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Article
Publication date: 10 September 2018

Raphaela Stadler, Allan Stewart Jepson and Emma Harriet Wood

Reflecting, reliving and reforming experiences enhance longer-term effects of travel and tourism, and have been highlighted as an important aspect in determining loyalty…

Abstract

Purpose

Reflecting, reliving and reforming experiences enhance longer-term effects of travel and tourism, and have been highlighted as an important aspect in determining loyalty, re-visitation and post-consumption satisfaction. The purpose of this paper is to develop new methodological approaches to investigate emotion, memory creation and the resulting psychosocial effects.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper proposes a unique combination of physiological measures and photoelicitation-based discussions within a longitudinal design. A physiological measuring instrument (electrodermal activity [EDA] tracking technology through Empatica E4 wristbands) is utilised to capture the “unadulterated” emotional response both during the experience and in reliving or remembering it. This is combined with post-experience narrative discussion groups using photos and other artefacts to give further understanding of the process of collective memory creation.

Findings

EDA tracking can enhance qualitative research methodologies in three ways: through use as an “artefact” to prompt reflection on feelings, through identifying peaks of emotional response and through highlighting changes in emotional response over time. Empirical evidence from studies into participatory arts events and the potential well-being effects upon women over the age of 70 is presented to illustrate the method.

Originality/value

The artificial environment created using experimental approaches to measure emotions and memory (common in many fields of psychology) has serious limitations. This paper proposes new and more “natural” methods for use in tourism, hospitality and events research, which have the potential to better capture participants’ feelings, behaviours and the meanings they place upon them.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 30 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 6 May 2021

Trudie Walters, Raphaela Stadler and Allan Stewart Jepson

The importance of events for marginalised groups has largely been overlooked within tourism, hospitality and event studies. The purpose of this study is to address this…

Abstract

Purpose

The importance of events for marginalised groups has largely been overlooked within tourism, hospitality and event studies. The purpose of this study is to address this gap, emphasising the positive outcomes of power relationships rather than the negative, which have traditionally been the focus in event studies.

Design/methodology/approach

The study investigated eight events for indigenous and ethnic minority groups, rural women, disabled people and seniors in Australia and New Zealand. Qualitative data was collected via participant observation, reflexive ethnography, semi-structured interviews and in-the-moment conversations. An inductive thematic approach was taken to data analysis.

Findings

Eight themes around notions of power and empowerment were identified during the analysis: providing a platform, giving/taking ownership, gaining confidence, empowering with/through knowledge, respect, pride and affirmation, freedom to “be” and resistance. These were then viewed through the lenses of social-structural and psychological empowerment, enabling a deeper understanding of power at/through events.

Research limitations/implications

The paper presents a framework for empowerment that enables event organisers to both understand and deliberately plan for the productive use of power, which can reaffirm important event aims, objectives and values. It can also be used by researchers as a framework through which to identify and assess the contributing elements of empowerment at events and by local government to guide policymaking around events.

Originality/value

This study is the first to highlight best practices for the positive use of power at events that “empowers” marginalised groups. Grounded in empowerment theory, the study offers a new lens to reframe notions of power and provides a theoretical framework that will be of value for both critical event studies researchers, event organisers and policymakers alike.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 33 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 8 February 2016

Raphaela Stadler and Simone Fullagar

Problem-solving approaches to research have dominated the not-for-profit festival management field. Little attention has been paid to how festival organizations…

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1835

Abstract

Purpose

Problem-solving approaches to research have dominated the not-for-profit festival management field. Little attention has been paid to how festival organizations successfully create cultures where knowledge transfer is practised within the high intensity of a festival life cycle. Drawing upon insights from social practice theory and appreciative inquiry (AI), the purpose of this paper is to offer a different conceptual approach to understanding how knowledge transfer “works” as an organizational practice to produce a collaborative festival culture.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper draws upon an ethnographic case study with the highly acclaimed Queensland Music Festival organization in Australia. The research questions and methods were framed around an appreciative approach that identified formal and informal practices that " worked " rather than a conventional problem-focused analysis.

Findings

This research focused on appreciating the cultural context that shaped the interrelationships between formal and informal knowledge transfer practices that enabled trust and collaboration. A range of knowledge transfer practices was identified that contributed to the creation of a shared festival ethos and the on-going sustainability of the festival vision.

Practical implications

The not-for-profit sector brings numerous challenges for festival organizations, and there is a need to appreciate how collaborative and creative knowledge transfer can occur formally and informally. Festival organizers can benefit from understanding the relational and practice dimensions of knowledge management as they are performed within specific organizational contexts.

Originality/value

An appreciative understanding of knowledge transfer practices has not yet been applied to not-for-profit festival organizations, where problem-solving approaches dominate the field.

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Article
Publication date: 31 May 2013

Raphaela Stadler, Sacha Reid and Simone Fullagar

The purpose of this paper is to examine the utilisation and application of reflexive ethnography as an interpretative methodology for researching knowledge practices…

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1397

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the utilisation and application of reflexive ethnography as an interpretative methodology for researching knowledge practices within festival organisations.

Design/methodology/approach

The ethnographic approach incorporates two methods of data collection in the research design; participant observation and in‐depth interviews.

Findings

The research identified that knowledge management practices and processes are often invisible to festival staff when they are embedded within a cohesive organisational culture. Ethnography enables the researcher to make explicit the tacit and normalised ways of working that contribute to the success (and failure) of festival organisations to manage knowledge. The immersion of the researcher in the ethnographic process provided a rich understanding of the relational dimension of knowledge management that would be difficult to elicit from in‐depth interviews alone.

Research limitations/implications

New fields of study require a range of research methodologies to inform theoretical and practice‐based knowledge related to event participation and management. This article contributes to the growing event management literature through a unique focus on ethnography as a research method that offers a deeper understanding of knowledge practices within festival organisations.

Originality/value

Limited research has applied an ethnographic approach to festival and event management. This article builds upon early adopters and provides critical insight into the benefits and constraints of ethnographic research.

Details

International Journal of Event and Festival Management, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1758-2954

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 24 April 2020

Alison Stevens Booth and Fiona Mary Cameron

Family participation in community events and festivals is framed by certain conditions related to their ability to enhance their quality of life (QOL) and family…

Abstract

Purpose

Family participation in community events and festivals is framed by certain conditions related to their ability to enhance their quality of life (QOL) and family flourishing. For communities to flourish, families must feel safe, secure, accepted and included. The research has the following aims: (1) to consider whether location is a determinant in family QOL and event participation, and (2) to identify how cultural identity and family issues may affect families' QOL and the role events play in their ability to flourish as a family.

Design/methodology/approach

An integrated mixed-methods design was used derived from quantitative and qualitative traditions, including surveys, interviews and secondary data. The survey component combined Jepson and Stadler's St Albans 2015 QOL study survey with research instruments used by the Rotorua Lakes Council (RLC). The Rotorua sample included 521 valid anonymous online surveys and 11 semi-structured interviews. The RLC's Arts and Culture team provided expert advice, strategic plans and reports; secondary data were gathered from media reports.

Findings

When comparing key Rotorua and St Albans data, the participants' responses were very similar. What appear significant are socio-economic and cultural differences and family-flourishing factors specific to Rotorua's location and population. The findings show that the biggest obstacles for families attending events are money, work commitments and family obligations. The events reflect the region's unique cultural profile and provide a distinctive identifier of place and people that create a unique small-city event portfolio.

Research limitations/implications

This study's findings have reinforced that for small-city events to succeed and attract high levels of patronage, council and community must work cooperatively towards common goals. Our findings indicate the importance, to our participants, of emotional attachment to Rotorua's natural landscape, built environment and unique cultural heritage. Additionally, arts and culture research focusing on new-migrant and multi-generational event participation is worth further consideration for preserving Rotorua's cultural history. Perceptions within the Rotorua community of their family experience at local events are central to our ongoing research and the further successful delivery of the RLC's event portfolio.

Originality/value

This research offers a case study that serves to build further areas of inquiry into the role events play in QOL, family flourishing and maintaining indigenous cultures. Study findings have reinforced that organisations, practitioners, festivals and events succeed in attracting high levels of patronage for a small city. This study provides insights for designing culturally inclusive event portfolios that include events and festivals that target family audiences.

Details

International Journal of Event and Festival Management, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1758-2954

Keywords

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