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Article
Publication date: 3 April 2018

Ralph Kattenbach and Simon Fietze

The purpose of this paper is to examine the influence of entrepreneurial orientation (EO) within the framework of the job demands-resources (JD-R) model.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the influence of entrepreneurial orientation (EO) within the framework of the job demands-resources (JD-R) model.

Design/methodology/approach

The sample of N=597 white-collars in the German media and IT industry is drawn via the professional network XING. Cross-sectional mediator models are used to test the hypothesis.

Findings

The processes proposed by the JD-R model find empirical support. Job demands primarily cause exhaustion while job resources increase job satisfaction. Besides, job demands reduce job satisfaction and job resources lead to less exhaustion. An exception is found for cognitive workload which rather acts like a job resource. EO mediates these effects in a favorable way. High job resources foster EO, which in turn reduces exhaustion and enhances job satisfaction. For job demands, EO shows a negative mediation reducing the health-impairment process and increasing job satisfaction.

Research limitations/implications

Future research should broach the issue of adverse effects related to extreme employee entrepreneurship and potential negative effects.

Practical implications

Supporting and supervising an EO may help employees to cope with modern job profiles in agile organizations.

Originality/value

The findings provide support for a favorable mediating role of an entrepreneurial personal resource within the JD-R model. This knowledge may be used to consider individual work orientations and to organize work in a “healthy” way.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 47 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

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Article
Publication date: 22 June 2010

Ralph Kattenbach, Evangelia Demerouti and Friedhelm Nachreiner

The aim of this study is to provide a useful conceptualization of flexible working times and to examine the relationships between flexible working times and employees'…

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12977

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this study is to provide a useful conceptualization of flexible working times and to examine the relationships between flexible working times and employees' well‐being and peer ratings of performance. It is supposed that an employee's “time‐autonomy” would be positively related to performance and well‐being. On the contrary, an unfavorable effect of “time restriction” on well‐being is expected.

Design/methodology/approach

A questionnaire‐study was conducted among 167 German employees from 17 different organizations. Information about in‐role and extra‐role performance was also obtained via peer evaluations.

Findings

The data support a two‐factor structure of flexibility. The time restriction factor adds to the degree of exhaustion and the work‐nonwork conflict, while time autonomy diminishes these outcome variables. However, the flexibility dimensions are unrelated to performance.

Originality/value

The multidimensional conceptualization of flexibility allows for the detection of advantages and drawbacks regarding the effectiveness of flexible working time models.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 15 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

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