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Open Access
Article
Publication date: 7 June 2019

Rana Tassabehji, Ray Hackney and Takao Maruyama

The purpose of this paper is to consider recent field evidence to analyse what online public services citizens need, explores potential citizen subsidy of these specific…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to consider recent field evidence to analyse what online public services citizens need, explores potential citizen subsidy of these specific services and investigates where resources should be invested in terms of media accessibility. The authors explore these from a citizen-centric affordability perspective within three exemplar developing countries in sub-Saharan Africa. The World Bank and United Nations in particular promote initiatives under the “Information and Communication Technologies for Development” (ICT4D) to stress the relevance of e-Government as a way to ensure development and reduce poverty. The authors adopt a contingency value approach to determine directly reported citizens willingness to pay for digital public services. Hence, our focus is mainly upon an empirical investigation through extensive fieldwork in the context of sub-Sahara Africa. A substantive survey was conducted in the respective cities of Addis Ababa (Ethiopia), Lagos (Nigeria) and Johannesburg (South Africa). The sample of citizens was drawn from each respective Chamber of Commerce database for Ethiopia and South Africa, and for Nigeria a purchased database of businesses, based on stratified random sampling. These were randomly identified from both sectors ensuring all locations were covered with a total sample size of 1,297 respondents. It was found, in particular, that citizens were willing to pay to be able to access digital public services and that amounts of fees they were willing to pay varied depending on what services they wish to access and what devices they use (PCs or mobile phones).

Design/methodology/approach

The authors adopt a contingency value approach to determine directly reported citizens willingness to pay for digital public services. A survey was conducted in the respective cities of Addis Ababa (Ethiopia), Lagos (Nigeria) and Johannesburg (South Africa). The sample of citizens was drawn from each respective Chamber of Commerce database for Ethiopia and South Africa, and for Nigeria a purchased database of businesses, based on stratified random sampling. These were randomly identified from both sectors ensuring all locations were covered with a total sample size of 1,297 respondents.

Findings

The findings suggest that by understanding citizen needs, demands and how they can benefit from online public services could drive decisions related to what public services need to be prioritised for economically active citizens, potentially explore citizen subsidy of these specific public services which will have a trickle-down benefit to poorer citizens by reducing the pressures on traditional channels of public service delivery and investigate where resources should be invested in terms of media to access online services. Willingness to pay between the top online public services showed no statistically significant difference among all respondents.

Research limitations/implications

The research focused on economically active digitally savvy citizens in the major capital cities in each of our selected countries. While these are not representative of the population at large, our intention was to understand what citizen-led government services would look like from the perspective of this group, with an insight into the value they place on these online services and their ability to access them. Technology diffusion starts with the early adopters (Rogers, 2010), and here the authors have focused on those that are likely to be early adopters.

Practical implications

Poor fiscal capacity, namely, the amount and type of resources a state has at its disposal, not only has an impact on economic wellbeing, but particularly relevant in this case, also has an impact on the quality of government (Baskaran and Bigsten, 2013). Thus, e-government is one way in which developing countries can focus on developing good governance and strengthening civil society to improve the quality of government and motivate citizens to participate in the political process.

Social implications

The economic performance of African countries has been viewed with pessimism, consistently considered to be the poorest continent (Harrison et al., 2014). Recent studies have empirically shown that new information technologies have contributed to longer term economic growth in African countries and stress the need for government to further invest in developing telecommunications infrastructures and internet access (Donou-Adonsou et al., 2016). However one of the major constraints and challenges for developing countries is the limited fiscal capacity and ability to mobilise fiscal resources to finance the provision of public services, which is essential for economic development (Ali et al., 2015).

Originality/value

The authors contribute to the World Bank and United Nations initiatives to promote ICT for Development’ (ICT4D) the relevance of e-government as a way to ensure development and reduce poverty. If online services are of no benefit, even if they are more convenient and lower cost, they are unlikely to be used. Accessing digital public services directly addresses the needs of economically active citizens and can also facilitate the steps towards an improved quality of government and interaction with civil society. The study has contributed to an insightful understanding of the value, cost and benefits of citizen-led e-Government in this respect.

Details

Information Technology & People, vol. 32 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 17 September 2021

Carine Dominguez-Péry, Rana Tassabehji, Lakshmi Narasimha Raju Vuddaraju and Vikhram Kofi Duffour

This paper aims to explore how big data analytics (BDA) emerging technologies crossed with social media (SM). Twitter can be used to improve decision-making before and…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore how big data analytics (BDA) emerging technologies crossed with social media (SM). Twitter can be used to improve decision-making before and during maritime accidents. We propose a conceptual early warning system called community alert and communications system (ComACom) to prevent future accidents.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on secondary data, the authors developed a narrative case study of the MV Wakashio maritime disaster. The authors adopted a post-constructionist approach through the use of media richness and synchronicity theory, highlighting wider community voices drawn from social media (SM), particularly Twitter. The authors applied BDA techniques to a dataset of real-time tweets to evaluate the unfolding operational response to the maritime emergency.

Findings

The authors reconstituted a narrative of four escalating sub-events and illustrated how critical decisions taken in an organisational and institutional vacuum led to catastrophic consequences. We highlighted the specific roles of three main stakeholders (the ship's organisation, official institutions and the wider community). Our study shows that SM enhanced with BDA, embedded within our ComACom model, can better achieve collective sense-making of emergency accidents.

Research limitations/implications

This study is limited to Twitter data and one case. Our conceptual model needs to be operationalised.

Practical implications

ComACom will improve decision-making to minimise human errors in maritime accidents.

Social implications

Emergency response will be improved by including the voices of the wider community.

Originality/value

ComACom conceptualises an early warning system using emerging BDA/AI technologies to improve safety in maritime transportation.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 41 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 28 September 2010

Rana Tassabehji

E‐auctions have had a big impact on procurement over the past decade. Despite the benefits, there has been well documented resistance to this procurement medium. There is…

4418

Abstract

Purpose

E‐auctions have had a big impact on procurement over the past decade. Despite the benefits, there has been well documented resistance to this procurement medium. There is a need to understand factors which influence motivation to use and attitude towards e‐auctions, in order to facilitate practitioners' ability to develop and adapt e‐auctions into an effective procurement tool. This paper seeks to address this issue.

Design/methodology/approach

A model of the inter‐relationships between e‐auction drivers is derived from an analysis of the literature. Data from a sample of senior procurement professionals across several industry sectors were collected by online questionnaire and a structural equation model was fitted using PLS.

Findings

The study reveals that e‐auction use for procurement is motivated by building relationships with suppliers and not solely as a means of optimising prices of goods and services. Where attitude towards e‐auction use is negative, this is mainly driven by a strategic approach to procurement.

Originality/value

Nowhere in the extant literature has there been a study on the impact of how the organisational role of procurement by the organisation impacts e‐auctions use and attitudes. Furthermore, by distinguishing between motivations for using e‐auctions and attitudes towards them, procurement professionals are found to have a negative attitude to e‐auctions, but at the same time their motivations for using them are significantly linked to building relationships with their suppliers. This suggests that the potential of e‐auctions as a powerful procurement tool is being realised, but as yet has not been fully developed and implemented. The implications are that procurement managers should focus on developing the use of e‐auctions in a more strategic way to maximise both their effectiveness and the investment in them for the longer term.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 15 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

Keywords

Content available

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. 16 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2007

Graham Orange, Tony Elliman, Ah Lian Kor and Rana Tassabehji

The purpose of this paper is to propose a more realistic view of innovation in local government. A key element in this is the notion of innovation value based on people…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to propose a more realistic view of innovation in local government. A key element in this is the notion of innovation value based on people, processes and technology.

Design/methodology/approach

The objectives are achieved by reviewing the background literature, a recent study of eGoverment achievement in the UK – VIEGO, and government assessments of innovation in both the EU and the UK. Some empirical evidence of the inherent complexity is also used.

Findings

Extant models of innovation tend to focus on the private sector values and their transfer to the public sector is questionable. This with combined with a weak approach to evaluation leaves local government vulnerable.

Originality/value

The political rhetoric that accompanied the introduction of eGovernment expected it to produce innovation in the way government agencies conducted themselves. It is assumed that this innovation is both “good” and inevitable. This paper challenges these simplistic assumptions and proposes a more realistic view.

Details

Transforming Government: People, Process and Policy, vol. 1 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6166

Keywords

Content available

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. 14 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 September 2007

Zahir Irani and Ahmad Ghoneim

319

Abstract

Details

Transforming Government: People, Process and Policy, vol. 1 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6166

Content available
Article
Publication date: 6 February 2009

2116

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 29 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 41 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

Article
Publication date: 3 February 2021

Hani Al-Dmour, Nour Saad, Eatedal Basheer Amin, Rand Al-Dmour and Ahmed Al-Dmour

This paper aims to examine factors influencing the practices of big data analytics applications by commercial banks operating in Jordan and their bank performance.

1012

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine factors influencing the practices of big data analytics applications by commercial banks operating in Jordan and their bank performance.

Design/methodology/approach

A conceptual framework was developed in this regard based on a comprehensive literature review and the Technology–Environment–Organization (TOE) model. A quantitative approach was used, and the data was collected from 235 commercial banks’ senior and middle managers (IT, financial and marketers) using both online and paper-based questionnaires.

Findings

The results showed that the extent of the practices of big data analytics applications by commercial banks operating in Jordan is considered to be moderate (i.e. 60%). The results indicated that 61% of the variation on the practices of big data analytics applications by commercial banks could be predicated by TOE model. The organizational factors were found the most important predictors. The results also provide empirical evidence that the extent of practices of big data analytics applications has a positive influence on the bank performance. In the final section, research implications and future directions are presented.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to theory by filling a gap in the literature regarding the extent of the practices of big data analytics applications by commercial banks operating in developing countries, such as Jordan. It empirically examines the impact of the practices of big data analytics applications on bank performance.

Details

VINE Journal of Information and Knowledge Management Systems, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-5891

Keywords

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