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Article
Publication date: 21 September 2021

Raechel Johns and Janet Davey

While there is burgeoning service literature identifying consumer vulnerabilities and questioning the assumption that all consumers have the resources to co-create…

Abstract

Purpose

While there is burgeoning service literature identifying consumer vulnerabilities and questioning the assumption that all consumers have the resources to co-create, limited research addresses solutions for consumers experiencing vulnerabilities. Service systems can provide support for consumers but can also create inequities and experienced vulnerabilities. This paper aims to identify current and further research needed to explore this issue and addresses marketplace problems for consumers experiencing vulnerabilities.

Design/methodology/approach

This viewpoint discusses key issues relating to solving marketplace problems for consumers experiencing vulnerabilities. A call for papers focused on solving marketplace problems for consumers experiencing vulnerabilities resulted in a large number of submissions. Nine papers are included in this special issue, and each one is discussed in this editorial according to five emergent themes.

Findings

Vulnerabilities can be temporary, or permanent, and anyone can suddenly experience vulnerabilities. Inequities and vulnerabilities can be due to individual characteristics, environmental forces, or due to the structure of the marketplace itself. Solutions include taking a strengths-based approach to addressing inequities and using a multiple-actor network to provide support.

Practical implications

The recommendations addressed in this paper enable more positive approaches to solving marketplace problems for consumers experiencing vulnerabilities.

Social implications

Taking a solutions-focused lens to research relating to vulnerabilities will contribute toward addressing inequities within the marketplace.

Originality/value

Increasingly, service literature is identifying inequities; however, very limited research addresses solutions for solving marketplace problems for consumers experiencing vulnerabilities. This paper suggests taking an approach focusing on strengths, rather than weaknesses, to determine strategies, and using the support of other actors (Transformative Service Mediators) where required.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 35 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

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Article
Publication date: 9 March 2020

Johra Kayeser Fatima, Rita Di Mascio, Ali Quazi and Raechel Johns

This study aims to capture the mediation role of customer–frontline employee rapport on customer satisfaction and affective, calculative and normative commitment by using…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to capture the mediation role of customer–frontline employee rapport on customer satisfaction and affective, calculative and normative commitment by using three alternative models. It also verifies the moderation effect of relationship age on the rapport-satisfaction link in each alternative model.

Design/methodology/approach

The survey data collected from bank customers were analyzed using structural equation modeling (SEM) with the partial least square (PLS) method.

Findings

Results confirmed rapport as a significant mediator between satisfaction and each of the three types of commitment. Relationship age significantly moderates the links between rapport to affective and normative commitment but not to calculative commitment.

Research limitations/implications

Additional findings from “importance–performance analysis” suggest that satisfaction is more import to customers than rapport for developing commitment, so further investigations can reveal the underlying reasons. Also, complementary mediation shows one or more missing mediators, which calls for future research.

Practical implications

Managers need to use rapport strategically with customers in different relationship ages to build different types of commitment. Specific tactics to build rapport and possible long run implications for developing affective, calculative and normative commitment have been discussed in the “note to practitioner” section.

Originality/value

Using “broaden-and-build” theory, the study extends the literature by confirming the mediation influence of rapport on satisfaction and three types of commitment relationships.

Details

International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. 38 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

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Article
Publication date: 8 April 2019

Raechel Johns and Janet Davey

The purpose of this study is to identify the role of mediators in supporting value co-creation for vulnerable consumers in a service context. The authors propose that in…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to identify the role of mediators in supporting value co-creation for vulnerable consumers in a service context. The authors propose that in transformative services, the roles of actor mediators facilitate control and empowerment for the vulnerable consumer – labelling these transformative service mediators (TSMs).

Design/methodology/approach

The authors develop a theoretical framework for the activities of mediators in value co-creation considering the interrelationships of vulnerability, structure and agency. The authors then use Prahalad and Ramaswamy’s DART (Dialogue, Access, Risk Assessment and Transparency) model as the integrating framework to describe the TSM roles in the context of the foster care service ecosystem.

Findings

The authors introduce a future research agenda regarding TSM roles in transformational service experiences and value co-creation with vulnerable consumers. Service researchers and providers are encouraged to explore effective training and motivation of TSMs.

Research limitations/implications

Understanding value co-creation for vulnerable consumers is an emerging area in service research. The TSM concept introduces a new approach to explore how value co-creation and transformative outcomes can be enhanced in service contexts where consumers experience vulnerability.

Practical implications

This paper presents an agenda for future research. The outcomes of future research based on TSM roles may help guide service providers in identifying opportunities for enhancing well-being and reducing vulnerability in service delivery.

Originality/value

This paper suggests that exploring the role of TSMs in the service process offers new insights into reducing vulnerability in service relationships.

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2019

Raechel Johns

While social marketing (SM) literature has increasingly incorporated service literature into the field, social marketers have paid limited attention to transformative…

Abstract

Purpose

While social marketing (SM) literature has increasingly incorporated service literature into the field, social marketers have paid limited attention to transformative service research (TSR). Similarly, transformative service researchers have neglected to incorporate the more traditional body of literature – SM – into their research. This paper aims to provide an extensive literature review and comparison of the bodies of literature, cautioning researchers to consider both fields of research or risk their work not being as relevant as research incorporating both literature bodies. Social value co-creation is considered as a middle-ground between the two bodies of literature.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper expands on the conceptual discussion of TSR and the more advanced empirical academic literature on SM. Framed within a context of anti-smoking, this paper explores the differences between SM and TSR, within the service ecosystem.

Findings

This paper highlights three key differences between SM and TSR. Firstly, SM focuses on changes only within a not-for-profit context, while TSR focuses on changes which may be related to both not-for-profit and for-profit objectives. Secondly, SM broadly appears to take a behavioural change from implementation perspective, with an upstream approach; while in contrast, TSR focuses more on interaction for consumer and employee well-being. Finally, when considering the service ecosystem, SM and TSR both operate at all three levels (micro, meso and macro) but may focus on different levels, depending on the initiative.

Originality/value

With the emergence of TSR, further understanding of this body of literature is necessary; otherwise, social marketers may risk their research losing ground to other bodies of literature.

Details

Journal of Social Marketing, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-6763

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 26 October 2020

Muhammad Sabbir Rahman, Bashir Hussain, Mehdi Hussain, Hasliza Hassan and Raechel Johns

The aim of this research is to examine the key determinants influencing the success of new service development projects (NSDPs) across four service typologies context.

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this research is to examine the key determinants influencing the success of new service development projects (NSDPs) across four service typologies context.

Design/methodology/approach

The researchers used the scenario-based survey method in an NSDP setting. Structural equation modelling (SEM) was used to test the proposed hypotheses based on survey data from 570 managers under four service typologies.

Findings

Service firms' cross-functional integration (CFI) and internal project team efficiency (IPTE) positively influenced NSDPs. The results also indicated that both technology infrastructure (TI) and IPTE mediated the relationship between CFI and NSDPs. In addition, the mediation effect of TI existed between the relationship of IPTE and NSDPs. Furthermore, the proposed model confirms that, for NSDPs, the role of knowledge-sharing behaviour (KSB), authentic leadership (AL) and firm's culture (FC) across the four service typologies moderated the relationship.

Practical implications

With a better understanding of the dynamics of the aforementioned variables, service managers and the project team can more effectively develop and execute strategies for an NSDP. The article enables practitioners to expand their current understanding of NSDPs by providing insights of the unique antecedents that are significant for new service development across four service types.

Originality/value

This research is the first of its kind to examine the mediating role of KSB and TI in determining NSDPs. This study provides one of the first empirical examinations on NSDPs in the context of four service typologies from the perspective of a developing country, where the service industry is competitive. The study demonstrates that the critical success factors of NSDPs do not differ across service types, thereby confirming the “One Basket Fits all” assumption in the current NSDP research study.

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Article
Publication date: 21 January 2020

Janet Davey, Judith Herbst, Raechel Johns, Joy Parkinson, Rebekah Russell-Bennett and Nadia Zainuddin

Despite the availability and accessibility of standardized screening services, such as preventative health services, many individuals avoid participation. The extant…

Abstract

Purpose

Despite the availability and accessibility of standardized screening services, such as preventative health services, many individuals avoid participation. The extant health literature has indicated that health locus of control (HLOC) influences engagement and uptake of health services. The purpose of this paper is to explore how the microfoundation, HLOC, contributes to value co-creation via service-generated and self-generated activities in standardized screening services.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative study of 25 consumers who have experienced one of the three standardized screening services in Australia was undertaken, followed by thematic analysis of the data.

Findings

Service-generated activities elicit reactive responses from consumers – compliance and relinquishing control – but when customers lead co-creation activities, their active responses emphasize protecting self and others, understanding relationship needs and gaining control. Consumers with high internal HLOC are more likely to take initiative for their health, take active control of the process and feel empowered through participating. Consumers with low internal HLOC, in contrast, require more motivation for participation, including encouragement from powerful others through promotion or interpersonal dialogue.

Social implications

These findings can be used by policymakers and providers of preventative health services for the betterment of citizen health.

Originality/value

The integration of the DART framework, customer value co-creation activities, and the delineation of self-generated and service-generated activities provides a holistic framework to understand the influence of HLOC on the co-creation of value in standardized screening services.

Details

Journal of Service Theory and Practice, vol. 30 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2055-6225

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Article
Publication date: 13 May 2019

Adrian Heng Tsai Tan, Birgit Muskat and Raechel Johns

The purpose of this paper is to examine the role of empathy in the student service experience. Taking a dyadic perspective, both students’ and staff’s perceptions are…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the role of empathy in the student service experience. Taking a dyadic perspective, both students’ and staff’s perceptions are analyzed to determine if empathy matters to both actors alike; and which differences in perceptions about the role of empathy between these actors exist.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors adopt a multi-method approach and used data from 256 usable survey responses from 11 higher education service providers in Singapore. Empathy was operationalized by six cognitive and affective independent variables and multiple multivariate analyses are applied, such as multivariate analysis of variance, discriminant analysis and multiple regression analysis.

Findings

Results show that both students and staff alike evaluate empathy as important in the co-created service experience. The provision of individualized attention to students to positively influence student experience in learning was deemed important by both staff and students. Yet, there are also distinct differences. For students, it is essential that staff members have students’ best interests at heart; for staff members, knowledge of students’ needs and show of care and concern are important.

Practical implications

Students and staff perceive empathy in higher education service provision differently. Interestingly, whilst staff think caring for students is important, students feel that too much care and concern from staff has a negative effect on their experience. Hence, too much care and concern might cause potential issues with the students’ perception of “over-servicing” which might manifest as “spoon-feeding.” Instead, students are asking for individualized and professionalized attention to be taken seriously and to be involved in the co-creation of the education service experience.

Originality/value

This study advances the understanding of affective and cognitive aspects of empathy and their influence on students’ service experiences.

Details

Journal of Service Theory and Practice, vol. 29 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2055-6225

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Article
Publication date: 15 November 2019

Johra Kayeser Fatima, Rita di Mascio, Raechel Johns and Ali Quazi

The purpose of this paper is to explore the mediation impacts of core, relational and tangible service-quality features on the relationship between customer–frontline…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the mediation impacts of core, relational and tangible service-quality features on the relationship between customer–frontline employee rapport and customer dependency in an emerging market context. The study examines the moderating effects of relationship age and frequency of customers’ physical visits.

Design/methodology/approach

Partial least squares-based structural equation modelling was used to analyse data from a survey of 290 financial services customers in Dhaka, Bangladesh using the convenience sampling technique.

Findings

Results show that relational service-quality features had the largest mediation impact on the rapport–dependency relationship, followed by core and tangible service-quality features. Relationship age was not found to be a significant moderator for any relationship. However, the moderation effect of the frequency of customers’ physical visits to the service premises was significant, but only for the link between relational service-quality features and customer dependency and not for the other two types of service-quality features.

Research limitations/implications

Data collected from several other emerging markets would provide more rigorous findings: this is recommended as an avenue for further research.

Practical implications

Practitioners can manipulate specific relational or tangible service-quality features to increase customer dependency on their firms, thus ensuring longer-term customer retention.

Originality/value

This study is the first one to examine the relative significance of the impacts of relational features vs tangible features of services on customer dependency in the emerging market context, with rapport serving as an antecedent.

Details

Journal of Service Theory and Practice, vol. 29 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2055-6225

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Article
Publication date: 19 September 2018

Mehdi Hussain, Abu Taher Mollik, Rechel Johns and Muhammad Sabbir Rahman

The purpose of this paper is to examine m-payment adoption for the bottom of pyramid (BoP) segment in a developing country context.

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1445

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine m-payment adoption for the bottom of pyramid (BoP) segment in a developing country context.

Design/methodology/approach

A questionnaire was distributed to 247 BoP customers in Bangladesh. Data were analysed by employing confirmatory factor analysis and Structural Equations Modelling.

Findings

The results show that performance expectancy (PE), effort expectancy (EE), facilitating conditions (FC), habit and social influence (SI) significantly influence the BoP segment’s behavioural intention (BI). It is revealed that PE, lifestyle compatibility (LC), SI and habit have relatively stronger effects being higher predictor of intentions. Again EE and FC have relatively lower effects on m-payment BI. On the other hand, hedonic motivation (HM) and price value (PV) are two non-significant predictors of m-payment adoption.

Practical implications

The study recommends that financial institutions, such as banks and other non-banking service firms, need to know the antecedents affecting BI suggested by the unified theory of acceptance and use of technology (UTAUT2) theory along with “LC”. This will increase m-payment adoption for the BoP segment in developing countries.

Originality/value

To the extent of researcher’s knowledge, none of the previous studies using the UTAUT2 theory to examine m-payment adoption for BoP segment. This study contributes empirical data to the predominantly theoretical literature by offering a deeper understanding of the inclusion of LC, which is one of the significant antecedents in explaining BoP segment’s m-payment adoption.

Details

International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. 37 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

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Article
Publication date: 6 May 2014

Morteza Khojastehpour and Raechel Johns

This paper aims to integrate the concepts of the internationalization process and relationship marketing (RM). It identifies two stages for internationalization…

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2651

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to integrate the concepts of the internationalization process and relationship marketing (RM). It identifies two stages for internationalization (pre-internationalization and post-internationalization) and assigns RM components for each step.

Design/methodology/approach

The study undertakes a review and synthesis of the extant literature examining internationalization and RM. It then identifies two stages of the internationalization process and its steps, associated with RM components.

Findings

The study highlights that each step in the internationalization process requires appropriate RM component to be implemented successfully.

Practical implications

Findings of this study highlight the importance of managing internationalization for firms intending to enter to foreign market and identify the issues that need to be understood, if firms are to effectively manage their internationalization strategy.

Originality/value

The paper is the first to integrate the concepts of internationalization and RM and to identify the factors that make managing these two types of firm's strategy.

Details

European Business Review, vol. 26 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-534X

Keywords

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