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Article
Publication date: 23 August 2019

Rafael Ventura, María José Quero and Montserrat Díaz-Méndez

The purpose of this paper is to analyze how institutions can facilitate or inhibit radical innovation. The authors argue that organizational radical innovation is…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyze how institutions can facilitate or inhibit radical innovation. The authors argue that organizational radical innovation is necessary to maintain a competitive advantage and to evolve in the market place, and institutions are the basis of this innovation. From an innovation and service dominant (SD) logic perspective, network ties are proposed to be a determining factor for the achievement of innovation through institutionalization in the university knowledge management context.

Design/methodology/approach

A conceptual approach is applied to develop and propose a framework for deepening understanding of radical organizational innovation, institutions and network ties. Data were gathered from Link by UMA-ATech, which in the context of the University of Málaga (Spain) is with great success developing a strategy based on fostering innovation. In all, 22 in-depth interviews were conducted with actors in the Link context, together with additional important second-order data analyses (sector analyses, statistics and company websites). Because of the perceived desirability of innovation, public universities have established a model as a part of this strategy in order to foster and develop new businesses through technology transfer.

Findings

Changing institutional arrangements are the basis of innovation. Opening universities to the actors around them, with an interest in exchanging resources through the evolution of network ties toward a less bureaucratic and more collaborative and open university (tertius iungens) is the basis for reaching organizational radical innovation in the university context to develop the provider-driven radical innovation network structure via the “University Living Lab” theoretical model.

Research limitations/implications

A conceptual understanding is used in combination with an empirical approach, in which one case study and 22 organizations are considered in the context of Link-by-UMA ATech, at the University of Málaga. A range of different contexts from other universities would also be useful to add new perspectives to the development of the theory.

Practical implications

Although radical innovation is occasionally seen in systems and arises naturally in markets, it is interesting to consider the possibility of designing strategies that facilitate the process from the beginning of the design of the business model. In this sense, the present findings could help organizations in general and universities in particular, to devise strategies resulting in positive relationships that could facilitate the design of business model structures. These could in turn foster the development of new institutions resulting in new network ties, which could give rise to radical innovation through the attraction of new actors interested in exchanging service-for-service resources.

Originality/value

The present paper develops the provider-driven radical innovation network structure of the “University Living Lab” theoretical model, which encourages the university to make decisions to devise more open models based on a change of network ties, in turn based on the design of new institutional arrangements. These concepts have not previously been put together, and build on the theories of institutions and organizational radical innovation. This theoretical contribution is framed within the SD logic perspective and specifically in the 11th fundamental premise (FP 11/5th axiom) to better understand how innovation occurs in service ecosystems, allowing the provider the possibility of developing such processes through the design of institutional arrangements.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 38 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 9 March 2015

María José Quero and Rafael Ventura

The purpose of this paper is to analyse the structures of the relationships between actors in the creative industries sector using crowd-funding, and how co-creation is…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyse the structures of the relationships between actors in the creative industries sector using crowd-funding, and how co-creation is the basis for reaching balanced centricity in the creative industries.

Design/methodology/approach

The Many-to-Many Marketing Theory, Service-Dominant Logic and Service Logic are the theoretical bases for explaining how the changing roles of the actors in the creative industries sector have given the crowd a great capacity for deciding in the value-creation process. A qualitative, case-based approach is used, given the complexity of the phenomenon to be analysed.

Findings

The findings of the empirical approach have important theoretical and practical implications. On the theoretical side, it analyses the importance of balanced centricity instead of customer centricity as the basis for system stability. Findings also have implications for service managers, as this can be considered an alternative for certain business projects, especially in the creative industries sector, where a growing demand is identified, not only as a method of financing, but also as a strategy for strengthening the bond with customers.

Practical implications

The study has implications for practitioners and scholars. With respect to managers, the “balanced centricity in cultural crowd-funding” model constitutes a significant contribution, because it replaces the prominent position which until now has been enjoyed by the consumer, with the overall balance of the system, in other words, with aiming to benefit all agents. This translates into a change in how strategies are understood and applied in organisations, as in every decision organisations will have to keep in mind the implications that their decisions and actions have on the rest of the agents, with the objective of managing to exploit their “strategic potential”. Strategic planning actions are identified.

Originality/value

This paper is the first to analyse balanced centricity as the basis for system stability in the creative industries. The new tasks of the customer as a selector and financer of projects increase the roles assigned to the co-creation concept and improve the knowledge of Network Theory for the creative industries.

Details

Journal of Service Theory and Practice, vol. 25 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2055-6225

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Journal of Service Theory and Practice, vol. 25 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2055-6225

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Article
Publication date: 20 June 2017

Rafael Vidal Aroca, Carlos E.H. Ventura, Igor De Mello and Tatiana F.P.A.T. Pazelli

This paper aims to present a monitoring system and the usage of a robotic arm to remove finished parts of a three-dimensional (3D) printer build plate, enabling 3D…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to present a monitoring system and the usage of a robotic arm to remove finished parts of a three-dimensional (3D) printer build plate, enabling 3D printers to continuously build a sequence of parts.

Design/methodology/approach

The system relies on a 2-degree of freedom planar manipulator. The moment to remove printed parts from the printer build plate can be determined based on direct communication with the 3D printer control software or using information from a computer vision system that applies background subtraction and Speeded up Robust Features methods.

Findings

The proposed system automatically detects the end of standard 3D print jobs and controls the robotic arm to remove the part.

Research limitations/implications

Lighting variation can deteriorate the response of the computer vision system, which can be minimized using a controlled illumination environment. In addition, the printer build plate edges must be free so the parts can slip off the printer build plate when the robot pushes them out.

Practical implications

The system enables a more practical and automatized usage of 3D printers, reducing the need of human operators.

Social implications

The proposed system can reduce work hours of laboratory personnel, as there is no need to remove the printed parts manually before another job starts.

Originality/value

Computer vision system monitors the printing process and the automation system that enables continuous sequential 3D printing of parts. A prototype is described, which can be easily replicated with low cost parts.

Details

Rapid Prototyping Journal, vol. 23 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2546

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2000

Mary Anne Craft

This article responds to the concern of small libraries that their size puts them at a disadvantage when it comes to advocating for public funds. By means of interviews…

Abstract

This article responds to the concern of small libraries that their size puts them at a disadvantage when it comes to advocating for public funds. By means of interviews with public library administrators and local government agents, it is shown that small libraries can be successful in local public funding when they use some of the same techniques of making themselves fundable that large libraries use. These are: emphasizing the dollar value of their activities to local government; taking into account local government agendas; involving the business community as spokespersons; and astutely managing library opposition. Research for the article is based in two states where local public funding has been notoriously weak, California and Pennsylvania. Libraries discussed (selected by convenient sampling) are in library service areas ranging in population from 9,278 (Borough of Carnegie, Pennsylvania) to 54,400 (San Rafael, California).

Details

The Bottom Line, vol. 13 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0888-045X

Keywords

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Expert briefing
Publication date: 16 August 2017

Cuban retrenchment.

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 1988

Library Workstation and PC Report, founded in 1984 as M300 and PC Report, was the brainchild of Allan Pratt, then at the University of Arizona. Pratt, the founding editor…

Abstract

Library Workstation and PC Report, founded in 1984 as M300 and PC Report, was the brainchild of Allan Pratt, then at the University of Arizona. Pratt, the founding editor of Small Computers in Libraries, had a hunch that OCLC's introduction of the M300 workstation was going to call for much hand‐holding and specialist advice and information for librarians. He was right. M300 and PC Report had a subscribership well before the first issue was mailed to readers. And it remains a growing publication to this day.

Details

Library Workstation and PC Report, vol. 5 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0894-9158

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Book part
Publication date: 7 July 2017

Abstract

Details

Knowledge Transfer to and within Tourism
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-405-7

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