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Article
Publication date: 11 October 2019

Sunil Babbar, Xenophon Koufteros, Ravi S. Behara and Christina W.Y. Wong

This study aims to examine publications of supply chain management (SCM) researchers from across the world and maps the leadership role of authors and institutions based…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine publications of supply chain management (SCM) researchers from across the world and maps the leadership role of authors and institutions based on how prolific they are in publishing and on network measures of centrality while accounting for the quality of the outlets that they publish in. It aims to inform stakeholders on who the leading SCM scholars are, their primary areas of SCM research, their publication profiles and the nature of their networks. It also identifies and informs on the leading SCM research institutions of the world and where leadership in specific areas of SCM research is emerging from.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on SCM papers appearing in a set of seven leading journals over the 15-year period of 2001-2015, publication scores and social network analysis measures of total degree centrality and Bonacich power centrality are used to identify the highest ranked agents in SCM research overall, as well as in some specific areas of SCM research. Social network analysis is also used to examine the nature and scope of the networks of the ranked agents and where leadership in SCM research is emerging from.

Findings

Authors and institutions from the USA and UK are found to dominate much of the rankings in SCM research both by publication score and social network analysis measures of centrality. In examining the networks of the very top authors and institutions of the world, their networks are found to be more inward-looking (country-centric) than outward-looking (globally dispersed). Further, researchers in Europe and Asia alike are found to exhibit significant continental inclinations in their network formations with researchers in Europe displaying greater propensity to collaborate with their European-based counterparts and researchers in Asia with their Asian-based counterparts. Also, from among the journals, Supply Chain Management: An International Journal is found to exhibit a far more expansive global reach than any of the other journals.

Research limitations/implications

The journal set used in this study, though representative of high-quality SCM research outlets, is not exhaustive of all potential outlets that publish SCM research. Further, the measure of quality that this study assigns to the various publications is based solely on a publication score that accounts for the quality of the journals, as rated by Association of Business Schools that the papers appear in and nothing else.

Practical implications

By informing the community of stakeholders of SCM research about the top-ranked SCM authors, institutions and countries of the world, the nature of their networks, as well as what the primary areas of SCM research of the leading authors in the world are, this research provides stakeholders, including managers, researchers and students, information that is helpful to them not only because of the insights it provides but also for the gauging of potential for embedding themselves in specific networks, engaging in collaborative research with the leading agents or pursuing educational opportunities with them.

Originality/value

This research is the first of its kind to identify and rank the top SCM authors and institutions from across the world using a representative set of seven leading SCM and primary OM journals based on publication scores and social network measures of centrality. The research is also the first of its kind to identify and rank the top authors and institutions within specific areas of SCM research and to identify future research opportunities relating to aspects of collaboration and networking in research endeavors.

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Article
Publication date: 3 August 2012

Alison Ashby, Mike Leat and Melanie Hudson‐Smith

The objective of this paper is to investigate systematically the discipline of supply chain management (SCM) within the context of sustainability. The two concepts are…

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16114

Abstract

Purpose

The objective of this paper is to investigate systematically the discipline of supply chain management (SCM) within the context of sustainability. The two concepts are increasingly aligned, and sustainable supply chain management (SSCM) represents an evolving field where they explicitly interact. Given their complex and holistic nature, breaking down the literature to understand its structures, processes, connections and limitations can provide an objective view of the status of research in these highly important fields, identifying key areas for future research/theory development.

Design/methodology/approach

A systematic review of current SCM literature is carried out, specifically in relation to the social and environmental dimensions of sustainability.

Findings

SSCM and the integration of sustainability into supply chains is a significant but evolving field evidenced by a current bias in the literature towards theory development and highly qualitative research methods. The environmental dimension is significantly better represented in the literature through specific processes at all stages of the supply chain. The social dimension is recognised, but receives less emphasis than expected given SCM's focus on interaction, relationships and communication. These two dimensions are treated separately in the literature with limited insight on how to integrate them and current SCM and sustainability research provides limited practical outputs.

Research limitations/implications

The review focuses on environmental and social sustainability within supply chains without explicit consideration of the economic dimension.

Practical implications

The review highlights the key themes and issues for supply chain managers faced with implementing sustainability. It also illustrates a number of areas for future research, along with the need for researchers to develop more practical tools for implementing SSCM.

Originality/value

Indicates the extent to which sustainability is integrated within SCM and where the research emphasis currently lies. The environmental dimension is significantly more defined and developed in the literature. SCM literature emphasises the importance of long‐term supplier relationships, but this “people‐focused” approach does not appear to translate into socially responsible supply chains. It suggests that the more process‐driven nature of environmental sustainability makes it easier to put into supply chain practice. There is also limited research or evidence on how the two dimensions can be integrated despite recognition of their inter‐relationship.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 17 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

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Article
Publication date: 2 September 2014

Muhammad Mustafa Kamal and Zahir Irani

This paper aims to focus on systematically analysing and synthesising the extant research published on supply chain integration (SCI) area, given the significance of SCI…

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4528

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to focus on systematically analysing and synthesising the extant research published on supply chain integration (SCI) area, given the significance of SCI research area. More specifically, the authors aim to answer three questions: “Q1 – What are the factors (e.g. both driving and inhibiting) that influence SCI?”, “Q2 – What are the key developments (e.g. both in research and industry) in SCI area?” and “Q3 – What are the approaches employed/discussed to integrate supply chains?”. Over the past decade, SCI has gained increasing attention in the supply chain management (SCM) context, both from the practitioners’ perspective and as a research area. In realising the global transformations and competitive business environment, a number of organisations are collaborating with their supply chain (SC) partners, to conduct seamless SC operations.

Design/methodology/approach

A systematic and structured literature review is carried out to observe and understand the past trends and extant patterns/themes in the SCI research area, evaluate contributions and summarise knowledge, thereby identifying limitations, implications and potential directions of further research. Thus, to trace the implementation of SCI practices, a profiling approach is used to analyse 293 articles (published in English-speaking peer-reviewed journals between 2000 and 2013) extracted from the Scopus database. The Systematic Review Approach proposed by Tranfield et al. (2003) was followed to analyse and synthesise the extant literature on SCI area.

Findings

The analysis presented in this paper has identified relevant SCI research studies that have contributed to the development and accumulation of intellectual wealth to the SCI and SCM area. Each of the 293 papers was examined for achieving the aim and objectives of the research, the method of data collection, the data analysis method and quality measures. While some of the papers provided information on all of these categories, most of them failed to provide all the information, especially for Q2 and Q3 that resulted in 23 and 21 papers, respectively.

Research limitations/implications

This study would have benefited from the analysis of further journals; however, the analysis of 293 articles from leading journals in the field of operations and SCM was deemed sufficient in scope. Moreover, this research has implications for researchers, journal editors, practitioners, universities and research institutions. It is likely to form the basis and motivation for profiling other database resources and specific operations and SCM-type journals in this area.

Practical implications

This systematic literature review highlights a taxonomy of contextual factors driving and inhibiting SCI for researchers and SC practitioners to refer to while researching or implementing SCI. It also exemplifies some areas for future research, along with the need for researchers to focus on developing more practical techniques for implementing SCI and improving organisational performance.

Originality/value

The prime value and uniqueness of this paper lies in analysing and compiling the existing published material in relation to Q1, Q2 and Q3, including examining other variables (such as yearly publications, geographic location of each publication, type of publication, type of research methods used), which lacks in the recent published five SCI literature review-based articles (by Kim, 2013; Leuschner et al., 2013; Alfalla-Luque et al., 2013; Parente et al., 2008; Fabbe-Costes and Jahre, 2007). This has been achieved by extracting and synthesising existing publications using “Supply Chain Integration” keyword. This paper provides a critique of the conceptual and empirical works in SCI discipline and offers research agendas that can stimulate future researchers to carefully explore the topic.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 19 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 3 July 2017

Alan C. McKinnon

In a previous paper (McKinnon, 2013), the author questioned the principle and practice of journal ranking and discussed its effects on logistics research. Since then…

Abstract

Purpose

In a previous paper (McKinnon, 2013), the author questioned the principle and practice of journal ranking and discussed its effects on logistics research. Since then several important developments have occurred prompting a fresh review of the issues. The paper summarises the results of this review with the aim of stimulating further discussion on the subject.

Design/methodology/approach

New literature on the journal ranking debate has been reviewed. The validity of the journal ranking as a proxy measure of paper quality is explored using data from the UK Research Excellence Framework (REF) assessment. Changes to the ranking of ten logistics/supply chain management (SCM) journals in four listings are analysed, and possible reasons for the relatively low status of the journals are examined.

Findings

The influence of journal rankings on the academic research process is strengthening while the debate about their legitimacy has intensified. UK REF data cast doubt on the reliability of the journal ranking as an indicator of a paper’s merit. Logistics/SCM journals continue to occupy mid-to-lower tier positions in most listings, though there has been some improvement in their standing.

Research limitations/implications

The paper aims to alert those managing and undertaking logistics research to the dangers of overreliance on journal rankings in the measurement of research quality and productivity.

Practical implications

The paper may help logistics/SCM scholars to defend the position of their discipline and resist journal-ranking-induced pressures to marginalise it and devalue its outputs.

Social implications

In this paper, academic recruitment, promotion and motivation are considered.

Originality/value

The paper sheds new light on the relationship between journal ranking and individual paper quality, on recent changes in the rating of logistics/SCM journals and on the wider debate about the use of bibliometrics in assessing research quality.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 47 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 10 October 2008

Diane H. Parente, Peggy D. Lee, Michael D. Ishman and Aleda V. Roth

This paper aims to establish a two‐part research agenda for marketing in supply chain management (SCM) through the application of an interdisciplinary model, using…

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3442

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to establish a two‐part research agenda for marketing in supply chain management (SCM) through the application of an interdisciplinary model, using marketing, operations, logistics/purchasing, and information technology as the nodes for a model.

Design/methodology/approach

After generating a list of the highly ranked and relevant journals in each of the four disciplines, an exhaustive search was conducted of the literature published from January 1999 through December 2002, using the keywords supply chain and supply chain management. The keywords were searched for in any field (i.e. title or abstract). The authors also conducted a Delphi study of experts to identify relevant journals in each field. The resulting articles were sorted by topic and mapped to one of the other remaining three functional disciplines. This yielded six intersections between functions, three of which are examined in this manuscript as dyads with marketing. Thus, it was possible to identify current overlap in topics researched and potential areas of overlap, representing opportunities for collaboration between the disciplines.

Findings

For simplicity and focus, this paper presents only marketing SCM research. The mapping process yielded: topics that are being researched from the marketing perspective but not in the IT, logistics, or operations perspectives; topics that are being researched from the IT, logistics, or operations perspectives but not from the marketing perspective; and similar (or identical) topics that are being researched from both the marketing and the IT perspective, the marketing and logistics perspective, and the marketing and operations perspective. Based on these mappings, an interdisciplinary research agenda for marketing SCM researchers was derived.

Research limitations/implications

Using an automated extraction of articles from published databases by using keywords may present inconsistencies. The authors have attempted to minimize the inconsistencies by documenting the process and cross‐validating the work in each function with at least two of the research team independently extracting, categorizing, and mapping the articles. Another limitation that arose was in terms of language. Since the research team consisted of researchers from different functional areas, it had to address semantics issues as the study was conducted. The authors also limited the initial endeavor to mapping only as a dyad and only using dichotomous variables. Future work on this model may include an ordinal ranking system or multi‐function mapping.

Practical implications

This work presents a useful model for determining an interdisciplinary research agenda in marketing. Since business and supply chain integration are increasingly important, concepts in business, academic research should take an interdisciplinary approach, providing the prospects for richer and more applicable results. Interdisciplinary research can also help to combat the silos that people tend to work in, creating new knowledge.

Originality/value

This paper provides the example of a model for determining an interdisciplinary research agenda. Supply chain management has been co‐opted by almost every business discipline. There is much to be learned by working together to bring new ideas and knowledge to bear on the issues related to managing the supply chain.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 23 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 27 April 2012

Alexander Ellinger, Hyunju Shin, William Magnus Northington, Frank G. Adams, Debra Hofman and Kevin O'Marah

The relationship between supply chain management (SCM) competency and firm performance is not well established empirically. This is largely because proven metrics for…

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7204

Abstract

Purpose

The relationship between supply chain management (SCM) competency and firm performance is not well established empirically. This is largely because proven metrics for quantifying the effects of SCM are scarce. Drawing on the strategic managerial concept of supply chain orientation as a source of competitive advantage, this paper aims to apply three independent sources of secondary data to examine the influence of SCM competency on two important firm performance metrics: customer satisfaction and shareholder value.

Design/methodology/approach

SCM competency is assessed with data from the expert opinion element of Gartner Supply Chain Group's (formerly AMR Research) supply chain top 25 rankings; the American Customer Satisfaction Index (ACSI) database and the recently developed Economic Value Added (EVA) Momentum financial metric are utilized as outcome measures.

Findings

Firms recognized by peers and experts for superior SCM competency exhibit higher levels of customer satisfaction and shareholder value than their respective industry averages.

Research limitations/implications

Further evidence is required to prove causality does exist between these variables. Limitations associated with the use of secondary data restricted the number of top performer firms available for this analysis. Nevertheless, the strong correlations found between SCM competency and two critical firm performance metrics may help senior managers and managers from other functional areas to better understand potential advantages associated with developing greater SCM competency.

Practical implications

The assessment of two metrics that differentiate top SCM performers from their industry competitors may also help SCM professionals to better convey the impact of SCM competency to non‐supply chain managers and external participants in the supply chain whose support and cooperation are critical to the success of process improvement initiatives.

Originality/value

In addition to the study findings, blending qualitative expert opinion, formal customer satisfaction and quantitative financial performance secondary data represents a relatively novel and informative method that responds to contentions that different approaches should be employed to develop a more holistic understanding of SCM.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 17 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 12 October 2015

Andreas Jede and Frank Teuteberg

There are cloud computing (CC) services available for various applications within supply chain management (SCM) processes and related enterprise information systems (ISs)…

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3085

Abstract

Purpose

There are cloud computing (CC) services available for various applications within supply chain management (SCM) processes and related enterprise information systems (ISs). These services offer, for example, consistent global networking platforms and shared real-time information. Furthermore, they enable quick decision making and ensure efficiency, which may strengthen competitive advantages as to digital processes within the supply chain (SC). However, research lacks a paper that systematically analyzes the interrelation between CC and SCM in detail and aims to become a reference point in the intersection of both research fields. Moreover, the purpose of this paper is to gain a deep understanding of the current state of research and to identify future research challenges.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper provides a cross-discipline systematic literature review from the research perspectives of ISs and SCM. In total, 99 papers have been investigated by combining qualitative and quantitative content analysis. As a side effect the authors developed a new methodological framework for conducting comprehensive literature reviews that could be applied by future research.

Finding

The authors discover the most important influence factors for CC implementations in SC processes and pay special attention to major issues, research methods, applied theoretical concepts, and geographical differences. Until now, SCM research in the realm of CC usage is still in its infancy both in theory and practice.

Research limitations/implications

Possibly not all of the relevant papers have been filtered during the paper selection phase. The findings of the literature review and the conceptual framework identifying different areas of concern are believed to be useful for future research to obtain an overview of the evolution of CC in SC processes.

Originality/value

To the best of the knowledge, there is no systematic literature review that consistently focusses CC usage within SC processes while integrating strategic aspects. Additionally, the authors constructed and applied a unique keyword analysis.

Details

Journal of Enterprise Information Management, vol. 28 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0398

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 2 April 2015

K.A. Chatha and I. Butt

A literature review within the manufacturing strategy (MS) discipline with a focus on thematic developments is provided. Based on recent studies, a set of challenges posed…

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2762

Abstract

Purpose

A literature review within the manufacturing strategy (MS) discipline with a focus on thematic developments is provided. Based on recent studies, a set of challenges posed to manufacturing enterprise of the future are summarized, and thematic areas are analyzed in relation to meeting those challenges. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on a select set of 506 articles published in top-ranked refereed international journals in the discipline of operations management, major and subthemes are identified and the publication trends in these themes are provided with time and across geographical regions, namely: North America, Europe, and other parts of the world.

Findings

MS literature is predominantly focussed on the economic objectives of firms without a due focus on the social and environmental perspectives. MS literature covers 11 major thematic areas, namely: MS components and paradigms, manufacturing capabilities (MCs), strategic choices (SCs), best practices (BPs), the strategy process (SP), supply-chain management (SCM), performance measurement, transnational comparisons, global manufacturing, environmental/green manufacturing, and literature reviews. The research in two areas – SCs, and MCs – has been in decline, while the research in BPs, the SP, and transnational comparisons is growing (in absolute figures). Various research opportunities for future studies are identified.

Research limitations/implications

The literature review is limited in its selection of articles and journals, however, the identified trends clarify the state of research by the MS research community at large.

Practical implications

For researchers, multiple new research directions are identified in order to advance knowledge in the field of MS. The publication trends also highlight thematic areas where most of the MS body of knowledge is currently available and can be utilized by practitioners.

Originality/value

The paper’s novelty comes from: first, a broader and deeper review of thematic areas that has not been researched before, second, trends in thematic areas by time, across geographical regions, and including time-region dyads, and third, coverage provided by MS literature in meeting challenges posed to manufacturing enterprise of the future.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 35 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 12 February 2019

Domingos Fernandes Campos, José Tarcísio de Andrade Lima Jr, Anielson Barbosa da Silva and António Jorge Fernandes

The purpose of this paper is to analyse professionals’ competencies in supply chain management (SCM) in the mid-sized supermarket sector in Brazil as a way of broadening…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyse professionals’ competencies in supply chain management (SCM) in the mid-sized supermarket sector in Brazil as a way of broadening the understanding of the importance and the use of competencies in business development.

Design/methodology/approach

The survey was conducted with 60 managers from 34 companies in the mid-sized supermarket sector in the metropolitan region of Natal, Brazil. The managers evaluated the importance and use of a set of 24 general and specific competencies related to SCM. The gaps between importance and use were identified and analysed.

Findings

The results showed that the level of use was below the level of importance for all competencies, and the general competencies somehow received more attention than specific competencies in the development and execution of SCM activities. Moreover, the overall average of the gaps between levels of use and importance calculated for the general competencies was less than the general average of the gaps calculated for the specific skills.

Research limitations/implications

The research was carried out with a sample of mid-sized supermarkets in a particular region. Therefore, it is recommended that the research be extended to other contexts and supermarket companies of other sizes.

Practical implications

The calculated gaps between managers’ expectations or attributed importance and the perceived levels of competence use in supermarket organisations revealed important lines of action for correcting the course in human resources policy.

Originality/value

The present paper elaborated on an opportunities matrix, gaps × importance, showing how managers can set priorities to fill competence gaps and improve the companies’ human resources. Besides, it compares levels of importance and uses for two groups of competencies, general and specific related to SCM.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 24 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2018

Martin Tanco, Matias Escuder, Gerardo Heckmann, Daniel Jurburg and Josue Velazquez

For the past 20 years, Latin American countries have gone from being a low-cost region to significant players in the world economy, with five of its countries ranked among…

Abstract

Purpose

For the past 20 years, Latin American countries have gone from being a low-cost region to significant players in the world economy, with five of its countries ranked among the world’s 50th largest by gross domestic product. This paper aims to study the contribution of Latin American researchers in the field of supply chain management (SCM) to aid an understanding of the Latin American impact within global supply chains (SCs).

Design/methodology/approach

The authors present a study which includes a bibliometric analysis of the papers authored by Latin American researchers in the SCM field and which were exclusively published in journals included in the Journal Citation Reports. In addition, the authors conducted a survey to Latin American researchers and consultants to gain greater understanding of the main difficulties, which in their opinion, have negatively affected the SCM area in Latin America within the past five years, and identify possible misalignment between Latin American research and the challenges for SC in the region.

Findings

The results show that Latin American research on SCM in the past nine years is not significant for the field considering the number of papers, citations and the papers published in top journals. Another interesting finding is the lack of collaboration among researchers from different Latin American countries, as well as with corporate. Finally, survey results reveal significant differences regarding the main difficulties each country perceived as relevant.

Practical implications

Comparing results from both analyses, relevant misalignments stand out between published research and the main difficulties detected. These suggest a challenging opportunity for Latin America, emphasizing the need to increase research contribution of the scientific community, through collaboration and alignment toward overcoming the most troublesome difficulties for Latin America. Therefore, the authors suggest future regional research directions which could also help global companies to tackle the challenges faced and optimize performance of their Latin American SCs.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, no previous research on the quality and impact of Latin American research in SCM has been conducted. Also, misalignments between researchers and practitioners in the region, which allow identifying weaknesses of Latin American SCs, have not been studied before.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 23 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

Keywords

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