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Article
Publication date: 12 June 2020

Haili Zhang, Xiaotang Zhang and Michael Song

The purpose of this study is to develop a theoretical model for examining how innovation speed mediates the relationship between knowledge management (KM) and performance…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to develop a theoretical model for examining how innovation speed mediates the relationship between knowledge management (KM) and performance and empirically tests the proposed model using data collected in the USA and China over three years.

Design/methodology/approach

To avoid common method bias and increase ability to draw causal effects of KM on performance, data were collected over three years. KM data were collected by survey; innovation speed data were collected in the following year; and sales growth and gross margin data were collected over the next three years. After merging the three data sets, the final empirical data used for this study contained data from 354 USA and 647 Chinese firms. Multiple regression analyses were used to test the research hypotheses. Sobel mediation tests were performed to test the mediating effects of innovation speed on the relationship between KM and performance.

Findings

Innovation speed has a U-shaped relationship with performance in both US and Chinese firms. Knowledge generation has an inverted U-shaped relationship with innovation speed in both US and Chinese firms. Knowledge dissemination increases innovation speed in US firms but not in Chinese firms. While knowledge application increases innovation speed in the US firms, it decreases innovation speed in Chinese firms.

Originality/value

This study is among the first to propose and empirically test the KM-innovation speed-performance relationship. This paper advances the KM literature by demonstrating that there is an inverted U-shaped relationship between knowledge generation and innovation speed and that there is a U-shaped relationship between innovation speed and performance. In addition, this study contributed to the cross-national study of KM.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 24 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

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