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Article
Publication date: 28 June 2011

Shambavi Rajagopal, Sitalakshmi Ramanan, Ramanan Visvanathan and Subhadra Satapathy

The purpose of this paper is to introduce Halal certification as a new marketing paradigm which marketers can use to differentiate their products and services in the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to introduce Halal certification as a new marketing paradigm which marketers can use to differentiate their products and services in the current competitive environment.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 151 questionnaires were distributed to the business student population from different universities in United Arab Emirates (UAE). The self‐administered questionnaire required the respondents to answer demographics questions on emirate of residence within UAE, gender, age and nationality, followed by specific questions to determine if respondents actively seek Halal certification for various products and services and if they were aware of brands offering certification. The questionnaire concluded with an open‐ended question to find out what Halal certification meant to the respondent.

Findings

The application of statistical tools indicated that, although the concept of Halal is familiar to the students, their awareness of whether products are Halal certified and their knowledge about Halal brands is extremely low.

Practical implications

This paper suggests a model for marketers to brand their products and services by seeking, highlighting and communicating Halal certification in the UAE and possibly extending to the world markets.

Originality/value

The paper suggests that consumers are not exposed enough to Halal certification and Halal brands through marketing communication and suggests the greater use of marketing and branding to promote and sell Halal products and services. It has immediate practical relevance to marketing practitioners and strategic planners.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

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Article
Publication date: 14 June 2021

Hardius Usman, Chairy Chairy and Nucke Widowati Kusumo Projo

The purpose of this paper is to: build Muslim consumer decision-making style (MCDMS); analyze the influence of the consumer decision-making style on Muslim behavior to buy…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to: build Muslim consumer decision-making style (MCDMS); analyze the influence of the consumer decision-making style on Muslim behavior to buy halal certified food; analyze the impact of religiosity on Muslim behavior in buying halal-certified food and study the role of religiosity in the relationship between MCDMS and Muslim behavior in buying halal certified food.

Design/methodology/approach

This study’s target population is the Muslim Indonesian population age at least 18 years old. The self-administered survey method is carried out based on convenience and snowball sampling techniques and the questionnaire is distributed online. This study collects data from 396 Muslim respondents in Indonesia through an online survey. Factor analysis and regression with interaction variables are applied to test the research hypothesis statistically.

Findings

This study reveals several results: MCDMS produces 10 dimensions; halal consciousness is an important dimension; the perfectionist/high-quality conscious and price-conscious, has a significant negative effect on the intention to buy halal-certified food; the halal consciousness and the recreational/hedonic conscious have a significant positive effect on the intention to buy halal certified food; religiosity has a significant positive impact directly on the intention to purchase halal-certified food; Religiosity positively moderates the impact of a perfectionist/high-quality conscious and price-conscious on the intention to buy halal-certified food.

Originality/value

This paper will build an MCDMS by adding the dimensions of halal consciousness. The author has not found literature about MCDMS. This research will also study the impact of MCDMS and religiosity on the intention to buy halal-certified food, as well as will study the role of religiosity in relationships between Muslim decision-making styles and intention to buy halal-certified food. Similar research is still very limited in marketing literature.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

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Article
Publication date: 16 June 2021

Mohammad Iranmanesh, Madugoda Gunaratnege Senali, Morteza Ghobakhloo, Davoud Nikbin and Ghazanfar Ali Abbasi

The halal food market is a large and fast-growing market. To maintain and boost the growth of the halal food industry, scholars have attempted to understand the behaviour…

Abstract

Purpose

The halal food market is a large and fast-growing market. To maintain and boost the growth of the halal food industry, scholars have attempted to understand the behaviour of Muslims and non-Muslims towards halal food. To advance understating of previous studies on behaviour towards halal food and shedding light on future studies, this study aims to systematically review the literature.

Design/methodology/approach

A sample of 985 peer-reviewed papers was extracted from Scopus and Web of Science databases. A total of 96 articles related to customers' behaviour towards halal food by reviewing the titles, abstracts and contents of the extracted articles were identified and reviewed.

Findings

This study illustrates: (i) various research designs and methodology used in halal food context, (ii) theories that researchers used to explain customer behaviour towards halal food, (iii) most tested behaviours and (iv) determinants of customer behaviour towards halal food.

Originality/value

The findings provide deep insights into the current state of halal food literature. This paper highlights many gaps in the literature and suggests directions for future studies to advance the understanding of customer behaviour towards halal food. This study will help researchers to identify the new dimensions of research and contribute to the literature.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 22 January 2021

Sahat Aditua Fandhitya Silalahi, Fachrurazi Fachrurazi and Achmad Muchaddam Fahham

This study aims to investigate the effect of religiosity, government support, consumer demand, the expectation for higher revenue and competition intensity on Indonesian…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate the effect of religiosity, government support, consumer demand, the expectation for higher revenue and competition intensity on Indonesian small and medium-sized enterprises’ (SMEs) intention to adopt halal practices.

Design/methodology/approach

This study used a quantitative approach and surveyed 228 SME owners through electronic media and direct contact. The study then applied the structural equation modeling to evaluate the relationship between constructs. This study also conducted some modifications on the hypotheses structured to obtain the best model.

Findings

This study found that religiosity, government support and expectation for higher revenue have positive and significant effects on SMEs’ intention to adopt halal practices; conversely, consumer demand and competition intensity do not have significant effects.

Originality/value

While in Indonesia, many studies have been conducted on consumers as subjects concerning halal awareness and they revealed a positive effect on the intention to consume the products, still, to the best of the authors’ knowledge, there are no studies targeting producers, especially SMEs, as the research subjects. This study had fulfilled some gaps on contributing factors that encourage the adoption of halal practices on the producers’ side, especially on SMEs. Therefore, this study provided insights into how to bridge the producers’ and consumers’ interests regarding halal fulfillment. The findings also provided input on the policy formulation at the early stage of halal policy implementation.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 14 December 2020

Ujang Syahrul Mubarrok, Izzani Ulfi, Raditya Sukmana and Badri Munir Sukoco

Most available studies focus mainly on Islamic economics and finance with none conducted on Islamic marketing bibliometrics. The purpose of this paper is to commemorate…

Abstract

Purpose

Most available studies focus mainly on Islamic economics and finance with none conducted on Islamic marketing bibliometrics. The purpose of this paper is to commemorate the 11th anniversary of the Journal of Islamic Marketing (JIMA) in 2020 by evaluating the publication pattern and scientific advancement of JIMA between 2010 and 2020.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper used bibliometric analysis and visualization of similarities viewer software for the graphical conception of the bibliographic data, including bibliographic coupling, co-citation and co-occurrence of keywords.

Findings

There was an increase in the number of journal documents and this depicts a rising interest in the submission of articles. Moreover, the number of conceptual papers received has also increased and this shows JIMA’s support for knowledge development in Islamic marketing. Meanwhile, Halal is one of the currently trending topics, therefore, there is an opportunity for more exploration and research on the concept.

Research limitations/implications

The bibliographical material applied in this study was only retrieved from the Scopus database. Therefore, more studies need to be conducted by incorporating other indexing and database in the scientific field of Islamic marketing.

Practical implications

The research is useful to understand queries related to scientific products such as the number of publications, contributors, keywords, countries and institutions often used in the articles of the journal.

Originality/value

It presented an exclusive bibliometrics analysis and identified the main trend of the publications in the journal from 2010 when it was established until the second issue of volume 11 in 2020.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 14 October 2020

Siti Hasnah Hassan, Norizan Mat Saad, Tajul Ariffin Masron and Siti Insyirah Ali

Buy Muslim’s First campaign started with the primary aim of urging the Muslim community to be more vigilant about halal or Shariah-compliant products, leading to a number…

Abstract

Purpose

Buy Muslim’s First campaign started with the primary aim of urging the Muslim community to be more vigilant about halal or Shariah-compliant products, leading to a number of halal-related issues, triggered by the exploitation or misuse of the halal logo in Malaysia. The purpose of this study is to gain an understanding of the purchase intention for Muslim-made products by applying the theory of planned behaviour (TPB). Halal consciousness was integrated as a moderating influence on the purchase intention of Muslim-made products.

Design/methodology/approach

Data collection was performed through a self-administered questionnaire which was distributed through convenience sampling method. Therefore, a useful sample comprising 152 Malay Muslim participants aged over 18 was collected. For hypothesis testing, hierarchical multiple regression analysis was implemented.

Findings

It was found that the participants’ attitudes towards the purchase of Muslim-made products and their perceived behavioural control significantly influenced their purchase intention, but the subjective norm did not impact this intention. Furthermore, halal consciousness moderated the relationships among all the independent and dependent variables. Halal consciousness moderated the relationship between participants’ attitudes towards Muslim-made products and their perceived behavioural control towards the purchase intention; however, this moderation did not occur through the subjective norm and the purchase intention.

Research limitations/implications

As the findings of this study were limited to the Muslim population in Malaysia, it might be difficult to generalize for other nations that have no similarities with the Malaysian Muslim culture.

Practical implications

The findings of this study may support Muslims to implement more effective marketing strategies that attract the target customers to purchase Muslim-made products. Effective promotion may attract potential customers as well.

Originality/value

The halal consciousness among Muslim consumers is important for the moderation and prediction of consumers’ intention to purchase Muslim-made products.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 13 June 2020

Osama Sam Al-Kwifi, Hamid Mahmood Hamid Gelaidan and Abdulla Hamad M. A. Fetais

Halal markets are rapidly growing in terms of market size and global coverage; therefore, there is a critical demand to have a deeper understanding of the consumption…

Abstract

Purpose

Halal markets are rapidly growing in terms of market size and global coverage; therefore, there is a critical demand to have a deeper understanding of the consumption behavior of Muslim consumers. This study aims to explore the influence of using the Halal logo on Muslim consumers’ attitudes toward food products using the neuroscience technology of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI).

Design/methodology/approach

The theory of planned behavior represents the foundation of this research, where consumer attitudes during an fMRI experiment were evaluated based on two different groups of images: images of just the Halal logo and images of meat labeled with the Halal logo. The study used the blocked design approach to track brain responses produced from displaying the two groups of images to study participants, where brain activity represents participants’ attitudes toward selecting the products.

Findings

There were no significant variations in brain activity when participants viewed Halal and non-Halal logos; in contrast, there were significant brain changes in the ventromedial prefrontal cortex region when meat images were labeled with Halal and non-Halal logos. This suggests that the Halal logo only has an influence on perception when it co-occurs with a product.

Research limitations/implications

Tracking Muslim consumption patterns is important for managers to be able to establish strategies to target Muslim consumers. This study uses a unique technique to study the behavioral attitude of a rapidly growing market segment, which can help marketing managers tailor their advertisement strategies to be more effective.

Originality/value

Previous research on the consumption of Halal products uses conventional approaches to study the influence of the Halal logo; however, to the best of the authors’ knowledge, this study is the first to explore the influence of the Halal logo on Muslim consumers’ attitudes using fMRI technology.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 6 April 2020

Iwan Vanany, Kim Hua Tan, Nurhadi Siswanto, Niniet Indah Arvitrida and Firman Mega Pahlawan

In recent years, halal food industries are facing a high level of competition. The growing demand for halal food means firms are working hard to improve quality and reduce…

Abstract

Purpose

In recent years, halal food industries are facing a high level of competition. The growing demand for halal food means firms are working hard to improve quality and reduce halal food defects. The purpose of this study is to propose a halal-based six sigma (SS) framework that could be used to reduce halal food defects and improve compliance.

Design/methodology/approach

The proposed halal six sigma (HSS) framework has five phases based on the define-measure-analyse-improve-control (DMAIC) approach. The proposed framework also integrates halal assurance system requirements into HSS to ensure compliance. Tools used in the proposed model include SIPOC tools, Pareto diagram, root cause analysis and the improvement process flows. A case study in a chicken meat company is used to test and validate the proposed framework. In case of study research, brainstorming was used to review an initial proposed framework and focus group discussions were used to determine feasible improvement actions.

Findings

The results showed that the proposed HSS framework could be effective to detect and reduce the halal defects and lower the halal defect costs. By adopting the framework, the case firm was able to lower halal defect costs significantly and increase the SS level.

Practical implications

SS approach can be designed and adapted to specific food industry. HSS framework could provide a systematic approach to reduce halal food defects and sustain the improvement efforts. The proposed HSS framework is also easy to use to understand halal critical points and improve halal compliance.

Originality/value

This study proposed a HSS framework that can be adopted to reduce halal food defects and costs. This proposed framework will benefit the halal food industry intending to realize zero halal food defects and lower production costs. The limited number of publications in the research theme of halal food defects show that there is a significant gap in the existing body of knowledge.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. 12 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 2020

Norliza Katuk, Ku Ruhana Ku-Mahamud, Kalsom Kayat, Mohd. Noor Abdul Hamid, Nur Haryani Zakaria and Ayi Purbasari

Halal tourism is a subset of tourism activities geared towards Muslim which are aligned with the Islamic principles. As a response to this, many food operators have…

Abstract

Purpose

Halal tourism is a subset of tourism activities geared towards Muslim which are aligned with the Islamic principles. As a response to this, many food operators have realised the importance of having a halal certification to establish a better market position. In the context of Indonesia, it is yet to be known what attitudes the food operators have towards halal certification and what attributes characterised those who have obtained the certification. Therefore, this study aims to examine the attributes of food operators and their attitudes towards halal certification in Indonesia.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey and structured interview were conducted on 298 food operators in Bandung, a city in Indonesia, between August and December 2018. Seven hypotheses were proposed and tested to evaluate the association between halal certification and food operators’ attributes and their attitudes towards it.

Findings

The results of the study suggested that food operators who had halal certification can be characterised by the number of branches the businesses have, the knowledge of halal tourism and knowledge on the market segment. However, the age of their business was found not related to halal certification. In terms of attitudes, the study found that performance beliefs, intention to apply and target market segment had associated with halal certification.

Practical implications

The outcomes of the study could provide information to entities and agencies involved in the tourism industry that consider targeting Muslim travellers as their market segment. Halal certification could be an approach to facilitate tourism marketing and consequently increase the performance of food-related business sectors.

Originality/value

This study provides evidence that could lead to a better understanding of the attributes of food operators and their attitudes towards halal certification in the context of Indonesia’s tourism industry.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. 12 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

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Article
Publication date: 28 February 2020

Yuslina Liza Mohd Yusof, Wan Jamaliah Wan Jusoh and Suharni Maulan

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the relationship between perceived quality association and purchase intention to re-patronise Shariah-compliant brand…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the relationship between perceived quality association and purchase intention to re-patronise Shariah-compliant brand restaurants among Muslims in Malaysia, particularly in the Klang Valley.

Design/methodology/approach

By purposive sampling, the researcher focused on particular characteristics of a population that are of interest that are best to answer the questionnaires and have a specific type of people who can provide the coveted information. By using a self-reporting questionnaire, data from 531 respondents were obtained and analysed using structural equation modelling-partial least square.

Findings

The results showed that perceived quality association has significant and positive influences on intention to re-patronise Shariah-compliant brand restaurants. Atmospheric ambience, food taste, value for money and service personnel were indicators of perceived quality rather than characterising the content of perceived quality. Amongst the four indicators, service personnel were the most important elements for the perceived quality association and were followed by food taste. Delicious food at a reasonable price was the third criterion that is prioritised by consumers in choosing restaurants. Moreover, the atmospheric factor loading showed the lowest among the three dimensions because atmospheric ambience was the last choice when consumers re-patronise Shariah-compliant brand restaurants. Therefore, it is important for Shariah-compliant brand restaurants to concentrate on service personnel aspect and food taste in formulating their marketing strategies to sustain their competitive advantage. These insights could be used to overcome the challenges of purchase intention of Shariah-compliant brand restaurants.

Research limitations/implications

The first limitation is that the data for this paper were gathered from casual dining sit-down restaurants in Malaysia, especially in the Klang Valley. Thus, the findings may not be generalised to other types of restaurants. There are various types of restaurants in Malaysia; thus, the outcomes might be not similar to this research. Second, it was found that several respondents asserted that the topic of this paper is sensitive in nature, even for Muslim consumers. Thus, the researcher had to clarify the reasoning of the paper and the definition of Shariah-compliant brand restaurants despite the definition has been written on the first page of the questionnaire.

Originality/value

Measuring service quality by making comparisons between the customers’ expectations and the perceived performance has received much attention from both researchers and marketers. The importance of perceived quality originates from its beneficial impact on purchase intentions. This paper represents the perceived quality association as a second-order reflective model consisting of four dimensions: atmospheric ambience, food taste, value for money and service personnel, and these dimensions must be highly correlated. Buying patterns of food consumption vary between individual, from culture to culture, society to society and country to country. In managing Shariah-compliant brand restaurants, the production and food process should be governed by specific rules in Shariah. By giving real information and no false promise, the Shariah-compliant brand restaurants will gain welfare and consumers’ trust to purchase.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

Keywords

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