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Article
Publication date: 20 July 2010

Randal Ford

This paper aims to determine what leader‐leading competencies enable management of turbulent, uncertain change and what principles from a complex adaptive systems…

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1984

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to determine what leader‐leading competencies enable management of turbulent, uncertain change and what principles from a complex adaptive systems perspective constitute it.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is a qualitative research case study.

Findings

It is found that there are three leading‐ship competencies: administrative, adaptive and enabling.

Originality/value

The paper illustrates that complex adaptive organizations oblige leaders to view differently organizational networks and their role within such networks.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 31 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 7 March 2008

Randal Ford

The purpose of this paper is to examine organizational practice to investigate what insights could be gained to support and extend existing theory.

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11532

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine organizational practice to investigate what insights could be gained to support and extend existing theory.

Design/methodology/approach

Adopts a clinical approach, e.g. not a priori or an academic one where data are mangled to fit a theoretical stance.

Findings

Data analysis reveals four interconnected learning cycles and the enabling structures put in place to facilitate them. The practice‐based themes support many organization learning theories; in addition, the findings augment the systems perspective.

Research limitations/implications

Challenges traditional logical‐deductive (theory driven) stances. Findings do not pretend to be generalizable or definitive, but more evocative.

Practical implications

The paper discusses practical implications in how firms might implement enabling structures for organizational learning; and what accompanying changes in management practices and leadership would be required in implementing these facilitative structures.

Originality/value

This paper provides value to all organizations, in that it outlined how personnel at all organization levels can think, plan, innovate, process information and coordinate in working together. In adopting the perspective of praxis within an unconventional organizational context, the empirical findings support and reinforce some theories of organizational learning, extend or refute others and add new insights.

Details

The Learning Organization, vol. 15 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-6474

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2003

So how might you describe you and your firm’s attitudes? Complacent? How about resigned or cynical? If you are lucky enough to be part of an organization that has enjoyed…

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749

Abstract

So how might you describe you and your firm’s attitudes? Complacent? How about resigned or cynical? If you are lucky enough to be part of an organization that has enjoyed continued success, you would not be blamed for believing things will always continue to work well as they are. On the other hand, if you have had to get through a few failures, you might well be resigned to thinking you will never get it right so why bother. Or, if you have been let down in the past, you are probably a bit pessimistic in your outlook, whether you have noticed it or not. Whichever most applies to you or your firm, chances are you are not keen on the idea of change.

Details

Strategic Direction, vol. 19 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0258-0543

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Article
Publication date: 22 March 2011

Reviews the latest management developments across the globe and pinpoints practical implications from cutting‐edge research and case studies.

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937

Abstract

Purpose

Reviews the latest management developments across the globe and pinpoints practical implications from cutting‐edge research and case studies.

Design/methodology/approach

This briefing is prepared by an independent writer who adds their own impartial comments and places the articles in context.

Findings

“The show must go on” is a theatrical tenet which applies universally to situations where, no matter what disaster occurs, leaders who manage organizations have to overcome it and get on with the job. In turbulent and uncertain environments organizations have to expect the unexpected and build themselves structures robust – and flexible – enough to withstand whatever adversity or catastrophe gets in the way of going about business.

Practical implications

Provides strategic insights and practical thinking that have influenced some of the world's leading organizations.

Originality/value

The briefing saves busy executives and researchers hours of reading time by selecting only the very best, most pertinent information and presenting it in a condensed and easy‐to‐digest format.

Details

Human Resource Management International Digest, vol. 19 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0967-0734

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2005

Randal Ford

To research how the chief executive officers (CEO) and vice presidents (VPs) and Spartanburg Regional Healthcare System (SRHS) developed into a highly collaborative…

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6867

Abstract

Purpose

To research how the chief executive officers (CEO) and vice presidents (VPs) and Spartanburg Regional Healthcare System (SRHS) developed into a highly collaborative enterprise in managing change on a daily basis.

Design/methodology/approach

A combination of research methods, both qualitative and quantitative, was used in gathering data. Archival records – meeting minutes, memos, internal and external diagnostic surveys, local and regional newspapers – enabled collecting data over an extended period, in addition to direct observation (April 2003‐May 2004) and interviews: retrospective and concurrent. Content analysis – a qualitative method employed through grounded theory (analytic induction) – generated the themes from the archival and interview data.

Findings

Quantitative data suggest for the years May 2000‐December 2003 a change in behavior toward more participation occurred at SRHS, on an organizational level and in the relations between the CEO and VPs; also during this period the hospital's patient satisfaction scores improved significantly from 50 to low‐to‐mid 90 percent. The collaborative work practices the CEO and VPs had assumed was not the norm for the VPs working at SRHS back in March 2000, under the former CEO's administration. Research shows by May 2004 the current CEO and VPs' social interaction had evolved into practices of reciprocal power relations and knowledge sharing that was more decentralized, lateral, team‐based, and participative than a strict bureaucracy would tolerate.

Originality/value

Findings from this study illustrates three principles leaders can use in establishing stakeholder power relations to guide practices that aid organizations in managing change on a day‐to‐day basis.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 26 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2006

Randal Ford

The purpose of this research is to investigate the practices of the interim and current CEOs employed in managing a supportive environment conducive for learning as well…

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6009

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this research is to investigate the practices of the interim and current CEOs employed in managing a supportive environment conducive for learning as well as sustaining organizational change; and second, to describe the theory of practice guiding their efforts.

Design/methodology/approach

An action science approach, coupled with the case‐study data‐gathering method to enable a pragmatic grounding of the change processes and organizational learning.

Findings

A theory of practice defined as three process principles of power that aid in managing a supportive environment conducive for learning as well as organizational change.

Research limitations/implications

The theory of practice set forth combines two advocated views in using power (position power and empowerment) into a framework of reciprocal‐relational power. The theory needs to undergo further research to test its applicable knowledge in an action context.

Practical implications

Potential guide in helping practitioners in recognizing and implementing processes of reciprocal‐relational power to improve organizational learning and the success of change.

Originality/value

The paper presents a new way to recognize and see reciprocal‐relational forces within a cultural‐social‐political context.

Details

The Learning Organization, vol. 13 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-6474

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 20 June 2008

Randal Ford and Ingo Angermeier

This paper aims to define a theory of practice in successfully implementing management‐communication practices in the service of organizational learning.

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1603

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to define a theory of practice in successfully implementing management‐communication practices in the service of organizational learning.

Design/methodology/approach

A combination of research methods, both quantitative and qualitative, was used in gathering and analyzing data.

Findings

Three principles in creating a supportive environment conducive to employee empowerment and participative decision making enable organizational learning.

Research limitations/implications

The study provides empirical findings in support of current theoretic knowledge in organizational learning and empowerment.

Originality/value

The paper partly rectifies that little research has investigated the enabling structures and processes to manage the environment that surrounds and supports employee participative decision making and new learning to occur at the individual and collective level within a health care setting.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 22 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1993

Mervyn Richardson

Reviews some of the chemistry and environmental hazards associatedwith chlorine and bromine compounds when used as water disinfectants inmany industrial processes. Lays…

Abstract

Reviews some of the chemistry and environmental hazards associated with chlorine and bromine compounds when used as water disinfectants in many industrial processes. Lays emphasis on the oxidation of bromide by chlorine to bromate, a suspected genotoxin. A risk assessment of the predicted presence is detailed. In view of the formation of haloforms and other noxious substances derived from chlorine, some of the advantages of the use of chlorine dioxide are detailed. Proposes recommendations for water regulators to consider the inclusion of bromine‐containing substances, and in particular bromate, in forthcoming legislation.

Details

Environmental Management and Health, vol. 4 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0956-6163

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Article
Publication date: 9 February 2010

Luiz Felipe Scavarda, Andreas Reichhart, Silvio Hamacher and Matthias Holweg

The need for an efficient provision of product variety has been widely established as a means of competing in the marketplace, yet previous studies into the management of…

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3507

Abstract

Purpose

The need for an efficient provision of product variety has been widely established as a means of competing in the marketplace, yet previous studies into the management of product variety have commonly analysed products in isolated developed markets. The purpose of this paper is to investigate how firms manage their product variety in emerging markets. This paper aims to investigate the rationale underlying the restriction of variety in such settings, and define general mechanisms by which firms can adapt their product variety when operating in both emerging and developed markets simultaneously.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper uses the case of a global vehicle manufacturer that offers common products across developed and emerging markets to illustrate the difference between them in terms of product variety, and examine the process that underlies its management. The paper utilises a combination of data collection techniques.

Findings

The paper shows empirically how product variety (in particular ex factory variety) is restricted in emerging markets, as one would expect, and it identifies the mechanisms by which product variety is managed across different markets. The paper further illustrates how emerging markets have developed secondary coping mechanisms to deliver additional variety through late configuration in the distribution system.

Originality/value

By examining the differential management of product variety in emerging and developed markets, the findings yield several novel aspects by providing both empirical evidence and explanations for the restriction of product variety in emerging markets.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 30 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

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Article
Publication date: 2 September 2013

Sandra C. Buttigieg, Vincent Cassar and Judy W. Scully

The following case study aims to explore management's, health professionals' and patients' experiences on the extent to which there is visibility of management support in…

Abstract

Purpose

The following case study aims to explore management's, health professionals' and patients' experiences on the extent to which there is visibility of management support in achieving effective interdisciplinary team working, which is explicitly declared in the mission statement of a 60-bed acute rehabilitative geriatric hospital in Malta.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 21 semi-structured interviews were conducted with the above-mentioned key stakeholders.

Findings

Three main distinct yet interdependent themes emerged as a result of thematic analysis: “managing a team-friendly hospital”, “interdisciplinary team components”, and “interdisciplinary team processes”. The findings show that visibility of management support and its alignment with the process and content levels of interdisciplinary teamwork are key to integrated care for acute rehabilitative geriatric patients.

Research limitations/implications

The emerging phenomena may not be reproducible in a different context; although many of the emerging themes could be comfortably matched with the existing literature.

Practical implications

The implications are geared towards raising the consciousness and conscientiousness of good practice in interdisciplinary teamwork in hospitals, as well as in emphasizing organizational and management support as crucial factors for team-based organizations.

Social implications

Interdisciplinary teamwork in acute rehabilitative geriatrics provides optimal quality and integrated health care delivery with the aim that the older persons are successfully discharged back to the community.

Originality/value

The authors draw on solid theoretical frameworks – the complexity theory, team effectiveness model and the social identity theory – to support their major finding, namely the alignment of organizational and management support with intra-team factors at the process and content level.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 27 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

Keywords

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