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Article
Publication date: 9 May 2016

Ewan Sutherland

This paper aims to review the licensing in India, including the development of universal licences and of the now infamous 2G spectrum scam.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to review the licensing in India, including the development of universal licences and of the now infamous 2G spectrum scam.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is a case study drawing on a side range of official documents, including inquiry reports, policies, licences and court judgements.

Findings

Liberalisation of the sector introduced opportunities for lobbying and corruption that lead to very unusual market structures, with many operators and too little spectrum.

Research limitations/implications

Interviews with the principals were impossible.

Practical implications

It is now necessary for the government to adopt good governance processes, especially in respect of 4G and th inevitable consolidation of operators in a fair and equitable manner.

Social implications

The governance systems are incapable of controlling the corruption in the telecommunications sector and require substantial redesign.

Originality/value

The paper is the first to relate corporate political activity and corruption to outcomes in the telecommunications sector in India.

Details

info, vol. 18 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6697

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 14 December 2018

Raja Swamy

Anthropologists who study disasters share the widely acknowledged understanding that the effects of disasters tend to be more severe among economically and socially…

Abstract

Anthropologists who study disasters share the widely acknowledged understanding that the effects of disasters tend to be more severe among economically and socially marginalized communities than others. Moreover, while poverty intensifies the effects of disasters, it also places survivors at the mercy of policies they have little control over because they often tend to be socially and politically marginalized on account of their poverty. Social vulnerability in other words is a determining factor in shaping the vulnerability of populations to catastrophic events. While scholars tend to focus on the catastrophic event itself as the locus of analysis, it has also become amply clear that such studies need to be in conversation with those that explore the long-term trajectories and effects of social inequality. Drawing upon fieldwork conducted in southern India among artisanal fisher communities affected by the tsunami of 2004, this paper argues that the conceptual aims and claims of the vulnerability concept ought to be extended beyond the confines of the disaster (conceptualized as event), to the broader historical sweep of unequal social relations of production, exchange and consumption within which such communities find themselves. Positioned at a disadvantage in relation to powerful players such as the state, multilateral entities and private big capital, such communities nevertheless might also become important loci of possibility, as they bring to bear their own critiques of power, and fashion political strategies that often frustrate and undermine the conceptual frameworks and goals of contemporary capitalist-led development.

Details

Individual and Social Adaptations to Human Vulnerability
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-175-9

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 9 June 2020

Raja Swamy

This chapter examines the manner in which a disaster-affected population of artisanal fishers relocated inland to new sites following the Indian Ocean tsunami of 2004…

Abstract

This chapter examines the manner in which a disaster-affected population of artisanal fishers relocated inland to new sites following the Indian Ocean tsunami of 2004 experienced and adapted to problems of water quality, scarcity, sanitation, and drainage. While numerous studies of conflicts over water tend to focus on issues of equitable access (see Anand, 2011), this chapter seeks to link the problem to the contested priorities driving land and resource use and access. I show how inland relocation negatively impacted households, making it harder to sustain livelihoods due to distance from the coast, while imposing new costs including that of commodified and scarce water, locational deficiencies, and the structural weaknesses of new housing. Placed in a historical context, the problem of water can be seen as an aspect of the long-term problem of ecologically unequal exchange pitting local artisanal fisher communities against an aggressively state-supported commercial fishery sector. The continuity I seek to hone in on is the pattern of imposing costs on fishers while enabling the alienation and privatization of coastal resources. Taking water not only as a vital substance presenting questions of access and quality but also as a problem of drainage and effluence enables a fuller consideration of how the unequal distribution of costs on poorer populations became legitimized in the name of recovery. At the same time, the chapter also highlights the manner in which fishers refused to remain docile subjects of power and used their agency and autonomy in adapting to and sometimes refusing the terms of relocation.

Details

Anthropological Enquiries into Policy, Debt, Business, and Capitalism
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-659-4

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 9 June 2020

Abstract

Details

Anthropological Enquiries into Policy, Debt, Business, and Capitalism
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-659-4

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Abstract

Details

Individual and Social Adaptations to Human Vulnerability
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-175-9

To view the access options for this content please click here

Abstract

Details

Anthropological Enquiries into Policy, Debt, Business, and Capitalism
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-659-4

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 14 December 2018

Abstract

Details

Individual and Social Adaptations to Human Vulnerability
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-175-9

To view the access options for this content please click here
Case study
Publication date: 30 June 2014

Rekha Jain

Case A uses the context of unfair, non-transparent process of spectrum allocation by the Indian government to private operators that led to Supreme Court (SC) cancel 122…

Abstract

Case A uses the context of unfair, non-transparent process of spectrum allocation by the Indian government to private operators that led to Supreme Court (SC) cancel 122 licenses. It gives scope to discuss the relationship between policy and regulatory agencies and their effectiveness, role of other institutes outside telecom sector such as the Prime Minister Office, Empowered Group of Ministers and the Comptroller & Auditor General of India.

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Article
Publication date: 21 June 2019

Maslina Ahmad, Raja Nur Syazwani Raja Kamaruzaman, Hamdino Hamdan and Hairul Azlan Annuar

In 2011, the Malaysian cabinet approved the policy that all board of directors of companies listed on the Bursa Malaysia should consist of 30 per cent women in…

Abstract

Purpose

In 2011, the Malaysian cabinet approved the policy that all board of directors of companies listed on the Bursa Malaysia should consist of 30 per cent women in decision-making positions by the year 2016. The purpose of this paper is to examine the association between the presence of women on the board and firms’ performance following the introduction of the diversity policy.

Design/methodology/approach

The analysis uses the information of the top 200 Malaysian public listed companies for the financial year 2011–2013. The multiple regression analysis is used to estimate the relationship between the firm performance (return on assets (ROA)) as the dependent variable and the independent variables.

Findings

The results show that during the period under study, the proportion of women directors on board is negatively correlated with ROA. This indicates that the firm performance may not be dependent on the number of women directors on board. However, the results of the study also show that the academic backgrounds of the women board members add some value toward generating better firm performance.

Research limitations/implications

A small sample size of only the top 200 public listed companies was utilised. Consequently the outcome may not be generalisable to smaller public companies or private firms. Another limitation is regarding the sample period. Taking only one year before and one year after the policy’s approval may be too short of the period under study and may be too early to study the impact of the policy. Future studies could sample a longer period.

Practical implications

The findings encourage public listed companies to appoint women with the necessary qualities as members of the board and not to simply increase the number of women on boards.

Originality/value

There is a lack of work on studying women’s effectiveness on board in developing countries, whereby previous work and literature review were predominantly based upon the experience of Western economies. This study, thus, contributes to the rising literature on women board member representation based on the firm performance of the top 200 listed companies in Malaysia.

Details

Journal of Economic and Administrative Sciences, vol. 36 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1026-4116

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 2 November 2020

Vishal R. Mehta and Mayur P. Sutaria

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the influence of temperature, load and sliding speed on wear and friction behavior of LM25/SiC composites in as-cast and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the influence of temperature, load and sliding speed on wear and friction behavior of LM25/SiC composites in as-cast and heat-treated conditions.

Design/methodology/approach

The LM25/SiC aluminum matrix composites (AMCs) were prepared using the stir casting process. The wear tests were carried out using a pin-on-disc setup in dry condition. The three levels of each parameter, i.e. 100, 150 and 200°C operating temperature; 15, 25 and 35 N load; 0.8, 1.6 and 2.4 m/sec sliding speed, were considered for the investigation. ANOVA has been carried out to evaluate the percentage contribution of parameters. Scanning electron microscope analysis of worn surfaces has been carried out to understand the wear mechanism.

Findings

The wear and coefficient of friction (COF) increase with the increase in the temperature, load and sliding speed within a selected range for as-cast as well as heat-treated LM25/SiC AMCs. The mean values of wear and COF in heat-treated samples were found to be lower than as-cast samples for all cases. It was observed that the percentage wear increases significantly as temperature increases in as-cast AMCS. Mild to severe wear transition was observed at 150°C. In heat-treated AMCs, mild wear was observed irrespective of temperature. It was also observed that as the temperature increases, transition of wear mechanism from abrasive to adhesive (including delamination) occurs earlier in as-cast samples as compared to heat-treated samples.

Originality/value

There is a lack of data on combined effect of temperature, load and sliding speed on tribological aspects of as-cast and heat-treated LM25/SiC AMCs, limiting its applications. The present research work has addressed this gap.

Details

World Journal of Engineering, vol. 18 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1708-5284

Keywords

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