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Article
Publication date: 24 January 2018

Manish Kumar, Hemang Jauhari, Rani S. Ladha and Niti Shekhar

This paper aims to study gender differences on six organizational climate variables. Employees’ views on their identification level, clarity of goals, perceived equity…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to study gender differences on six organizational climate variables. Employees’ views on their identification level, clarity of goals, perceived equity, welfare measures and outward focus of the organization were solicited in two different studies, while supervisors’ views on subordinates’ deviant behavior was explored in one of the studies.

Design/methodology/approach

The research design incorporated getting data using a questionnaire from two large organizations in India: a government utility and a private sector company. In all, 545 responses from government utility and 8,853 responses from the private company were analyzed, which formed the basis for this study.

Findings

The paper demonstrates that gender differences in employee perceptions are not only socially determined for some variables but in fact may also depend on the organizational structural contexts in presence of explicit supporting policies. Gender differences in identification level and goal clarity were determined by larger social context in the absence of any structural arrangement in both organizations. However, gender differences regarding perceived climate of welfare measures, outward focus of the organization and fairness were contingent on the structural context of the two organizations on account of differing arrangements in both the organizations. Also, women participants were perceived by their supervisors to indulge less in deviant behavior as compared to male participants in one of the study.

Research limitations/implications

Although this research includes only two organizations and the findings may, thus, not be generalizable, a key finding that emerges is that to balance the needs of both genders, managers may need to be cognizant of both organizational and social contexts.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this study is first to consider a detailed analysis of organizational climate with respect to gender perception particularly in the Indian context. The context of the study in two structurally different large organizations further adds to the value of this research.

Details

Gender in Management: An International Journal, vol. 33 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2413

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 7 September 2015

S.K. Shanthi, Sanjoy Sircar and K. Srinivasa Reddy

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Commerce and Management, vol. 25 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1056-9219

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Article
Publication date: 30 September 2014

Abhilash Sreekumar Nair and Rani Ladha

– The purpose of this paper is to identify underlying characteristics of Indian investors that influence them to achieve their non-economic investment goals.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify underlying characteristics of Indian investors that influence them to achieve their non-economic investment goals.

Design/methodology/approach

The conceptual model posits that investors’ choice of non-economic goal (NEG) is determined by their values and beliefs which are measured through survey data collected from 342 respondents with prior experience of investing in the stock market. A structural equation model is specified to estimate the measurement model. Further, the study analyses the mediating effect of social investment efficacy on the impact of investors’ values and beliefs and their pursuit of non-economic investment goals.

Findings

Religiosity and the belief that one’s actions can bring about a change in the society are the two important determinants of Indian investors’ pursuit of non-economic investment goal.

Research limitations/implications

The model ignores aspects of an investor’s financial stability that may influence the urge to pursue non-economic investment goals.

Practical implications

Socially responsible (SR) funds with investment filters designed to propagate religious values of Indian investors can be designed. As a result, it should be possible to channelize a part of the more than $15 billion available in different religious institutions across the country into the capital market.

Social implications

Availability of SRI funds would provide investors with yet another avenue invest in companies that conform to their protected values.

Originality/value

This is the first study that attempts to study investor characteristics (values and beliefs) and its impact on investor’s NEG in the Indian context.

Details

Corporate Governance, vol. 14 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1472-0701

Keywords

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