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Article

Raina M. Rutti, Marilyn M. Helms and Laura C. Rose

To expand the literature and enhance understanding of the mentoring process, this research proposes the social exchange theory (SET) as a framework for the exchanges that…

Abstract

Purpose

To expand the literature and enhance understanding of the mentoring process, this research proposes the social exchange theory (SET) as a framework for the exchanges that take place between individuals in a mentoring relationship.

Design/methodology/approach

A detailed literature review for mentoring and Fiske's social exchange theory propositions, as well as work by Hofstede on power distance, gender, and diversity studies, provide a new approach to mentoring research.

Findings

The four relational structures (communal sharing, authority ranking, equality matching and market pricing) developed by Fiske and the effects of diversity are integrated with the existing mentoring literature to create a new model explaining the effects exchange type and diversity have on the perceived amount of support given and received during the maturation process of the mentoring relationship.

Research limitations/implications

This paper extends an under‐researched area of mentoring with discussion and suggests areas for future research. Specifically, the study focuses on operationalising and testing the proposed, expanded mentoring model in both qualitative and quantitative research for confirmation and further theory building.

Originality/value

By integrating mentoring and Fiske's social exchange theories to provide an alternative explanation for the mentoring process, this paper proposes a number of new possible relationships that will require quantitative, confirmatory research but should add significantly to this area of study. Propositions for further testing are provided as well as suggestions for operationalising and testing the model.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 34 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

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Article

Raina M. Rutti, Jase R. Ramsey and Chenwei Li

The purpose of this paper is to understand how the individual difference of other orientation affects the rational calculation between team input and anticipated performance.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to understand how the individual difference of other orientation affects the rational calculation between team input and anticipated performance.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from 222 junior and senior level undergraduate business students. Of those students, 176 chose to take a scheduled exam as a team endeavour. Individuals were the unit of analysis in order to determine the individuals' motivation for working in teams. Other orientation was measured using the Comparative Emphasis Scale (CES). Students were asked to report their anticipated exam grade and anticipated total team hours studied. Hierarchical regression analysis was used to determine the main effects and moderation.

Findings

Other orientation moderated the relationship between the decision to take an exam with a teammate and anticipated performance. Other orientation also moderated the relationship between the anticipated amount of effort studying and anticipated performance. In both situations, business students with higher levels of other orientation calculated the rational cost‐benefit relationship less than business students with lower levels of other orientation.

Practical implications

The findings will help educators and managers understand the process by which individuals prefer to work in teams and the perceptions of increased performance when working in a team.

Originality/value

The study extends the theoretical application of other orientation into the team performance context. The moderating effect of other orientation on the relationship between team input and performance has been studied for the first time and is documented in this paper.

Details

Team Performance Management: An International Journal, vol. 18 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7592

Keywords

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Article

Raina M. Rutti, Joanne LaBonte, Marilyn Michelle Helms, Aref Agahei Hervani and Sy Sarkarat

The purpose of this paper is to summarize the benefits of including a service learning project in college classes and focusses on benefits to all stakeholders, including…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to summarize the benefits of including a service learning project in college classes and focusses on benefits to all stakeholders, including students, community, and faculty.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a snowball approach in academic databases as well as a nominal group technique to poll faculty, key topics for service learning across college disciplines are presented.

Findings

Findings include a wide range of service learning projects across disciplines.

Research limitations/implications

Areas for future research are identified to expand the service learning topic list as well as guide studies on the long-term benefit of service learning for each identified stakeholder.

Practical implications

For new faculty or faculty new to service learning, the list of paper ideas is a good first step to identify projects. While not comprehensive, the list serves to stimulate topic ideas and fills a void in the service learning literature.

Social implications

Service learning exists to provide real-world learning for students, but the projects provide benefits for community groups, agencies, and organizations. Societal benefits from the student effort are numerous and there are little or no costs to the agencies who participate.

Originality/value

The abundance of service learning literature has studied learning across disciplines and has quantitatively and qualitatively presented benefits, but no studies have worked to compile project ideas across major college disciplines. This research addresses this issue and provides the key first step to implement the service learning pedagogy: the topic idea.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 58 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

Keywords

Content available

Abstract

Details

Team Performance Management, vol. 21 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7592

Content available
Article

Fiona Lettice

Abstract

Details

Team Performance Management: An International Journal, vol. 19 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7592

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