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Article
Publication date: 21 September 2010

Carley Foster, Khanyapuss Punjaisri and Ranis Cheng

The corporate branding concept places an emphasis on employees' attitudes and behaviours. This has given rise to internal branding and employer branding, which argue for a closer…

30774

Abstract

Purpose

The corporate branding concept places an emphasis on employees' attitudes and behaviours. This has given rise to internal branding and employer branding, which argue for a closer alignment between the employees' values and those of the corporate brand. However, few studies have attempted to provide a platform by which the two concepts could be synergised to achieve a strong, consistent corporate brand. This paper therefore seeks to explore and demonstrate how the three concepts of branding are interrelated through a new framework.

Design/methodology/approach

Three bodies of literature (corporate branding, internal branding, and employer branding) were selected for review and examination in terms of their implications for the proposed framework that conceptualises the relationships between the three areas.

Findings

The review of the literature highlights the importance of employer branding and internal branding, and its potential to support the corporate brand‐building initiatives, whilst maintaining their distinctiveness in the literature. It also sheds light in terms of the inter‐relationships among the three concepts of branding.

Originality/value

The analysis of the literature reveals a degree of synergy and integration between employer branding and internal branding. It also facilitates a comprehensive understanding of the implications of the two concepts for branding and integrated corporate brand management.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 19 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 12 July 2011

Sheilagh Resnick, Ranis Cheng, Clare Brindley and Carley Foster

This study aims to explore the role of marketing in small and medium‐sized enterprises (SMEs) and to consider how amendments can be made to the UK higher education (HE) teaching…

2087

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to explore the role of marketing in small and medium‐sized enterprises (SMEs) and to consider how amendments can be made to the UK higher education (HE) teaching curriculum to inform marketing teaching and learning around a small business context.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative, exploratory approach using semi‐structured in‐depth interviews amongst ten owners of SMEs in the East Midlands region of the UK was used.

Findings

Marketing in SMEs is centred on customer engagement, networking and word of mouth communication. HE academic institutions should take account of these findings and work towards introducing SME‐specific marketing material in its teaching and learning curricula.

Research limitations/implications

This study uses a small number of SME companies in one region and therefore the generalisability of the findings may be limited. Further research could extend the number of SME companies and to other regions of the UK.

Practical implications

The findings have a bearing on the UK HE marketing curriculum. This study offers insights into how the marketing curriculum in HE needs to be adapted in light of the findings to ensure marketing graduates are equipped to enter SME employment.

Originality/value

Studies aligning how marketing in SMEs is practiced compared to HE teaching curriculum are limited. This research contributes to the body of literature by further exploring the characteristics and marketing activities of SMEs and highlighting the need to align teaching and practice of marketing in UK HE institutions.

Details

Journal of Research in Marketing and Entrepreneurship, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-5201

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 30 May 2008

Ranis Cheng, Tony Hines and Ian Grime

The paper seeks to examine the role of corporate identity in UK clothing retail organisations, focusing on the “fast fashion” sector. The aim is to analyse the “gap” between…

10495

Abstract

Purpose

The paper seeks to examine the role of corporate identity in UK clothing retail organisations, focusing on the “fast fashion” sector. The aim is to analyse the “gap” between desired identity and perceived identity within the sector.

Design/methodology/approach

An instrumental case study approach was adopted for this research. Companies' web sites and press releases were reviewed to find out the desired identity of organisations, while semi‐structured interviews were carried out with customers to elicit the perceived corporate identity. Themes developed from the cases will form the basis of further research.

Findings

This study has shown that although there are similarities, considerable “gaps” are present between the desired and perceived corporate identity of organisations, the latter being more important in understanding the research questions addressed which relate to corporate identity and the gap between desired and perceived identities. A number of propositions have emerged from the findings, which when investigated empirically will be useful for forming corporate identity constructs in the fashion retail sector.

Research limitations/implications

This research provides some useful insights into the role of corporate identity within the fast fashion retail sector; however, it is not sufficient to make generalisable claims outside the cases examined. Further research is required to test some of the conceptual issues and propositions raised by this work.

Practical implications

The paper gives practitioners better insights into the gap between desired and perceived identity with a view to improving strategic interventions to close the gap.

Originality/value

The research makes a contribution to retail identity literature by emphasising the importance of perceived identity. The work is unique in being the first research to explore further the relationship between desired and perceived identity from a fashion retailing perspective. As a consequence the strategic implications from this work for desired identity are highlighted.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 42 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 30 September 2014

Fernando Lourenço, Natalie Sappleton, Akosua Dardaine-Edwards, Gerard McElwee, Ranis Cheng, David W. Taylor and Anthony G. Taylor

The purpose of this study is to evaluate the success of a scheme, supported by the Ugandan Agribusiness Initiative Trust, to fund gender and entrepreneurship training for women…

1878

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to evaluate the success of a scheme, supported by the Ugandan Agribusiness Initiative Trust, to fund gender and entrepreneurship training for women farmers in the north of Uganda (Gulu District and Lira District). Moreover, this paper reflects upon our experience of delivering training for women farmers and highlights key observations related to women’s entrepreneurship in Uganda.

Design/methodology/approach

A practitioner-based reflection which shares the experiences of the process of developing and delivering gender and entrepreneurship training for women in Uganda.

Findings

Through the experience of running gender and entrepreneurship training for women farmers in Uganda, a series of barriers to female rural entrepreneurs are highlighted: lack of access to credit, gender inequality, poor infrastructure, lack of access to knowledge and education, negative attitudes towards women and few initiatives to facilitate economic and business success.

Originality/value

This paper provides reflection of the experience gained from the delivery of training and interaction with women farmers and entrepreneurs in Uganda.

Details

Gender in Management: An International Journal, vol. 29 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2413

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 16 May 2016

Ranis Cheng, Fernando Lourenço and Sheilagh Resnick

Despite rising graduate unemployment in the UK, there are insufficient numbers of graduates employed in small and medium sized-enterprises (SMEs). The literature suggests that a…

2707

Abstract

Purpose

Despite rising graduate unemployment in the UK, there are insufficient numbers of graduates employed in small and medium sized-enterprises (SMEs). The literature suggests that a teaching emphasis on large organisational business models in higher education institutions, particularly in the teaching of marketing theory, renders the SME sector unattractive to graduate employment and conversely, it is perceived that graduates lack additional “soft skills” vital for SME development and growth. The purpose of this paper is to provide an analysis of how SMEs define marketing and to compare student perspective on marketing within a SME context. This paper also examines the need to improve the conventional marketing curriculum with additional teaching solutions that consider the reality of UK SME ownership and student employment prospects.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative research approach was adopted using in-depth interviews amongst ten SME owners and 20 undergraduate marketing students of a UK university.

Findings

Findings revealed that the marketing practices used in SMEs were not present in the marketing curriculum in the case university. The employment of marketing graduates was not positively perceived by SME owners and equally, marketing undergraduates did not view SMEs as the career organisation of choice.

Originality/value

The study re-evaluates the HE marketing curriculum and suggests an update of the curriculum in order to move the university-industry-government relationship away from the traditional knowledge transfer perspective.

Details

Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development, vol. 23 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1462-6004

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 7 March 2016

Sheilagh Mary Resnick, Ranis Cheng, Mike Simpson and Fernando Lourenço

The purpose of this paper is to explore the extent to which traditional marketing theory and practice can be applied in small- and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) and consider how…

19093

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the extent to which traditional marketing theory and practice can be applied in small- and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) and consider how owner-managers perceive their own role in marketing within a small business setting.

Design/methodology/approach

–A qualitative exploratory approach using semi-structured in-depth interviews amongst owner-managers of SMEs in the UK.

Findings

SME marketing is effective in that it embraces some relevant concepts of traditional marketing, tailors activities to match its customers and adds its own unique attribute of self-branding as bestowed by the SME owner-manager.

Research limitations/implications

The study was limited to the UK and to a small sample of SMEs and as such the findings are not necessarily generalisable.

Originality/value

A “4Ps” model for SME self-branding is proposed, which encompasses the attributes of personal branding, (co)production, perseverance and practice.

Details

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. 22 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 4 February 2014

Gerard P. Prendergast, Alex S.L. Tsang and Ranis Cheng

Handbills are an interesting advertising medium since they are distributed by people in a social context. Little, however, is known about why handbills are often avoided. This…

Abstract

Purpose

Handbills are an interesting advertising medium since they are distributed by people in a social context. Little, however, is known about why handbills are often avoided. This study was designed with the purpose of extending previous research on advertising avoidance by using social psychological variables to explain consumers' avoidance of handbills in Hong Kong and the UK.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey of 337 individuals was conducted (166 in Hong Kong and 171 in the UK). A series of hypotheses relating to perceived handbill clutter, perceived goal impediment, and the perceived manner of the distributer were tested.

Findings

Perceived handbill clutter was found to be the strongest predictor of handbill avoidance in both Hong Kong and the UK. The second strongest predictor was perceived goal impediment. The perceived manner of the distributor did not predict handbill avoidance in Hong Kong, but it did predict handbill avoidance in the UK.

Research limitations/implications

The study's methodology has a number of limitations. First, the measure of the distributor's perceived manner may not have directly tapped the distributor dimensions of importance to handbill avoidance. Second, no account was taken of non-response bias. The model also did not recognize that there may be other variables capable of explaining handbill avoidance.

Practical implications

The results suggest that effort is needed to raise the perceived value of handbills so that their perceived value neutralizes any perceptions of goal impediment. In addition, handbill designers need to find creative ways to stand out from the clutter. In the UK, deportment should be considered when distributors are recruited and trained.

Originality/value

Handbills are frequently used as a promotional tool. In two contrasting countries, this study found that perceived handbill clutter, perceived goal impediment, and perceived manner of the distributer influence handbill avoidance. The research has extended theoretical knowledge related to advertising avoidance and generated insights that are likely to be of practical value to marketers.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 48 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 30 May 2008

Leslie de Chernatony, George Christodoulides, Stuart Roper and Temi Abimbola

981

Abstract

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 42 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Content available
Article
Publication date: 12 July 2011

Jonathan H. Deacon

335

Abstract

Details

Journal of Research in Marketing and Entrepreneurship, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-5201

Article
Publication date: 19 February 2021

C. Lakshmi and K. Usha Rani

Resilient distributed processing technique (RDPT), in which mapper and reducer are simplified with the Spark contexts and support distributed parallel query processing.

Abstract

Purpose

Resilient distributed processing technique (RDPT), in which mapper and reducer are simplified with the Spark contexts and support distributed parallel query processing.

Design/methodology/approach

The proposed work is implemented with Pig Latin with Spark contexts to develop query processing in a distributed environment.

Findings

Query processing in Hadoop influences the distributed processing with the MapReduce model. MapReduce caters to the works on different nodes with the implementation of complex mappers and reducers. Its results are valid for some extent size of the data.

Originality/value

Pig supports the required parallel processing framework with the following constructs during the processing of queries: FOREACH; FLATTEN; COGROUP.

Details

International Journal of Intelligent Computing and Cybernetics, vol. 14 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-378X

Keywords

1 – 10 of 261